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Discussion Starter #1
There's always a lot of talk about 520 conversions with different size sprockets and the best gear ratios. Some stick with stock gearing while others go nuts with their gearing. I just thought I'd share my experience with three different gear ratios...

Here are the various setups I've had:
  • 525: 15/45
  • 525: 15/44
  • 520: 15/45
  • 520: 15/47[/list:u]

    525 - 15/45:

    This was the stock gearing. I didn't really have any problems with it - the bike accelerated fine and road nicely on the highway. However, this was a non-hunting ratio (on each revolution, a chain link meets with the same sprocket tooth everytime) - this can induce accelerated wear if one chain link or sprocket tooth is damaged.

    I read all the hype and propoganda about the 15/47 ration with a 520 kit, so I wanted to try it.

    520 - 15/47:

    Sprocket Specailists always seems way behind on their sprockets, so I was on a 45 tooth rear sprocket at first - I did get a 47 tooth sprocket later. The first thing I noticed was the bike was a bit peppier. The end of first gear showed up real quick. I was able to loft the front wheel easier in first and the front would come up occaisionally on the 1-2 upshift.

    However, after a while I realized that the ride wasn't as enjoyable. I was shifting more often and longer decreasing radius sweepers now required an upshift - many turns at right in between gears.

    Also, the engine was a bit more buzzier on the highway. With a vibration around 7000 RPM, my hands would go a bit numb after 35 minutes.

    525 - 15/44

    This is the stock gearing for the SVS and the gearing that I like most of all. I'm shifting less in the twisties - while I may not be going the fastest, I've been enjoying it more. The taller gear ratio seems to help smooth out the inherent drivetrain slop / fuel injection twitch. Also, the ratio is a hunting ratio - each link of the chain will eventually travel with each sprocket tooth.

    In longer turns, one gear normally will suffice. It seems that the taller gearing takes advantage of the wide power band that the SV is known for.

    On the highway, the engine turns about 5000 RPM at something like 68 mph. I always hold the speed limit on the interstates, so this works great for me. I don't know about mileage, as I haven't been checking that, but I'm sure it'll improve.


    So, in conclusuion, though a shorter final drive ratio may make your bike faster, it's not necessarily more enjoyable. There are many benefits to a taller gear ratio that I didn't initally realize. Maybe this will help other riders when considering a change in the final drive ratio.
 

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i recently went from 525 14/45 to a 520 15/46, and i think it is a pretty damn sweet set up. definately alot better than 14/45, but still i think maybe back to stock naked of 15/45, or maybe even 44 like you said avid, would be a better choice. im just tired of looking for that elusive 7th gear. the main thing that hold me is loss of the snap when accelerating. when my sprocket gets old, i think i may have to swap it out for the 44 and give that a shot. i dont do a whole lot of highway, so 15/46 works pretty well for me right now
 

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Interesting! There was another thread around here with a similiar conclusion. (found it, he went up to 16t in the front).

I am considering going down a tooth in the front, mostly for the quicker acceleration. I am also alot bigger than most other riders here (6'5, 250), so I thought I'd give it a shot.

But after reading your write up and chilihead's I might have to try both and see which gearing fits my riding style better.
 

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I had a shop change out my SVS gears to a lower ratio but they screwed up and gave me taller gears. I was upset about this at first, but after riding for a while I began to like it and decided not to cry to the shop.

Pros:
-At the time I had a girlfriend that was about 30 miles down the freeway so it made cruising a little more comfortable. 70mph in 6th gear is running at about 4900 rpms.
-I like the fact that I can use 1st gear much more around town and in tight corners (such as freeway underpass U-turns). This makes stop lights a little less of a hassle.
-I can just about hit 70mph in 2nd gear.

Cons:
-I miss that little extra "oomph"
-On really technical roads I feel in-between gears in the 30-50mph range.

Conclusion:
It would be perfect if I had 10 more hp. Since I don't use the superslab nearly as much these days, I will probably go back to stock gearing. For long commutes and some twisties (20-40mph) I think this gearing is better than stock. I am glad the shop screwed up though, because it let me see the benefits of higher gearing.
 

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well everyone likes it a certain way. i have an 02 s converted to naked and heres my gearing.

1down in the front and three up in the rear. conclusion: an absolute monster. shifting through gears it wqnats to pull your hands off the bars.
negatives: i went for a long ride on some big straight roads and at around 100mph it gets high up in the rpms. that kinda sucked but i dont normally do straight high speed runs.

as far as turns i never have a problem as to which gear im in cause the bike now pulls like a banshee even in 6th gear at 35mph. :lol:
 

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Hunting ratio and chain drive

15/45 with 108 or 110 links is not a non-hunting ratio. With gear drive it would be a non-hunting ratio since each tooth of the smaller gear sees the same three teeth on the large gear every revolution. With a chain you need to look at the link to sprocket tooth ratios on both sprockets. With 110 links in the chain 15/45 is true hunting since the ratios are repeating decimal numbers (110/15 = 7.3333....., 110/45 = 2.444...).

With 108 links you don't get a pure hunting ratio (108/15 = 7.2, 108/45 = 2.4). This means that the same link sees tooth
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oops, sorry, I was mistaken - thanks for clearing that up Andy. There isn't a whole lot of information about this concept easily located on the internet.
 

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Hunting ratio and chain drive

15/45 with 108 or 110 links is not a non-hunting ratio. With gear drive it would be a non-hunting ratio since each tooth of the smaller gear sees the same three teeth on the large gear every revolution. With a chain you need to look at the link to sprocket tooth ratios on both sprockets. With 110 links in the chain 15/45 is true hunting since the ratios are repeating decimal numbers (110/15 = 7.3333....., 110/45 = 2.444...).

With 108 links you don't get a pure hunting ratio (108/15 = 7.2, 108/45 = 2.4). This means that the same link on the chain sees tooth 1, 4, 7 and 10 on the small sprocket and tooth 1, 10, 19, 28 and 37 on the big sprocket. Any tooth on the small sprocket sees 36 of the chain's 108 links. Any tooth on the big sprocket sees 12 of the chain's 108 links.

Interestingly, for this combination it takes 5 complete chain passes before the chain repeats the series on either (or both) sprockets. Both the front and rear sprockets having the same chain repeat period.
 

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Oops, that's wrong

I'm rusty at repeating series math. I failed to note in the previous post that 15 and 110 have a common denominator, 5. So the series is longer but it still repeats and there are still some links that don't touch some sprocket teeth.

I also failed to mention that hunting or non-hunting is not as critical as many folks think. All gear drive and chain drive and belt drive cams in 4 cycle engines have, by necessity, non-hunting ratios of 2 to 1.
 
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