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Discussion Starter #1
Two things...

1 - Do any of you find it shall we say interesting that the Gen 3 service intervals call for plug replacment @ 7500 miles? That seems awfully early for a brand new bike to need new plugs especially running a totally stock setup as I am.

2 - Just browsing around it sure looks like these plugs based on the part numbers are dealer only items which means we can expect to pay some ridiculous price for them. Have any of you had luck finding them elsewhere? I'm guessing webike in Japan probably has them but shipping charges would be significant.
 

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I have a 2017 UK Gen 3. The owner's manual has two service schedules in it. One for Europe & Oceania, one for 'rest of world'.

In the Europe schedule, spark plugs are INSPECTED every 7,500 miles and CHANGED every 15,000 miles. Also, the oil change interval is every 7,500 miles (filter every 15,000).

In the 'rest of world schedule', spark plugs are changed every 7,500 miles, and the oil change interval is 3,750 miles (filter every 11,250 miles).

Same bike, same spark plugs, same recommended spec for oil, same oil filter. Suzuki warranties the bikes for 3 years in the UK with the longer service intervals.

In the UK, the plugs are usually on special offer from big Suzuki dealers, at around £5 UK each.
 

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I got mine from a UK dealer on Ebay for a pretty reasonable price and shipping was like $5 or something. I think I paid $9/plug which is way better than any source I could find domestically.
 

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Craig, the difference in maintenance schedule (and especially for spark plugs) between Europe and the rest of the world could be related to the different type of gasoline being used?
I mean, here in Europe we have 95 and 98 RON gasoline, while in the rest of the world you can find 85 and 87 RON gasoline too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have a 2017 UK Gen 3. The owner's manual has two service schedules in it. One for Europe & Oceania, one for 'rest of world'.

In the Europe schedule, spark plugs are INSPECTED every 7,500 miles and CHANGED every 15,000 miles. Also, the oil change interval is every 7,500 miles (filter every 15,000).

In the 'rest of world schedule', spark plugs are changed every 7,500 miles, and the oil change interval is 3,750 miles (filter every 11,250 miles).

Same bike, same spark plugs, same recommended spec for oil, same oil filter. Suzuki warranties the bikes for 3 years in the UK with the longer service intervals.

In the UK, the plugs are usually on special offer from big Suzuki dealers, at around £5 UK each.
Thanks and Great information if somewhat curious with regards to suzuki. You would think if they warranty the bike for 3 years that they might be more stringent with the replacement. Meanwhile in America we have a more aggressive replacement schedule despite the shorter warranty.

Maybe it's the gas difference mentioned here in this thread but that seems somewhat odd.

Guess that means the UK is another potential source for plugs. Remarkably no dealer on my area (big city in America) has these in stock..you'd think it was some odd or offbrand motorbike.
 

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I was told a good while back that the 7500 mile inspection call was due to the projection of the shell into the combustion chamber tending to accumulate carbon. If left too long it will get so thick that when you try to remove it the likelyhood of damaging the threads is increased. Inspect, clean and reinstall until the electrodes show enough wear to warrant replacement.

I believe that the SV's waste a spark on the exhaust stroke too so wear is double what would normally be expected and we've seen the stock CR8EK's in the 1K's showing significant electrode erosion in that 7500 mile run. The Iridium versions hold up a LOT better, but still shouldn't be run for the totality of the electrode life without removal due to the carbon on the end thing.

That Gen 3 plug is weird somehow and Suzuki chose it for some reason I've not figured out, but if I were to own that bike for sure I'd compare the older plugs with the stock new ones to see just where the differences lie. If the reach is the same, along with threads and insulator length....then there's no real reason to put $18+ plugs in where $7 Iridium's would work and probably work better. Now...if they used a shorter insulator due to space considerations you might be stuck needing to use the stock plugs. Investigate!:)
 

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Craig, the difference in maintenance schedule (and especially for spark plugs) between Europe and the rest of the world could be related to the different type of gasoline being used?
I mean, here in Europe we have 95 and 98 RON gasoline, while in the rest of the world you can find 85 and 87 RON gasoline too.
Apples to oranges, we don't use RON in the US, we use an average of RON and MON, also know as AKI or (R+M)/2. The additive packages are certainly different as are alcohol content and that may well be a factor, but comparing fuel grade is not that straight fwd. It also has nothing to do with fouling plugs, just resistance to pre-ignition.
 

