Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll take the risk of sounding like a complete idiot.

Trying to connect a battery tender to my battery. Figured it's a simple procedure, but the manual, written to account for all uses (bike, car, other) talks about connecting one cable to the battery, the other to the frame (to ground). It talks about having the battery in a well ventilated place. And it doesn't say whether there is an order to which side (positive or negative) should be connected to first.

So I'm confused and apprehensive.

Any help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
No such thing as a stupid question. I put one on my bike and read that too. I have the Tender Jr. I don't believe these bikes(2nd gen is what I have) are grounded to the frame. I followed the neg wire and it doesn't go to the frame. I hooked them up with red on pos(+) and black on neg(-). I then ran the lead out of the subframe through a little hole where the rear end plastics are riveted to the black undertail. I then zip tied it to the subframe, shifter side. Just hook it up then once it is done plug it in, the light will tell you the state of charge. If this confuses you tell me and I'll take some pics. Good luck.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,820 Posts
Sealed batteries do not mean hydrogen cannot escape ... that is not correct.
I have seen explosions occur with sealed batteries charging! One with an idiot that had a cigarette in his mouth leaning over the charging battery. He was very lucky!

Sealed batteries mean that once the acid is added, the battery is sealed to prevent further addition of water or acid.
The battery can go on its side temporarily without leaking the contents. (some will argue this point but I am not going there!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I took the battery out and have it in my room. Is that a bad idea? Are gases as big of an issue as the leaflet suggests?

Should I instead put the battery back in and charge it in the garage? I've never seen the temperature in the garage go below 45F, so I doubt the battery would have a chance to freeze and crack, which was the reason for removing it (first winter with a bike, and first winter in this garage).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,820 Posts
Put the battery back in the garage and don't lay it on concrete.
Lay it on a piece of wood that will act as an insulator.
Not quite sure why but I think it has something to do with the
alkalinity of concrete and the acidity in the battery and it does
something to the charge.

Having a battery in the house is not extremely dangerous if it is
in an area that is well ventilated. Todays energy efficient houses
however restrict ventilation and that is where the problems start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
The idea behind connecting to the frame (actually any ground other than the negative pole of the battery) is to lessen the chance of hydrogen explosion. Get the connection spark away from the battery where there could be hydrogen. The frame should be a good ground. You can tell if the charger shows some draw when you connect. So hook up the positive first, then the negative to what you think is a good ground, turn the charger on and observe.

Most tenders come with a harness that can be permanently attached to the battery making hookup a plug in operation. More convenient if you run the wire to a spot you can access. That's what I always do.

By the way, there is no problem setting a battery on concrete. Another myth.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
andyauger said:
By the way, there is no problem setting a battery on concrete.  Another myth.
myth based on experiences  people have  when they left a battery to set on the garage floor for 2 years with a few 30 below zero weeks of weather,  battery would have likely gone dead where ever it was left,  temperatures are colder  next to the floor

myth or no, I put a block of wood under a battery or even a concrete block,  not to get it off the concrete, but to get it off the floor. If I lived in warmer climates, I wouldn't have the same concern
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
Colder temperatures result in the battery discharging at a slower rate, so a battery sitting at floor level would go dead slower than it would if it were stored somewhere warmer. While it's true that a battery at a colder temp has less capacity than one at room temp does, the discharge rate is what's important during a storage situation. Taking a battery out and storing it somewhere warmer does nothing......except accelerate the discharge rate. If there's something causing the battery to discharge while in the vehicle during storage, (something in the electrical system drawing voltage), then disconnecting the battery or removing it completely would be beneficial. But......the temperature isn't the culprit, whatever is drawing the power from the battery is.

The only reason to store a battery somewhere warmer, would be to prevent it from freezing if it is allowed to go dead. Freezing is not a concern unless the battery goes dead. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
The SV's battery is sealed but I do not believe is is and AGM(absorbed glass mat) battery. AGM batteries are totally sealed and could be mounted in any position theoretially and are sealed to the point that hydrogen cannot escape. The batteries that they are refering to concerning hydrogen are ones with refill caps. Bring the battery in the house if it is convienient and take it to the garage to charge it one day a month then bring it back inside. Hydrogen gas is a potential problem but only while charging. Batteries do not like being cold, freezing, or not ever seeing any current being used or charged.

Zak
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
It is my understanding that both extreme heat and cold temperatures take  there toll over time on batteries. However during the cold weather when the engine oil is viscous, is when most batteries give up the fight.
Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,749 Posts
All I know is that my old man worked on cars and then was an HVAC repairman for 25 years and he knows EVERYTHING about batteries/electricity and he told me do not store it in the house and be sure its off concrete because of the chemicals in concrete can have a reaction with the battery. Concrete can have a high alkalinity because of the chemical reaction when it cures. Also I have seen batteries that sat on concrete slip open now whether or not the concrete caused it I do not know but that would be my guess. So keep it in the shed or garage off of concrete and if its cold out it shouldnt effect the battery. Cold is better than warm in this case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
so the concensus here is that colder temps are more harmful to the battery than warmer temps?
That may be the concensus, but it's not true. Colder temperatures can cause a discharged battery to freeze, but colder temperatures slow the rate that batteries discharge on their own. Long story short.....don't store a dead battery in an environment that is cold enough to allow it to freeze. Actually, there's no good reason to store a dead battery anywhere.

Everybody gets mixed up by the way cold temperatures reduce the capacity of batteries. You may very well lose half of your cranking capacity at 0 degrees, but that doesn't automatically mean that colder temps are "bad" for batteries. The opposite is true.....hot ambient temps reduce the longevity of batteries dramatically. Go to any of the battery manufacturers' sites and hit the "contact us" icon. Shoot 'em an e-mail and ask. While you're at it, ask about the concrete floor myth as well. ;)
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top