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Thinking about a Zero or the like?
https://electrek.co/2018/02/09/ev-charging-credit-extended-2018
Today, Congress took action to extend several tax credits, and among them were credits for EV charging infrastructure, fuel cell vehicles and electric motorcycles.

A lot of people know about the $7,500 federal tax credit for electric vehicle purchases, but there are a number of other incentives available to EV buyers which help to offset initial costs. These include today’s newly-extended 30% rebate (up to $1,000) on costs associated with the installation of an EV charging station, a 10% credit (up to $2,500) on 2- or 3-wheeled electric vehicles such as electric motorcycles, and a $4,000 credit for the purchase of a new fuel cell vehicle.

These credits had previously expired at the end of 2016, and today were extended retroactively through the end of 2018. Anyone who purchased an electric motorcycle, a fuel cell vehicle, or spent money on a charging installation in 2017 or who does any of those things in 2018 can qualify for these credits on their 2017 or 2018 tax return.
 

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How is this a good thing? The gov't spending MORE money that it doesn't have. Eventually, nat'l debt will collapse the economy, and foreigners will be here with their cash to buy up what's left for pennies on the $.
 

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Just another way for the rich to pay less taxes, eh? That's definitely the case.

But if you're looking to buy a Zero, it's a good thing, All I'm sayin'
 

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Well my joke as I see it, is there are plenty of things the government is wasteful about...
But your right that's not the topic.
I for one think giving incentives to help push start an industry that we all need is important. I pay taxes too,and maybe I'm naive but it seems pushing alternatives to fossil fuel is the future. Not staying stagnate and relying on old technologies like fossil fuels. The world is changing,whether we like it or not.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
 

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That's a mouth full of empty platitudes. Please cite the clause of the Constitution that gives the Federal Gov't legal authority to do this.

It's not a tax, and it certainly isn't "interstate commerce."

I have a super duper secret for you...those electric cars and motorcycles...run on electricity....generated in power plants....that burn FOSSIL FUELS. They are also chock full of non-recyclable hazardous waste.

If you want to push "alternatives," then spend your own money doing it! It's just too easy to dig into the taxpayer coffers for pet projects.
 

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The switch to renewable energy is not a "pet project" but a prudent investment in light of the trillions of dollars of potential damage with continuing our CO2 emission levels at the current pace. You may disagree, but this debate is effectively over since the Paris Agreement 2015 (I would argue since Kyoto in 1992). If you disagree with that I really can't help you. It's like talking to a flat earther at this point.
Just my 2 cents:
  • Government incentives for adoption of new technologies have a long and legitimate history; there would be no nuclear energy without insurance underwriting by the government; fossil fuel industries have been receiving yearly subsidies of $4.7 billion, a highly profitable and mature industry that surely does not need them (U.S. profits in 2015: $257 billion)
  • I agree that the EV tax credit may be a bit high (I found a study claiming a $2,500 credit would reflect the added public benefit more accurately), and to let them expire in 2016, only to retroactively grant them for 2017, and possibly nix them in 2018 again, has no effect on incentivizing people to buy those cars, but only rewarding people who would have bought them anyways. On the other hand it is a limited incentive (only the first 200,000 cars of each manufacturer receive it).
  • Most of the electricity in the U.S. is from natural gas, renewable, and nuclear energy. Coal accounts for 32% and is falling. Compared to burning oil these are relatively low or near zero emission technologies in regards to Global Warming.
    Also, burning oil in your car you only convert about 20% into power at the wheel, most of it is converted to heat. Modern gas powered plants have a conversion efficiency of around 40%, the electricity is distributed without pollution, and an all-electric car has an efficiency of about 60%, in addition it generates electricity anytime you step on the brakes and has an MPGe of 120-130. The batteries can be recycled fully and there's an incentive to do so since Lithium is expensive (even standard lead-acid batteries have a recycling rate of 99%). So from an efficiency perspective it is superior, but the fact that the adoption is slow is a classic case for market intervention in order to spur mass production and adoption.
  • Maybe we should look at the bigger picture as well: Dept. of Defense budget for 2018 is $574 billion, plus emergency funding for cost of wars is $65 billion. Combined that is 51% of the entire discretionary budget (i.e. everything but Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid). The U.S. operates 11 aircraft carriers at a cost of $10 billion each and yearly operating costs of 2-4 billion each (!). China and Italy have two, all other countries have 1 or 0. I'd say let's focus on the big ticket items and argue about the usefulness of them with equal passion.
My build thread http://is.gd/sv650sascha | Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/sv650nyc
 

