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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I recently redid a bunch of stuff (its been a long time comin) on the SV- new front spiegler brake lines, new fluid (i am at 23,000 and this stuff looked like some sort of pasty sludge... not sure how it was even working...) - new fork oil, and of course :) some Ricor Intiminators (which btw are amazing thank you).

After getting it all done, spent 45 minutes chasing some brake bleeding problems and probably 2 hours total in the Ricor job... and with dis/re assembly I spent about 5 hours total on my sidewalk (frame sliders + car jacks worked out quite well)

Got it all back together and road it around, everything feeling great, brakes and stopping power improved 10 fold and potholes were now smooth instead of bottoming out :) - today me and my girlfriend ride 26 miles out to my friends how to see his new puppy- we stopped down the street at a different friends house to meet up for a brief ride...

And as I start leaving his drive i way i got to stop and "squish" - no front brakes...

I take a look at the right side caliper- the piston side brake pad is just hanging down...

Should have snapped a picture of it... was terrifying.

Now for anyone removing their front wheel- I just figured I would post this because I didn't even notice it and its an easy thing to miss- when you bolt in the axle, make SURE the bolt is fulsh on BOTH sides... i torqued it into the left side fork and just closed up the pinch bolt- not realizing that it was actually inset (the head of the axle bolt) within the right side fork by about half an inch... this meant that the caliper was pulled away from the disc- allowing the piston side pad about half and inch of travel- i have no clue how it stayed on as long as it did and thank god it had...

Fixing this was a royal PITA - One question- does this happen normally? We had to pull the forks together with some rope and I tapped it with a hammer a few times to get it straight... it almost seems like perhaps the fork was bent?
I did check the straightness of the forks when I pulled them off for that job- they seemed dead on...

I do think that the left side disk would have offered some stopping power but only have a few pumps on the lever for the right side to fully compress the pistons...

Footnote- Thanks SVR though for the wealth of information (just overall) bought a supporting membership ... glad to be apart of the community :)
 

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Forks being left or right shouldn't change the calipers as they float on their mounts.

For your fork problem, try adding some grease to the axle and spacers hopefully the fork will stay in place as you tighten down. Having to muscle it back into place isn't normal so you need to figure out why it's gone wrong.

Try taking the front wheel off, and then rotating the upper fork tube 90 degrees and then see if the axle will go back in. If it does or gets worse, then you have a bent fork tube. If it stays the same then something else is the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Forks being left or right shouldn't change the calipers as they float on their mounts.

For your fork problem, try adding some grease to the axle and spacers hopefully the fork will stay in place as you tighten down. Having to muscle it back into place isn't normal so you need to figure out why it's gone wrong.

Try taking the front wheel off, and then rotating the upper fork tube 90 degrees and then see if the axle will go back in. If it does or gets worse, then you have a bent fork tube. If it stays the same then something else is the problem.
The forks not being in the right position "around" the wheel does directly (at least on my bike) affect how the calipers sit, the calipers are bolted to the fork, and the piston side was pulled AWAY from the brake disk meaning when the pistons compressed the just pushed the pad against nothing because they had more than a half inch to travel before even contacting the disk...

Not sure how to word it- I did try rotating the forks a bit while I had the wheel off- finding a straighter area didn't happen, it was just a tight fit to get it to compress properly... (the two forks in fully on the axle, obviously the left side screws in all the way, then getting the right side to "slide" was the trouble.

I wonder if grease would have helped a lot haha probably should have done that...

Its interesting because i got this 70 year old mechanic who does my tires, he pulled this wheel off last year and put it back on no problem IIRC...
 
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