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So I took my bike in for its 7500 mile check up and get a call that my front tire needs replaced, but the back still has some life left. This seems odd to me because I thought the rear tires would wear down faster then the front. An I just wrong or is this a sign of something that is wrong with the bike?
 

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May or may not mean anything. Too many factors are involved: riding style, front vs rear brake use, throttle usage, inflation pressures, load weight & distribution, inflation pressures, etc.

Most front tires have less tread, but wear slower than the rears. Ideally, they wear out at the same time, but real life is often different.

I wouldn't worry, but I'd check wear and pressures somewhat regularly.

FWIW, if you are on the stock Dunlops, it may be a blessing to just swap both tires out for better quality replacements.
 

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Usually, the back wears at a little less than 2x rate of the front.

However, this depends on the abrasiveness and crowning of the roads you regularly ride, how much is straight-ahead slabbing it versus attacking the twisties, your weight and the weight of all of the stuff you regularly carry on the bike (and where you carry it), air pressure in the tires, whether you're gentle or aggressive with the throttle and/or the brakes, whether you use the back brake too or just the front, etc.

Is the wear pattern on the front tire even, or is there more wear in the center, the sides, on one side, etc.? Higher wear in the center may be over-inflation; higher wear on both sides may be under-inflation. If the wear is more on one side than the other, check your fork for one leg lower than the other through the triples. Make sure the wheel is perpendicular to the ground. Is there cupping, waviness, or other indications of a suspension problem? Have you properly set the sag and are you using the correct springs for your riding weight?
 

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Slightly higher wear to the left of center could just be from the crown in the road, but I'd check to make sure that both fork legs were aligned correctly.

+1 on the PR3's. I have the PR2's, and am very satisfied with them (so far). My understanding is the the 3's have all of the 2's goodness, plus even better wet-weather traction.
 

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Sell son, buy PR3's.



Sent from my left shoe using the Motorcycle app
 

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It's not the crown in the road, it's the fact that we're on the right side of the road so we spend more time on the left side of the tire than the right.
Aren't we saying the same thing?

Riding on the right side of the road = riding on the right side of the crown = leaning slightly left = greater tire wear on the left side.
 

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Nah, this is a little different. Yes, a crowned road probably does make a slight impact in uneven wear, but think of the additional distance covered when making a left turn vs a right. From a stop sign, a left turn is about twice as long as a right. Every left turn you take will be longer than its complimentary right. Even if roads were perfectly flat, that wears the left side of the tire a lot more than a crown in a road which is only equal to a couple degrees of lean.
 

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Nah, I'm talking about something different. Yes, a crowned road probably does make a slight impact in uneven wear, but think of the additional distance covered when making a left turn vs a right. From a stop sign, a left turn is about twice as long as a right. Every left turn you take will be longer than its complimentary right. Even if roads were perfectly flat, that wears the left side of the tire a lot more than a crown in a road which is only equal to a couple degrees of lean.
+1
 
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