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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's good yall?

Every once in awhile we see a new owner experiencing issues getting used to the engine braking on the SV, as it is much stronger then on some other bikes.

After swapping from the stock N bars to the SVRP clip ons, my idle dropped to about 1K, previously it was set around 1300.

I had also previously adjusted TPS to 1350 or so.

I rode the bike a couple times with the idle set at 1k and I noticed a high amount of engine braking upon downshifting.

Raised my idle back up to 1300 and guess what? Engine braking is much more controllable and feels as it should.

So TLDR, if your having trouble getting used to the engine braking on the SV, check your idle setting and your TPS adjustment, because when you get everything set properly, the engine braking becomes smooth and predictable, much less throttle needed on downshifts to rev match.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What’s changing to clipons have to do with idle?
Normally nothing, I assume there was more tension on the cable with the pro taper bars setup, which inadvertently raised the idle speed by 300 RPM or so. (It didn't fluctuate with bar input, but idle speed was higher)

I was just sharing in case someone else runs into the engine braking issue they know a decent place to start looking. :)
 

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Engine braking is a function of gear choice and throttle position during deceleration. I’ve owned 20 different motorcycles from 350 to 1000cc, vertical twins, v-twins, opposed twins and in-line fours. There is nothing peculiar or strong about SV650 engine braking. Peculiar or strong engine braking is a rider-induced condition, not a motorcycle feature.
 

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2000 SV650 N
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I find the SV's strong engine braking to be a feature rather than a liability. Once you get used to it, it adds to the joys of the bike.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but the strength of the engine braking has to do with bore size vs. number of cylinders, correct? That is, holding all else equal, a 650cc two-cylinder engine will have stronger braking than a 650cc four-cylinder engine. If I'm dumbass wrong, please let me know.
 

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'07 SV650S, '05 Ninja 250
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Yeah, that's getting at it anyway. I see what jksh25 is saying that "engine braking is a rider-induced condition" in that the rider controls the amount of engine braking regardless of how strong it is, but some bikes have more than others.
New bikes, Ducati for example, actually allow you to program how much engine braking is allowed to interfere. Silly in my mind, but that definitely falls under a "feature".
 

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2019 Suzuki SV650X 2000 Kawasaki ZX12R
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Since getting my ecu flashed I have very little engine braking and love it. Flashing is an option of you want to lessen it significantly.... not a cheap option though.
 

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I’ll try not to go all Kevin Cameron on you guys (like I could, not). It has to do with the mass of reciprocating parts, whether they are tightly grouped to a crankshaft with small counterweights, or further from the crank and larger in mass with attendant crankshaft counterweights being necessarily larger. In-line fours have more, smaller pistons, sometimes on shorter rods or with shorter crankshaft throws. The twins have a big lump on a rod with a big weight on the opposite side of the crank. Centrifugal force and mass further from the rotating axis means relatively more torque in a big (the 650 isn’t) twin compared to inline four. Those big weights often limit RPM compared to a four. And during deceleration the torque sort of works in reverse by limiting spin down speed of the engine, producing the relatively larger engine braking.

Note the word relative. A 650 isn’t a 1200 and the engine braking difference in a middle weight just isn’t that different than a four. Now my Buell had a more dramatic effect.

The SV650 abides by most of the characteristics of a typical 90 degree v-twin. But the thing I enjoy the most is the way it revs a lot more like a four than a Harley/Buell. The SV is a very interesting animal. One of my favorite.
 

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I'm a new rider, brand-new to the SV650, coming from an '82 Suzuki GS650G. That was my first bike, I rode it for about 4 months after learning last fall. My highly sophisticated and meticulously-calibrated butt dyno tells me that the force of the engine braking is stronger on the SV than on the GS - that said, I don't know how much of that effect is a function of the SV being significantly lighter, in addition to the different dynamics of the V-twin vs. the I4. (The SV is also much more powerful than the 649cc engine my old GS had, so...?)

As it happens, I also test rode a LiveWire One a couple of weeks ago (it was a demo day in Bristol CT, and I got some LOOKS from the Harley Bros when I saddled up on the electric bike). The SV's engine braking isn't QUITE as prominent as the LiveWire when the electric motor is on regen, but it's...reminiscent. (For what it's worth, I LOVED the LiveWire, and something like it will eventually replace my SV.) I'm going to ride an Energica on Tuesday, as well. I didn't have my SV when I rode the LiveWire but I do now, so I'll be able to give a more informed comparison.
 

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I'm a new rider, brand-new to the SV650, coming from an '82 Suzuki GS650G. That was my first bike, I rode it for about 4 months after learning last fall. My highly sophisticated and meticulously-calibrated butt dyno tells me that the force of the engine braking is stronger on the SV than on the GS - that said, I don't know how much of that effect is a function of the SV being significantly lighter, in addition to the different dynamics of the V-twin vs. the I4. (The SV is also much more powerful than the 649cc engine my old GS had, so...?)
Despite what the technical opinion might be I agree with you that the SV does have a healthy measure of engine braking going on. I've witnessed first hand guys at the track trying to race the SV hard out without a slipper clutch installed and they can be all out of shape coming into corners while they're changing down the gears.
 
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