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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Suzuki Manual:

ENGINE OIL

Suzuki recommends the use of SUZUKI PERFORMANCE 4 MOTOR OIL or an oil which is rated SF or SG under the API (American Petroleum Institute) classification system. The viscosity rating should be SAE 10W-40. If an SAE 10W-40 oil is not available, select an alternative according to the information below:

-4°F - 86°F: 10W-30
-4°F - 104°F+: 10W-40, 10W-50
6°F - 104°F+: 15W-40, 15W-50
14°F - 104°F+: 20W-50

Engine life depends on oil amount and quality. Daily oil level checks and periodic changes are two of the most important maintenance itmes to be performed.

Engine Oil Level Check
  • Place the motorcycle on level ground on the side stand.
  • Start the engine and allow it to idle for a few minutes.
  • Stop the engine and wait approximately three minutes.
  • Hold the motorcycle vertically and check the oil level through the oil level inspection window on the right side of the engine. the engine oil level should be between "L" (low) and "F" (full) lines.
Engine Oil and Filter Change
Change the engine oil and oil filter at the scheduled times. The engine should always be warm (140°F or more) when the oil is changed so the oil will drain easily and completely. The procedure is as follows:
  • Place the motorcycle on the side stand.
  • Remove the oil filler cap.
  • Remove the drain plug from the bottom of the engine and drain the engine oil into a drain pan.
  • Reinstall the drain plug and gasket. Tighten the plug securely with a wrench.
  • Turn the oil filter counterclockwise and remove it with a Suzuki "cap type" filter wrench of proper size. [Many strap wrenches will work fine - if you installed your filter by hand, you should be able to remove it by hand. If you have troubles removing the filter, some suggest pounding a screwdriver (that's your not too fond of) into the filter and and then turning it]
  • Wipe off the moutning surface on the engine where the new filter will be sealed with a clean rag.
  • Smear a little engine oil around the rubber gasket of the new oil filter.p [Making sure that the old oil filter gasket is not in place]
  • Screw on the new filter by hand until the filter gasket contacts the mounting surface (a small resistance will be felt).
  • Mark the top dead center position on the "cap type" filter wrench or on the oil filter. Use an oil filter wrench to tighten the filter 2 360° turns.
  • Reinstall the drain plug and tighten it securely. Pour about 2700 ml (2.9 US qt) of the specified engine oil in the filler hole.
  • Reinstall the oil filler cap.
  • Start the engine and allow it to idle for a few minutes.
  • Turn the engine off and wait approximately one minute. Recheck the oil level in the engine oil inspection window. The engine oil should be at the "F" (full) mark. If it is lower than the "F" makr, add oil until it reaches the "F" mark. Inspect the area around the drain plug and oil filter for leaks.
Here's a tip. You can tighten the oil filter hand tight (difficult to turn with one hand) and forgo using an oil filter wrench. This will allow you to twist the filter off with your hand at the next change.

Per Suzuki recommendation, engine oil should be changed every 3500 miles. The oil filter should be changed every other oil change.

Some riders change their oil more often than 3500 miles. More frequent oil changes have not proven to prolong the SV engine life. However, proactive maintenance will never hurt. For some, more frequent changes may allow one to realize a lubrication problem sooner. Although this is not likely, it's certainly possible.

Many people change the filter during every oil change. While this is not required or necessary, many agree that it is "cheap insurance."

Here are a few links you may want to peruse before posting a question to this Oil FAQ:

Motorcycle Motor Oil: http://www.gis.net/~manjo/motorcycle_motor_oil.htm

All About Oil: http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.html

Motorcycle Oils vs. Automotive Oils: http://www.xs11.com/stories/mcnoil94.htm

Oil Filters Exposed!: http://www.twocreeks.net/toby/oil_filters/index.shtml

Multi-viscocity is the way to go: http://www.lincolnsonline.com/article105.html



What do I think about the topic?

Find a decent cheap oil, whether it be Rotella, Castrol, Valvoline, Mobile 1 - as long as it doesn't have friction modifiers, it will serve your purpose just fine. I have a hard time believing people that tell me they can feel a difference between oils. Good and often maintenance will have a much more substantial effect on the longevity of your bike than finding the "best" brand of oil.

Shell Rotella is a diesel oil. However, the properties of many diesel oils prove ideal (not necessarily superior) for motorcycle engines. For more information on this, please consult the following (from the Shell Rotella website: http://www.rotella.com/qa/answerresult.php?rowid=81)

Rotella Website said:
Can heavy-duty diesel oil be used in motorcycles?

Motorcycle gasoline engines may not seem in the same league as the big displacement diesel engine under your hood, but they share some of the same lubrication requirements. So yes, in many cases, a premium heavy-duty universal oil capable of serving both diesel and gasoline engines is the best choice for your bike.
The high power-to-displacement ratio of a motorcycle engine means rod and main bearings are subjected to loads that are not normally found in passenger car engines. The valve train is also highly loaded, and requires extreme pressure boundary lubrication. The same can be said about gears in the transmission, which are normally lubricated by engine oil. Oil additives containing phosphorus protect these highly loaded extreme pressure areas (in both gasoline and diesel engines). Because diesel engines have higher loading of components, more of the phosphorus-containing additive is present than in typical passenger car oils. And with advanced catalyst systems for gasoline engines, the phosphorus content has been declining in passenger car oils.

