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Discussion Starter #1
Here is a shot in the dark, but I am sure some of you use your battery tenders outside to keep power during the season while your bike is parked.

I am planning on installing an exterior electrical outlet box and run an extension cord to power the battery tender. This is a two fold method and need some experience/input from this community.

First part: Run an additional electrical line from an existing outlet in my basement, drill through the masonry (brick) to the exterior, and add a GCFI outlet and cover. Any hints? I plan to use 14-gauge wire and it seems pretty straight forward.

Second Part: I plan to run an extension cord under some landscape/mulch, under my walkway, peel up some grass and bury the run until it gets to the sidewalk. I live in a townhouse community, so we have assigned parking spaces in front of the house with a common sidewalk in between. I was going to run the extension cord in an expansion joint and cover it with that gray concrete crack sealer (expandable) and then have it pop out where my bike usually is parked (25-50' run).

I was going to run the extension cord to a small plastic (beefy Tupperware) container, connect the extension cord and tender box, and have the tender wire extend from the box to the bike (3-4 ft).

Think it will work? Any thing I am missing?

Thanks, Roadkill
 

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the whole extension chord thing isn't gonna be up to code, and may get you into some trouble. your bike is ok for short periods of time (weeks) without the tender. if you think you won't be riding longer than that, why not just pull the battery? it only takes 5 min to hook up...

here's a battery removal tip. take a piece of flat webbing or strap (cloth climbing webbing, backpack strap, etc) and loop it around the battery vertically and around the bottom to form a battery handle. give the whole battery a wrap or 2 of duct tape or gaffer's tape. viola. instant battery removal handle.

now, either epoxy or safety wire the battery nuts to the terminals so they don't get lost in transit. now, all you have to do is hook up the positive and negative with a socket/screw driver and yer off n running. Removal is just as easy, pull 2 screws and replace the seat.
 

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Sounds like you should be alright. One thing to consider is if the landscapers that take care of the property may do an annual Aeration of the turf. If they do you will need to make sure you bury the wire at least 8" deep. They will pull your wire up like spaghetti. Plus if you have a winter freeze/thaw cycle the wire will raise to the surface over time. It might take years but the deeper the better.

I do think it is overkill and more work than it is worth. But if you want to do it, go ahead.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I appreciate the input everyone. The reason I have put so much thought into this is because late last season, the battery died. Ok it was the original from 2000, so no big deal. So I bought a new one to the tune of $75. It got cold, and then that one died as well. It got so bad that I couldnt even start it using the battery from my SUV while it was off. I had to jump it with the SUV engine running!!! Well, it has been on the tender in my basement for months and hopefully that is enough to bring it back to life.

So, I guess, a little cabin fever, the reluctancy to buy another $75 battery, the fear of being stranded somewhere with a dead battery, and some ingenuity is getting the best of my brain this winter.

Keep the input coming, I pay about $130/year for our homeowners maintenance fees and with that, we have to cut our own lawn, an aerator is not even in the picture.

Oh, and the extra work is not a problem either. I am one of those guys that always has to be doing something around the house. Just add this one to the list.

Thanks for the tips Slakware, I may try the removal handle.

Thanks
 

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Or perhaps turn the bike on every weekend
a motor at idle isn't producing enough juice to actually charge the battery. you need to actually apply some revs for a significant period of time to do that.
I start the SV and my sons bikes every couple of weeks and let them warm up to normal op temp. Moderate rpm (2.5K~3K) for a minute before shutting down seems to keep the batteries topped off. I've never put a charger on the SV since I bought it (Nov '06).
 

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I am planning on installing an exterior electrical outlet box and run an extension cord to power the battery tender. This is a two fold method and need some experience/input from this community.

[snip]

. I live in a townhouse community

I would check your condo/building/community/association rules first

most places don't allow that type of alteration
 
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