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I'm bak again. army changed its view on motorcycled since I left so no riding yet plus it is freezing balls out here in TN. starting build today so a thread in build will follow. thankd for all the support through that desert hell again.
 

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Nice! Welcome back!
 

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Welcome home! Glad you're back safe.
 

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Glad you are back home, safe.
 

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Welcome back CONUS man.
 

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So why can't you ride? Army won't let you?
The military has gotten hyper paranoid lately about riders due to a high number of deaths. We now have to take even more classes and fill out even more forms in order to ride.
 

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SV Hadder
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The military has gotten hyper paranoid lately about riders due to a high number of deaths. We now have to take even more classes and fill out even more forms in order to ride.
i wouldn't call it paranoia. the percentage of soldier motorcycle deaths is like 5 times the national average when compared to civilian motorcycle deaths.
 

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The military has gotten hyper paranoid lately about riders due to a high number of deaths. We now have to take even more classes and fill out even more forms in order to ride.
Ah... righto... the reasoning behind taking all those classes in parking lots at speeds approaching 45mph. Real world stuff. Gotcha. :thumbsup:

(My info comes from people like Harsh, who have had to take these laughable classes)
 

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i wouldn't call it paranoia. the percentage of soldier motorcycle deaths is like 5 times the national average when compared to civilian motorcycle deaths.
Just to nitpick a little bit, but what is that based on? Ie, the percentage of GI deaths compared to all GIs (I'm assuming) vs the percentage of civilian deaths compared to all civilians. I ask, because I'm guessing there is a higher percentage of riders in the military as well, so I wonder if the death rate is much different statistically.

To point out the hoops to jump through, to get my Sheppard AFB Motorcycle Safety Training Card, I had to have previously taken an MSF class (no biggie), but after getting on base, fill out a form with bike info and my experience. I then signed it, got my supervisor to sign it, my squadron commander to sign it, and the motorcycle safety officer to sign it. At that point, I got the little green safety card, that I again had to sign, as did my squadron commander, the motorcycle safety officer, and the wing motorcycle monitor for the whole base. But now I can bring my bike on base, so that's good.

/jack.
 

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So did they question any of the info on the form (i.e. ammount of experience), or did they just sign it?

Not picking on you, but if all they have to do is sign it, then it's not a very good system. Sh-t, in that case, I could go out, buy a Hayabusa, simply say that I had 10 years of experience, and as long as I got all the required signatures, I'm fully "safe" to ride on base.

Because of the large military presence around here, I see a LOT of military folks on bikes. Now, I also know a lot of military folks on bikes, who are very competant, intelligent, and mature riders. So I hate to judge one group. But I can't tell you how many times I've seen people do stupid sh-t, or simply look as though they're "struggling" to control a bike, and are wearing BDU's. It's nothing short of scary.
 

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SV Hadder
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Just to nitpick a little bit, but what is that based on? Ie, the percentage of GI deaths compared to all GIs (I'm assuming) vs the percentage of civilian deaths compared to all civilians. I ask, because I'm guessing there is a higher percentage of riders in the military as well, so I wonder if the death rate is much different statistically./jack.
no, the number of deaths of motorcyclists who are in the military is 5 times higher than the number of non-military motorcyclists deaths.

you're more likely to die on a motorcycle if you're in the military- statistically. The highest number of fatalities are riders returning home from war and trying to replace the adrenaline rush that they lack from being out of a war zone.
 

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no, the number of deaths of motorcyclists who are in the military is 5 times higher than the number of non-military motorcyclists deaths.

you're more likely to die on a motorcycle if you're in the military- statistically. The highest number of fatalities are riders returning home from war and trying to replace the adrenaline rush that they lack from being out of a war zone.
That, and the fact that you have young people with lots of money, and little experience operating a vehicle.
 

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That, and the fact that you have young people with lots of money, and little experience operating a vehicle.
Exactly. If you take young guys, send them overseas, get them shot at, then bring them home with a lot of cash in their pocket they feel invincible. It sucks but we do have a lot of rider deaths. And as for getting all the forms signed, you have your records reviewed during this process to see if you're prone to getting tickets, accidents, etc. to see if the military will let you ride. I guess they hope if they make you jump through enough hoops and do record checks on people they won't have as many kids buying bikes on a whim and getting killed.

Once again, welcome back stateside man. Getting all the signatures sucks (especially because CC's have better things to do, like golf) but you'll be back on the road soon.
 

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There's probably a better place to discuss this, so if there's interest, let's start a new thread or something (ASC, Zach, or any others).

Zach, thanks for clarifying those stats a bit further. I just get wary of any stats talking about rates/percentages since they are dependent on what they are being compared too.

So did they question any of the info on the form (i.e. ammount of experience), or did they just sign it?
Yes, but not fully.

Not picking on you, but if all they have to do is sign it, then it's not a very good system. Sh-t, in that case, I could go out, buy a Hayabusa, simply say that I had 10 years of experience, and as long as I got all the required signatures, I'm fully "safe" to ride on base.
Valid points, and to some extent I'm sure asking questions/verifying the form depends on the commander/safety monitor. I think the truthful filling out of the form is something that's also likely to be dependent on the person wanting a bike on base. The military has a much heavier emphasis on trust/integrity than other professions (probably not unlike the ethic of being a surveyor), so the thought to lie on a form like that just wouldn't occur to me. On the other hand, it might to a fresh recruit whose 18-20 and has some money (one of the folks that you described perhaps).

Because of the large military presence around here, I see a LOT of military folks on bikes. Now, I also know a lot of military folks on bikes, who are very competant, intelligent, and mature riders. So I hate to judge one group. But I can't tell you how many times I've seen people do stupid sh-t, or simply look as though they're "struggling" to control a bike, and are wearing BDU's. It's nothing short of scary.
Yeah, don't really doubt you there, but haven't personally seen it myself yet. My guess is that stems from the culture (or testorone) of the military world, ie, driving fast cars, drinking, motorcycles, so I'm sure there are untrained folks out there who do it regardless.
 
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