Since many bike engines are air-cooled, and tend to be operated at high power outputs and speeds, their lubricating oil needs to be more resistant to high temperature oxidation. That?s another advantage of a premium universal oil. Another thing you want in your motorcycle is oil that has excellent viscosity control, so that with use it retains high temperature viscosity. Some multiviscosity grade passenger car oils, subjected to extreme loads, can quickly thin out. Their viscosity can drop to the next lower grade.

One last thing to consider is whether oil contains friction modifier additives. For improved fuel economy, most passenger car oils have such an additive. But the wet clutch in your bike doesn?t perform right with friction modifiers. Universal engine oils don?t have friction modifiers.

Be careful choosing diesel oils. Not all of them are universal. In addition to the API Service Category CI-4 for diesels, look for API Service Category SL.

Premium universal oils like Shell ROTELLA® T Multigrade are formulated for heavy-duty performance, and your bike engine has some heavy-duty challenges for oil. For optimum performance, be sure your oil is up to the challenge.
Sure, you can purchase Amsoil, Motul, Royal Purple, or any of those other high end motor oils. What harm will it do? Absolutely nothing. Sure, you're paying a lot more for (arguably) unproven results, but if it really gives you that much piece of mind, then by all means, spend $10/quart for your oil.

The truth of the matter is that there are plenty of members here with high mileage bikes (some with 110,000+ miles) that are using regular old dino oil and haven't had a single oil related problem with their motorcycles. If you would like to use more expensive oils, go for it, but realize that you may not be paying for additional protection.
 

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What about filters? Is there a list? Are they the same for 1st gen and 2nd gen?
The oil filter is the same for 99-07 bikes as well as the SV1000. Here's a list of part numbers:

Suzuki: 16510-03G00-X07
K&N: KN138
FRAM: PH6018
Amsoil: SMF 109
Champion: PH7016
Emgo: 10-55662 or 10-55660
Hi-Flo: HF138
J.C.Whitney: ZX063166P
NAPA: 1359
WIX: 51359
Per-Form: J-509
ProPart: 01-0029
Purolator: ML16818
STP: SMO-18
VESRAH: VSF-3009

Take your pick, they all perform about the same. Many will tell you to avoid Fram, but chances are they know nothing about oil filters.

I use the K&N filter because it has a molded in hex head which makes it very easy to get off in the case that you can't spin it off by hand. If the K&N is unavailable, I pick up a Fram or equivalent from Wal-Mart.
 

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Post from andyauger:

When the "new" diesel-specific oil formulations hit the market I heard about flat tappet problems. I did a little research and read literally dozens of threads in different sites about how the additive changes have caused or could cause failures in flat tappet engines. This struck me as odd for a couple of reasons.

First, additives like ZDDP don't really do anything under normal circumstances. The point of lubricating oil systems is to keep an oil film between moving parts. Only if the film is lost do "extreme pressure" additives provide any benefit. But the base stocks and blends hadn't changed, so the changes in additives were not a likely source of the problem.

Second, the oils had just hit the market, so if there already were dozens of failures then the failures should escalate into the thousands very quickly. Typical to myths they stayed about the same. "I heard that" and "Someone told me", etc.

Third, test reports showed the newer formulations surpass the older ones under severe service. When I asked the chemist about the "problem" he said yeah, he heard of the issue before the oils were even sold.

So now a couple of months down the road the scope of the "problem" has not changed, implying that there is no problem. Time will tell, but I bet that five years from now people will still be complaining because someone they knew heard that someone they knew had a problem.
 

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u seem quite knowlegdable so here is my speel so to speak....
i have a 02 ram...duh quite different right, well i went from castrol gt hd 30 with fram oil filter...dyno'd at 286 (with CAI and micromax tuner with cherry bomb true duel) to royal purple with lucas syn additive for viscosity and a high flow k&n gold filter and then dyno'd again at 298! With this in mind shouldn' t the same be true for my sv or do i have a misconception in the way a motorcycle engine works? in theory less resistance means less load, hence more power to tire, not that the sv needs it or anything. I think i might dyno the sv and change to see if there's any difference
 

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tmg, i use lucas in all my cars (as in past and present, only own a subaru now). it's the ****.

i would not compare a motorcycle engine to a car engine. they're just so different. especially when it comes to lubrication. if you have access to a dyno, then dyno your bike with different oils. that'd be sweet to see those charts.

as far as this thread, it's a goldmine. thanks to OP for this. it's definitely one of the most informative oil threads i've found on the various forums i read. thanks again
 

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u seem quite knowlegdable so here is my speel so to speak....
i have a 02 ram...duh quite different right, well i went from castrol gt hd 30 with fram oil filter...dyno'd at 286 (with CAI and micromax tuner with cherry bomb true duel) to royal purple with lucas syn additive for viscosity and a high flow k&n gold filter and then dyno'd again at 298! With this in mind shouldn' t the same be true for my sv or do i have a misconception in the way a motorcycle engine works? in theory less resistance means less load, hence more power to tire, not that the sv needs it or anything. I think i might dyno the sv and change to see if there's any difference
You changed three things between dyno runs (and did you do the dyno run on the same day with the same dyno?). How can you attribute your gain to just oil and additive when you installed a new air filter? You can't.
 
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