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Craig, the difference in maintenance schedule (and especially for spark plugs) between Europe and the rest of the world could be related to the different type of gasoline being used?
I mean, here in Europe we have 95 and 98 RON gasoline, while in the rest of the world you can find 85 and 87 RON gasoline too.
I believe it's just simple economics - Suzuki has set the servicing schedules to what it thinks each market is comfortable with and what owners expect to pay for (assuming the owner has the servicing done at a dealer).

For most cars, the manufacturer's service intervals are longer in Europe than in the U.S. BMW in the U.S. states a modern 10,000 mile oil change interval for its current range of cars. But the same cars in the UK are serviced ONLY when the on-board oil sensor detects a change is needed.

In the U.S., more frequent oil changes are an accepted norm for owners (because of the number of 'lube shops' that do fast oil/filter changes). These simply don't exist in the UK.
 

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I meant to upload this yesterday but forgot. Here's the difference between the OEM Gen 3 plugs and a standard NGK CR8 (from my K6 SV).

As you can see, the plug threads and bodies are identical (I measured them with digital calipers), but the OEM plug's centre electrode is a projected-nose type.

Suzuki did say in the Gen 3 launch literature that the cylinder head shape was remodelled for the Gen 3, and it has a slightly lower CR (11.2:1).

I guess it would be possible to use CR8EIX Iridiums, there is no way they would interfere with anything in the combustion chamber as the electrodes don't reach as far as the OEM type. Alhough the longer nose of the centre electrode may be something to do with plug cooling too, an Iridium might get too hot.

 

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Changing iridium plugs at 7500 miles or even 15,000 is a total waste. They are good to 50,000 miles and more, easily. I changed the plugs on my previous V-Strom at 42,000 and they were perfect.
 

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I meant to upload this yesterday but forgot. Here's the difference between the OEM Gen 3 plugs and a standard NGK CR8 (from my K6 SV).

As you can see, the plug threads and bodies are identical (I measured them with digital calipers), but the OEM plug's centre electrode is a projected-nose type.

Suzuki did say in the Gen 3 launch literature that the cylinder head shape was remodelled for the Gen 3, and it has a slightly lower CR (11.2:1).

I guess it would be possible to use CR8EIX Iridiums, there is no way they would interfere with anything in the combustion chamber as the electrodes don't reach as far as the OEM type. Alhough the longer nose of the centre electrode may be something to do with plug cooling too, an Iridium might get too hot.
That electrode is different, so the plugs are different heat range, with the head redesigned they probably called for a different plug, not going to be able to run the CR8 on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Great upload Craig, thanks for sharing. They do look almost identical though the electrode differs slightly. I may order them (oem) on webike or a European dealer.

On second thought maybe best to just remove, inspect, clean, and reinstall if everything looks ok.
 

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On second thought maybe best to just remove, inspect, clean, and reinstall if everything looks ok.
When I checked the plugs on my own Gen 3 at 8,000 miles, the gap was still within spec (the manual states 0.8 - 0.9mm) so there was no significant wear, and they didn't even need cleaning.

Just watch out for crud & grit in the recess for the plug on the side of the front cylinder, it does collect around the plug there so give it a flush with brake cleaner or similar, and maybe a sweep with a small brush before you remove the plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When I checked the plugs on my own Gen 3 at 8,000 miles, the gap was still within spec (the manual states 0.8 - 0.9mm) so there was no significant wear, and they didn't even need cleaning.

Just watch out for crud & grit in the recess for the plug on the side of the front cylinder, it does collect around the plug there so give it a flush with brake cleaner or similar, and maybe a sweep with a small brush before you remove the plug.
Thank you for the advice. I have some brake cleaner around so now just need to finish up a project or two and then order the plugs.

When I do then I'll post some pictures here to add context. It will be my first time doing anything to this 3rd gen beyond chain upkeep and oil changes. I wonder how it will look compared to the gen 2 and other bikes I've had.
 

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Craig, the difference in maintenance schedule (and especially for spark plugs) between Europe and the rest of the world could be related to the different type of gasoline being used?
I mean, here in Europe we have 95 and 98 RON gasoline, while in the rest of the world you can find 85 and 87 RON gasoline too.
Yep. Gasoline quality is the main reason. Here in South america we only have poor fuel (89 octanes) and very dirty. For this reason Suzuki recommends change spark plugs each 7,5k mi ou 10 k km. I change my oil each 2k km with filter and use injector cleaners mixed to he fuel each 5k km. Sad.
 

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My bad. The NGK cr8eix/4218 were not actually for the Gen3 as I initially thought. A month ago I switched back to OEM plugs since they were finally available. Even the gap of the cr8eix/4218, which I neglected to check last fall, was out of spec.
 
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