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I am pretty confident that there is a fluid dynamics (heat, use, etc) point to the res on the front... otherwise the boys in the labcoats would have made it different.
As I was saying- the reservoir is there to serve a few purposes- one to (obviously) be a reservoir, backup fluid.

As your rotors and pads wear down, that space is filled by a tiny bit of brake fluid.

The second reason for the reservoir is to serve as some backup- for instance if you were to have some brake failure, like a brake pad slipping off it's clip (causing the pistons to now travel MUCH farther)- the master cylinder would then "suck" more fluid from the reservoir in order to compensate for that extra travel (similar to the previous mentioned reasoning)

For the tube reservoir concept this would likely mean brake failure- HOWEVER, considering the design of the SV's brake pads this is very unlikely to happen, and even if it did it is unlikely that you would have effective brakes anyway.

The third (and this isn't exactly the reservoir's doing, but more of a handicap of the reservoir system) is to separate the brake fluid from any "moisture"- (this was brought up while back in this thread)- brake fluid naturally absorbs water, and in doing so this lower's it's boiling temperature.... Boiling brake fluid is bad (normally 300-500 degrees AFAIK, but with added water/moisture significantly lower), so we want to keep the humidity away from it. That's why you have the little diaphragm in the res. Air on top- fluid on bottom.

I'd say the most important reason to have a res is for the sake of maintaining and "bleeding" the brakes- if you bleed them often it is helpful to have a good serving of fluid at the top, as many of you know, if you suck air in the top while bleeding- you are starting all over again (unless you are 2 cool for old school bleeding and use a syringe :) like a pro).

My plan for bleeding with just a little tube reservoir is to just attach a little cup or "temporary reservoir" with some brake fluid in it. When i get all the air out of the system ill pull the cup off and cap the tube.- Capping the tube will keep the fluid in and moisture out.

A main benefit of this short "tube" reservoir is simplicity, it will do the same job as the normal res, but with a easier to check, easier to maintain, less expensive to replace and nicer looking finish (perhaps a little "street-fightery" though).

One thing to consider is that over time as your brakes wear the "tube reservoir" is going to get a "negative pressure" - the master cylinder will always suck a "little" bit of fluid (again compensating for the wearing of brake pads/rotors) - as the MC sucks fluid it will need some sort of breather to keep that pressure normalized.

Ever hold your thumb over the end of a straw with water in it? Same concept.... My theory is that if you just pull the cap off of the res every once and a while it will normalize and be just fine.... as it is It likely wouldn't matter because the "suck" from the MC is going too be far more powerful than a 1/4" of air.

Sleep time :)
 
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