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Sure it's not the drag of your stock rear fender? ;)
Every now and then I feel the crown of the road pulling me, but it's a small drift. Thanks to PennDOT, There are too many potholes and uneven road surfaces to go more than a few feet on smooth pavement.
 

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Re: It's the crown

andyauger said:
The crown in the road will make your bike feel like it's not vertical.  It's also what makes the left side of the tread wear faster.  The "left turns are longer" theory doesn't hold water.  Think of how much time you spend turning vs. how much time you spend running straight.  Also think about the higher loads on the tread when making shorter (right hand) turns.  Sort of evens out.

Don't trust the hash marks when aligning the rear tire.  Measure from the swingarm pivot to the rear axle.  This is more reliable.  On bikes with torque arms connected to the rear caliper, loosen the torque arm before aligning.
Andy, crown of road is not sufficient angle to make wear noticably to the left. I used to think the same thing, but roads would have to be crowned at 20% (2 feet higher at center than edges) to account for the wear pattern
http://www.rattlebars.com/valkfaq/tirewear/
 

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Mr. Black said:
Luckily we do not really have crowned roads here.

My bike has never felt like it was leaning.  EVAR. ;D
roads are crowned everywhere to some degree for drainage, it doesn't take long for improperly crowned roads to become potholed
 

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Good find RandyO

OTHER THEORIES DISPROVED:
But what about road crown? One of the major contenders for the explanation of left side tire wear is the road crown. It seems logical since it's the only one which allows for the fact that in Euro left side driving countries, the crown is opposite which explains right side wear in those countries. Well, what sounds true at first blush, really isn't. For one reason, road crowns are not steep enough. If you check a picture of the front tire upright, you can see that even a very steep road crown (one inch drop in one foot run) would not contact the tire at the necessary angle to produce the wear that is evident. Typical road crowns are much much less (three inches drop per twelve foot run which is measured in minutes, not degrees). In fact, if one examines a picture of the tire one can see that where a road crown would actually contact the tire, there is a PEAK rather than a valley from wear (check our extreme wear pic at the top of this page). Plus, as described in the paragraphs above, road crown contact would be "rolling" contact which produces very little wear if any at all (unless low tire pressure comes into play). It takes quite a bit of force to scuff stuff off of a tire. So there is no misunderstanding, road crown plays no part whatsoever in left side tire wear. Road crowns, if they exist at all on a road, are completely inconsistent and vary greatly as to pitch, vary even more greatly in turns (road engineers do indeed "bank" turns), and in no way even contact a tire where the wear occurs (20° off horizontal) when the bike is upright on the road.
 

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I've noticed the same thing lately too. I've narrowed it down to either the amount of pressure being applied to the left grip, or not sitting correctly on the seat. Try putting a tiny extra pressure on the right grip and see if it levels it out for you. It has seemed to help me, but that doesn't mean much.
 

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Road crown is only set a a certain % when the road is engineered. Many back roads are crowned to what just "looks good" to the paving crew. Major highways and such are crowned according to how much average rain falls in that area. This could mean shallow or steep crowns, accordingly. As far as a general wear slightly to the left of center, this is what causes it. If it's further left than that, it's something else. It has nothing to do with more left turns than right, or more time spent making a left turn than a right. I can't recall who said that. It makes no sense. I remember having this same discussion in SEVERAL civil engineering classes. I also remember it being documented in my transportation engineering book. Don't try to "educate" someone on a topic you know nothing about. This is why I'm not a doctor.
 

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ASCSurveyor said:
Road crown is only set a a certain % when the road is engineered.  Many back roads are crowned to what just "looks good" to the paving crew.  Major highways and such are crowned according to how much average rain falls in that area.  This could mean shallow or steep crowns, accordingly.  As far as a general wear slightly to the left of center, this is what causes it.  If it's further left than that, it's something else.  It has nothing to do with more left turns than right, or more time spent making a left turn than a right.   I can't recall who said that.  It makes no sense.  I remember having this same discussion in SEVERAL civil engineering classes.  I also remember it being documented in my transportation engineering book.  Don't try to "educate" someone on a topic you know nothing about.  This is why I'm not a doctor.
ASC, even the steepest crowns are only 5% If you have ever seen this wear,, it is further off center than that, we drive on right hand side of road, left hand turns are always on out side of the centerline radius, a longer distance than rightand turns olways on the inside of the centerline radius or shorter, on average you spend more time leaning to the left so left hand side of tire wears slightly faster . I always hit wear bars on left side of tire before the right side, the wear bars are waaaay beond anything that the crown of road would have effect on.
 

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My front fairing mount is completely bent so the whole front plastics of my bike point to a different direction than the bike actually goes. It freaked me out the first time I rode it after my big wreck, but now I am just used to it. Just like I am used to my bent handle bar. The beast lives on!

-josh
 

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If you're concerned the lean is due to motorcycle itself, ride through a parking lot and try to notice if you lean. That should rule out the crowned road surface since lots are usual level.
 

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No, but something else does...
 
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