Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
8 cell - $100 w/ quick disconnects (street or track)
6 cell - $80 w/ quick disconnects (track)
4 cell - $60 w/ quick disconnects (not really recommended)

+ $15 usps priority.



 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,475 Posts
I'm thinking of non-moto uses for these.
How much space would the 4-cell require?
Can they be charged from a standard 12V source?
How many units do you have available?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
yep you can recharge 12-14v, which is similar to the charging system on a bike. I have over 60 a123 cells (26650). Here are rough dimensions from my phone:

I made one for my tocoma truck with 12 cells to get more cold cranking amps configured for 12v. In the past ive used an 8 cell to jump the Jurassic lead acid batteries for cars. I make my own configurations depending on the application. I ended up running my wires inside my truck with quick disconnection 50 amp terminals. The 50 amp terminals are over kill for these applications. A 30 amp terminal will do just as good.





"
Basics
These remarks apply equally to lithium ion and lithium polymer batteries. The chemistry is basically the same for the two types of batteries, so charging methods for lithium polymer batteries can be used for lithium-ion batteries.
Charging lithium iron phosphate 3.2 volt cells is identical, but the constant voltage phase is limited to 3.65 volts.

The lithium ion battery is easy to charge. Charging safely is a more difficult. The basic algorithm is to charge at constant current (0.2 C to 0.7 C depending on manufacturer) until the battery reaches 4.2 Vpc (volts per cell), and hold the voltage at 4.2 volts until the charge current has dropped to 10% of the initial charge rate. The termination condition is the drop in charge current to 10%. The top charging voltage and the termination current varies slightly with the manufacturer.

However, a charge timer should be included for safety.

The charge cannot be terminated on a voltage. The capacity reached at 4.2 Volts per cell is only 40 to 70% of full capacity unless charged very slowly. For this reason you need to continue to charge until the current drops, and to terminate on the low current.

It is important to note that trickle charging is not acceptable for lithium batteries. The Li-ion chemistry cannot accept an overcharge without causing damage to the cell, possibly plating out lithium metal and becoming hazardous.

Float charging, however, is a useful option. The safety issue with keeping the battery on constant charge is that if the charger should somehow go haywire and apply a higher voltage there could be problems. And, so the logic goes, the shorter the charger is turned on the less likely the charge will go haywire while connected to the battery. However, there is another safety method, the battery protection board, which should be included either on the battery or in other circuitry between the battery and the charger. The BPB (also known as PCB for "protection circuit board") or other battery management circuit will stop the charge if the voltage gets too high. " - power stream
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top