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If the comment comes from some ignorant assh*le offering an uninformed opinion, I point out that at 66, I have already lived more life than they can ever imagine and have no intention of "going gentle into that good night," but that even old and cranky as I am, there are still strong bonds which tie me to my life. And that I intend to continue riding because it would be dull to pause and rust unburnished.

why even answer them? let the cliche-spewing crowd keep reeee-ing away
 

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Get good training. Wear good gear. You will always find people who will tell you horror stories. You can die stepping out of the shower. You can die choking on your food. You can live hiding under your bed, but why would you live like that? If you want to make a point, make up some horrific car crash story. Really gruesome. That's what I do.:icon_biggrin:

Mad
 

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I wouldnt listen to it.....i heard that many times from other ppl when i was your age....its your life and you love riding bikes and you are the one who made that decision....to me is important to be present, aware that you are riding, your surroundings..wear decent gear, helmet , respect your machine because you are the one whose riding it and it listen to your orders....
 

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It usually comes from a good place. I prefer to be politely dismissive about it -- yeah it's dangerous, definitely not for everyone -- nod, smile, and get the hell on with our lives.

You're not going to suddenly convince anyone who's been regurgitating whatever it was that got in their head N years ago about motorcycling anyhow.
 

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those are the people you need to look out for the most when you are riding... the ones that want to potentially hurt you for riding a motorcycle!

sure bikes are dangerous
take precautions
be smart about it
and hopefully you will have some fun!
 

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Hello everyone. I am a new rider, 17, and still in high school. Whenever I tell people I ride or they see me on my bike, the first words are usually “omg you are going to die” or “have fun dying on your death machine”. Sorry if this is a morbid topic, but I have heard these statements countless times and was wondering if anyone else has people saying these bold things. If you have, how did you handle the conversation? Sorry if this is in the wrong forum section I am new.


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You've had some great replies.


If you choose to Ride a Motorcycle arm yourself with as much help/Practice as you can and don't,"Throttle and Brake".Smooth is the way and Anticipation is better than Reaction.

Once or twice a month I still practice,"Threshold Braking/Emergency stops" on either a large empty car-park or a Straight Traffic and side road/Vehicle free road.
Check out this video,



:vroom:
 

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It's a good question, having died once I'm not looking forward to doing it again anytime soon.

You need to think about the risks and what you can do to mitigate them.

As many have said wearing good gear is a start - and wear it all the time.
I'm the poster child for what good gear can do for you, and I never ride without it.

Realize that nearly everything you'll do on a motorcycle is counter-intuitive and your native reactions are likely to get you into trouble. You need to practice the correct techniques and build muscle memory (habits). Practice doesn't make perfect, it makes permanent, so practice correct techniques often to build good habits.

Realize that nearly everyone on the road is trying to kill you and they are not looking for a 60mph bicycle, they will filter it out. You need to learn to anticipate what drivers could do in order to plan ahead for your own safety. Become a constant "what if" generator, head on a swivel. Maintain a safety bubble around you as much as possible at all times.

Realize that motorcyclists hit a lot of stuff. In the US we're 50% of all guard rail deaths, in 96% of the time in fatal MC vs MV accidents the MC is the striking vehicle, in non-fatal accidents the MC is the striking vehicle (the one that hits another) +90% in front end collisions and +80% of the time in rear-end collisions. +70% of the time accidents occurring in intersections happen within our peripheral vision which means we're a spectator to our own accidents.

Don't ride impaired. Drugs, Alcohol, cold meds, ill, fatigued, etc. will all add to your risk.

Don't ride with idiots. Ride your own ride, to your level - don't let others get you hurt, it's simply not worth it.

Practice braking at the speeds you travel. If you are only practicing braking at 10mph in a parking lot but travel at +70mph on the highway the first time you need to slow to a stop from 70mph things may not go well as you revert to what you know - which is likely not stopping from 70mph.

Take all of the training you can, read as much as you can - knowledge can decrease your risks, help you prepare.

It's nice that people care enough to worry, or they are opinionated enough to want to give you a hard time, but become an educated rider, learn how to manage and mitigate risks, become a better rider and have a great time doing it - no better way to see the world most days...
 

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Discussion Starter #30
It's a good question, having died once I'm not looking forward to doing it again anytime soon.

You need to think about the risks and what you can do to mitigate them.

As many have said wearing good gear is a start - and wear it all the time.
I'm the poster child for what good gear can do for you, and I never ride without it.

Realize that nearly everything you'll do on a motorcycle is counter-intuitive and your native reactions are likely to get you into trouble. You need to practice the correct techniques and build muscle memory (habits). Practice doesn't make perfect, it makes permanent, so practice correct techniques often to build good habits.

Realize that nearly everyone on the road is trying to kill you and they are not looking for a 60mph bicycle, they will filter it out. You need to learn to anticipate what drivers could do in order to plan ahead for your own safety. Become a constant "what if" generator, head on a swivel. Maintain a safety bubble around you as much as possible at all times.

Realize that motorcyclists hit a lot of stuff. In the US we're 50% of all guard rail deaths, in 96% of the time in fatal MC vs MV accidents the MC is the striking vehicle, in non-fatal accidents the MC is the striking vehicle (the one that hits another) +90% in front end collisions and +80% of the time in rear-end collisions. +70% of the time accidents occurring in intersections happen within our peripheral vision which means we're a spectator to our own accidents.

Don't ride impaired. Drugs, Alcohol, cold meds, ill, fatigued, etc. will all add to your risk.

Don't ride with idiots. Ride your own ride, to your level - don't let others get you hurt, it's simply not worth it.

Practice braking at the speeds you travel. If you are only practicing braking at 10mph in a parking lot but travel at +70mph on the highway the first time you need to slow to a stop from 70mph things may not go well as you revert to what you know - which is likely not stopping from 70mph.

Take all of the training you can, read as much as you can - knowledge can decrease your risks, help you prepare.

It's nice that people care enough to worry, or they are opinionated enough to want to give you a hard time, but become an educated rider, learn how to manage and mitigate risks, become a better rider and have a great time doing it - no better way to see the world most days...


Braking is one of the most important skills it seems like from many people. Keeping a head on the swivel is also important I have noticed. After crashing at a slow 20mph, I will always wear gear, if I wasn’t I would have road rash everywhere. All skills are important and I look forward to practicing and maintaining them.


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aim high in steering this centers you in the lane
get the big picture stay back and see it all
keep your eyes moving scan don't stare
leave yourself an out [be prepared and expect the unexpected
make sure they see you [eye contact]



these {UPS HABITS] methods have saved me plenty of times on a bike or in a cage
 
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