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I finished my 30 hour MSA course today and got my 'part license.' No riding at night or with a passenger. It was a great course recommended to me by many people and great reviews: 2 days of theory, 2 days of parking lot, and 2 separate day rides. We learnt on 250cc Sherpa's, and today I took out my SV for my maiden voyage.
I was definitely a bit nervous taking the SV out for the first time. I had no motorcycle experience before starting the course. I just took it very slow, and focused on the techniques they taught us, namely: squeezing with my knees and keeping my arms and body loose, looking where I want to go, and being smooth with the inputs. Even after an hour of riding I feel much more confident. I have no problem finding and feeling the clutch engagement point and am getting a good feel for the brakes. I had a way harder time keeping a good grip on the bike vs the Sherpa, which makes sense since the Sherpa's gas tank if much narrower. I'm going to invest in some tank grips very, very soon so hopefully that will give me more grip on the bike and better control.
Still having trouble (as in the course) with smooth downshifting. I have trouble applying the throttle consistently as I'm letting out the clutch, and braking. I'm either over revving, or not giving any throttle at all, which causes my body to lurch forward and feel unstable. Also due to me letting out the clutch too quickly. Hopefully practice will help me with this!
Anyways, loving the SV after our first short ride. My goal will be to get better and feel more confident each time I go out. Off to read some more articles on the site about riding techniques!
 

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I passed the MSF course late June never being on a bike before that and ride my bandit every day now with alot of confidence. It takes practice and repetition like everything else in life but before you know it youll look down at the odometer and see you put 2k miles on it and wonder "when did that happen?" haha
 

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Congrats on your graduation. Practice what you have learned. It sounds like you have a good foundation for safe riding. Also, remember, never stop learning.
 

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Congrats on getting out there and riding! Welcome to a fantastic community and you're on a great bike for either a learning rider or one with hundreds of hours of racing under their belt.

Don't worry about being lurchy and struggling to tame the SV; it's a difficult beast to tame and even though I have some 6+ years experience riding, my new SV is teaching me new things all over again. It's a big ol' lumpy engine that needs a bit of finessing to "work" well.

Practice some of the things that you learned in your course. Find yourself an empty parking lot or dead-end road where you'll be safe and practice learning where you find the point at which the clutch picks up smoothly as you feed it throttle. Learning where and how large the friction zone is on the SV will help you both with taking off and will do worlds to help smooth out your downshifting.

I come an from inline-4 and parallel-twin background, so everything has been butter smooth compared to the SV. Now I'm learning how to quickly, though gently feed out clutch as I downshift to the point where I'm getting virtually no lurching.

And wow, 30 hours? That's one heck of a class! Our basic MSF course here in the states is I think 8 hours over two days; 2 or 3 in the classroom and the rest out on the course learning hands-on theory and practice.

Just remember, you can read until your eyes bleed, but nothing replaces experience. Riding is a constantly evolving and constantly expanding learning experience. Get out there and have fun! :)
 

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Why not just rev match?
You can, but it's often more of an effort to continuously blip the throttle than to smoothly feed the clutch in and out. It can also upset handling if you aren't careful. And given something with as much engine braking as a 90 degree V-Twin has, rev-matching mid-corner or on dirty ground can be a hairy prospect whereas using the clutch is easy(ier) and allows you to get braking or acceleration applied smoothly.

It's very important to understand that the clutch is not an on-off switch. Before slipper clutches let people be lazy, all you had was your clutch hand and the lever.

Also, going around blipping your throttle all the time isn't very polite to other riders, drivers, or your neighbors. They might get the wrong idea of what you're doing or trying to do and you'll end up like the Harley guys with their straight pipes roaring around "Look at me! Look at me!"

That's not to say that I don't rev-match quite a bit, especially for downshifts on the freeway or coming off the freeway, but I would rather know and understand how to correctly use my clutch and tend to use and abuse it to give me maximum control.
 

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You can, but it's often more of an effort to continuously blip the throttle than to smoothly feed the clutch in and out. It can also upset handling if you aren't careful. And given something with as much engine braking as a 90 degree V-Twin has, rev-matching mid-corner or on dirty ground can be a hairy prospect whereas using the clutch is easy(ier) and allows you to get braking or acceleration applied smoothly.

It's very important to understand that the clutch is not an on-off switch. Before slipper clutches let people be lazy, all you had was your clutch hand and the lever.

Also, going around blipping your throttle all the time isn't very polite to other riders, drivers, or your neighbors. They might get the wrong idea of what you're doing or trying to do and you'll end up like the Harley guys with their straight pipes roaring around "Look at me! Look at me!"

