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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys!
New to the forum.
I've primarily ridden old, standard Hondas with an upright seating position. Every parallel or *opposed v-twin I've had, I've been able to comfortably scrape the foot peg in turns comfortably.
I just recently bought a 2019 sv650x, with the clip on bars, and it felt pretty spindly in slow corners in first/second gear. I also have an 02 sv650 with standard bars which felt similar.
Anyways, while leaving my neighborhood the other day, I entered a corner at about 10-15mph, and while leaning in, my handle bars seemed to knife into the corner violently causing me to low side. Big ego bruise there.
I had the bike checked at the shop, and all the mechanical parts of the bike checked out okay, so I'm trying to see what I can do differently with my technique in low speed turns. It seems like every corner wants to eat me alive with the slightest lean.
I've checked the forums and can't find anything regarding low speed City driving, any tips would be hugely appreciated.
Thanks!
Ian
 

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On fresh tires I always felt the bike wants to fall into turns so I just gas my way out.
 

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I agree that it does feel like the bike wants to fall into turns, but I never thought of that as a bad thing ;-) It does take a few miles to get used to though after being on my bigger bike or my wifes cruiser.
 

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Is your front tire worn at all ? A worn front will make the bike fall in on slow corners. Possibly you just need to add a bit of gas when you commit to the turn. Also, consider putting in stiffer fork springs and/or heavier oil.

Mad
 

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Although the SV is a light, sporty bike that may feel a bit twitchy—especially if you are coming from larger bikes—it should never feel "violent" into the turns at any rate of speed. That is especially true since your bike is brand new and I'm guessing still has the stock suspension (hence stock geometry) and stock tires. The SV has gained lots of praise for its handling and predictability.

I am guessing you either hit a slippery patch or grabbed the front brake and slid your front tire. Or maybe you just need to learn the proper technique to ride, in which case I would suggest you take a basic or intermediate riding class.

Anyway, the SV should only require counter-weighing (with your body leaning to the outside of the turn) at speeds lower than 6 or 7 MPH. At 8-15 you should be OK staying neutral with the bike and, above that, you should start leaning your body into the turn.

Also remember, during any turn, at any speed, you need to stay on the gas or at least go back to the throttle (smoothly) as soon as possible. If you are coasting, or worse, if you chop the throttle mid turn, you will lose momentum very quickly and that may cause the bike to dive into the turn more than it should.

Be wise, get trained, ride safe.

- Ofir
 

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Ofir hit the nail on the head, and in some cases people traveling at a low rate of speed may “cover” the front brake, hit it and cause a very low speed low side without very much effort.

Could be there was a patch of something - gravel, tar, etc. and if you went to throttle up could have had a loss of traction that causes the bike to go over, forks extending in the process.

Turns should never be a surprise so you’ll want to set up for the turn you want to take in advance. That includes scanning for things that can effect traction, degree of turn, speed you’ll enter, etc. as well as setting your body and lane position.

For slower turns this will mean counter weighting the bike to keep it balanced, make a tighter turn, feel less likely to tip over (like you see people on the outside of those big racing catamarans trying to keep the boat from flipping).

Avoid the front brake if you can when at low speed, drag some rear brake if needed but be prepared to straighten up and stop, keeping in mind that turning and braking at the same time can create a loss of traction.

Leaning in on a slow turn can help the bike fall over, so if you’re accelerating to speed a neutral body position may work better.

Also take some time to make sure your suspension is set properly for your weight and riding style, practice on it as much as you can as many accidents for people of any experience are not so much the type of bike but how new that bike is to them - lacking experience, time in the saddle.

Good to be reflective about these kinds of events, you can use them as teachable moments - and always a good idea to invest in some quality training time, appropriate gear and sliders to keep the shiny bits off the pavement...
 

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Going down/up hill in a bank will get you in trouble....even at low speeds. Ask me how I know. Keep an eye on the angle of your road conditions.

Too much rear brakes will make the bike dive into your lean angle at low speeds. At higher speeds you will slide the rear into the turn.....which is kind of fun. My 2000 SV650 is notorious for this. Scared the Shinola out of me the first time it happened - leaned over, one handed, while waving at a fellow rider in a turn at a intersection. My 2011 GSXR 750 does not have this problem or my 2000 FJR (linked brakes, tho)
 

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I don't have seat time on a bunch of different bikes, probably less than 10 different models in all, but the engine braking on my SV (2017) is pretty agressive in the rpm range where the STVs are still closed, i.e. <5k-6k. It's easy to ride in those lower ranges because the bike makes good torque down low, but it seems to make the throttle extra sensitive. So now when I'm riding the twisties I keep my rpms up higher and my throttle control through turns is much smoother. I'm sure some of that is just me getting used to the bike over time, but it's something to consider.
 
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