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The switch to renewable energy is not a "pet project" but a prudent investment in light of the trillions of dollars of potential damage with continuing our CO2 emission levels at the current pace. You may disagree, but this debate is effectively over since the Paris Agreement 2015 (I would argue since Kyoto in 1992). If you disagree with that I really can't help you. It's like talking to a flat earther at this point.
Just my 2 cents:
  • Government incentives for adoption of new technologies have a long and legitimate history; there would be no nuclear energy without insurance underwriting by the government; fossil fuel industries have been receiving yearly subsidies of $4.7 billion, a highly profitable and mature industry that surely does not need them (U.S. profits in 2015: $257 billion)
  • I agree that the EV tax credit may be a bit high (I found a study claiming a $2,500 credit would reflect the added public benefit more accurately), and to let them expire in 2016, only to retroactively grant them for 2017, and possibly nix them in 2018 again, has no effect on incentivizing people to buy those cars, but only rewarding people who would have bought them anyways. On the other hand it is a limited incentive (only the first 200,000 cars of each manufacturer receive it).
  • Most of the electricity in the U.S. is from natural gas, renewable, and nuclear energy. Coal accounts for 32% and is falling. Compared to burning oil these are relatively low or near zero emission technologies in regards to Global Warming.
    Also, burning oil in your car you only convert about 20% into power at the wheel, most of it is converted to heat. Modern gas powered plants have a conversion efficiency of around 40%, the electricity is distributed without pollution, and an all-electric car has an efficiency of about 60%, in addition it generates electricity anytime you step on the brakes and has an MPGe of 120-130. The batteries can be recycled fully and there's an incentive to do so since Lithium is expensive (even standard lead-acid batteries have a recycling rate of 99%). So from an efficiency perspective it is superior, but the fact that the adoption is slow is a classic case for market intervention in order to spur mass production and adoption.
  • Maybe we should look at the bigger picture as well: Dept. of Defense budget for 2018 is $574 billion, plus emergency funding for cost of wars is $65 billion. Combined that is 51% of the entire discretionary budget (i.e. everything but Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid). The U.S. operates 11 aircraft carriers at a cost of $10 billion each and yearly operating costs of 2-4 billion. China and Italy have two, all other countries have 1 or 0. I'd say let's focus on the big ticket items and argue about the usefulness of them with equal passion.
My build thread http://is.gd/sv650sascha | Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/sv650nyc
Checkmate!
 

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That's a mouth full of empty platitudes. Please cite the clause of the Constitution that gives the Federal Gov't legal authority to do this.

It's not a tax, and it certainly isn't "interstate commerce."

I have a super duper secret for you...those electric cars and motorcycles...run on electricity....generated in power plants....that burn FOSSIL FUELS. They are also chock full of non-recyclable hazardous waste.

If you want to push "alternatives," then spend your own money doing it! It's just too easy to dig into the taxpayer coffers for pet projects.
We obviously see things in a different light.
Enjoy the rest of your day.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
 

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Checkmate!
Someone blending random facts with a whole lot of half truths and politicized statements, coupled with a casual insult, does not equal checkmate.

Calling someone a flat earther is pathetic and disingenuous. I take it you believe Steve Goddard and John Coleman were flat earthera then, if you even know who they are.

Newsflash, natural gas is a hydrocarbon, so even if your silly warming political theory were true, it produces CO2. Let's not let facts get in the way.

Modern gas cars have efficiencies over 30pct, diesel even higher. .6 x .4 is not that great, sorry, you're trying to obscure reality with your ideals. Your 20 pct number comes from Google, hardly the authority on thermodynamic efficiency. Just because Google or Wikipedia says so, doesn't actually make it a fact.
 
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