That's not to say that I don't rev-match quite a bit, especially for downshifts on the freeway or coming off the freeway, but I would rather know and understand how to correctly use my clutch and tend to use and abuse it to give me maximum control.
Oh ok, I was just curious; I do it 99% of the time because thats just how I learned too shift. I guess I dont **** too many people off with my quiet stock exhaust. I always felt blipping to be smoother and more controllable once you get the hang of it. I can feed the clutch out smoothly but just never really liked it too much past parking lot and slowish speed maneuvers. To each his own I guess.
 

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Oh ok, I was just curious; I do it 99% of the time because thats just how I learned too shift. I guess I dont **** too many people off with my quiet stock exhaust. I always felt blipping to be smoother and more controllable once you get the hang of it. I can feed the clutch out smoothly but just never really liked it too much past parking lot and slowish speed maneuvers. To each his own I guess.
That's true, stock it is only about as loud as an asthmatic track runner.

Now you've got me thinking. I'm going to pay attention during my ride home and see how often I do it. :vroom:
 

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You can, but it's often more of an effort to continuously blip the throttle than to smoothly feed the clutch in and out....
Wow. So much misinformation.

Let's start with the fact that rev-matching IS using the clutch correctly.

Let's end with... If you're doing it right, why would you care what a few misinformed idiots think you're doing?

And everything else in between is wrong, too.
 

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Wow...... In America, if i ride two days in a carpark-and 2 little drives- I can get on any bike I like,and ill get a 650s because its a 'beginner bike'. Tell me this is a joke.
So many thoughts..

Insurance?
18yr old on an R1???
Get over an Msf course- lads, it takes time to be able to ride well.
Poor poor poor standard of 'licensed' drivers
more squidage.

Can someone please set me straight-give out to me for being mean and put my mind at rest, tell me this isnt true. that in the States- I can basically hop on any bike i like if i pass a course. I saw Justin Beiber on a 848 for god sake-his balls havent even dropped.

IM SICK OF IT!
 

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Wow...... In America, if i ride two days in a carpark-and 2 little drives- I can get on any bike I like,and ill get a 650s because its a 'beginner bike'. Tell me this is a joke.
So many thoughts..

Insurance?
18yr old on an R1???
Get over an Msf course- lads, it takes time to be able to ride well.
Poor poor poor standard of 'licensed' drivers
more squidage.

Can someone please set me straight-give out to me for being mean and put my mind at rest, tell me this isnt true. that in the States- I can basically hop on any bike i like if i pass a course. I saw Justin Beiber on a 848 for god sake-his balls havent even dropped.

IM SICK OF IT!
Often the carpark training is optional.

One can easily:

1. Write license test
2. Walk to dealership, buy litre bike
Optional: helmet (depending on state)
Optional: insurance (depending on state)

Unfortunately in North America motorcycles are considered pleasure vehicles (for the most part) and not as a means of transportation.
 

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As explained to me previously by OreoGabaro .. revmatching doesn't mean you don't use the clutch to smooth out the downshift .. its used to reduce the time you actually have to be in the friction zone smoothing things out.
 

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Wow. So much misinformation.

Let's start with the fact that rev-matching IS using the clutch correctly.

Let's end with... If you're doing it right, why would you care what a few misinformed idiots think you're doing?

And everything else in between is wrong, too.
Agreed, you have to rev match when shifting either way.

If someone is having problems shifting then they need more parking lot time to learn how to use the clutch. Learning how to use the friction zone is essential to riding, especially on a bike with some torque.
 

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Hi bcSV650, nice to read about how your first ride on the SV650 felt. I recently drove my SV650s for the first time. Took it from Amersfoort to Amsterdam (you know: The Netherlands, Europe, Red Light District, free drugs for all and more of that nonsense ;)). I remember my first mile thinking: "Why is my bike shaking so much, are my wheels not aligned properly?" before I realised that it actually was my heart pounding in my throat :)
It was a cold (35F) and very foggy day with visibility <100 yards and there I was on the freeway moving my head from right to left from time to time to get the water off my visor. Riding a bike in Amsterdam, like in any city with tram lines and a lot of construction work, is tasking and challenging. And because the freeway is totally congested most of the time (the reason I sold my car in the first place) it is quite challenging to navigate the traffic jams too (which here in The Netherlands is allowed with minimal speed difference).

Anyway what I've learned in this short time is to keep your mind and eyes on the road and not focus too much on perfect gear shifts in the beginning. Especially not when in heavy traffic :)

See ya!
 
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