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I have a 03 sv650s and I want to upgrad the forks. I'm thinking of getting the .85 springs w/ 20w oil (i'm 150 with gear and only ride street... more on the agressive side). The bike has 22K miles and never has had any fork maintenance/work...do you think I should replace the bushings and seals while I have everything apart or would I get several thousand more miles out of them?

Who makes better springs? Sonicsprings or racetec?

Thanks
 

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I would replace the seals for sure. Bushings - not particularly. Unless wheelies affect them and you do a lot of wheelies. (Not sure about that.)

The springs from Sonic Springs, Racetech etc. are similar. In general, you'll get a recommendation for Sonic Springs here on this board.

This is because
1. The owner, Rich Desmond, is an active board member here. We like to support such people.
2. Their estimate of spring rates that you need are generally more accurate.
 
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No offense to Maritan, but IMO, I don't see any reason to replace the seals unless they are leaking. Let 'em be- if they fail at some point in the future, it's not that big of a deal to replace them then.

Same deal with fork bushings. Replacing them is a fairly major job, and there's no reason to unless they're damaged. With the front wheel elevated, grab the bottom of the sliders and give 'em a shake. If the bushings are worn you'll feel a 'clunk' as you move them (loose steering head bearings will give you a 'clunk' too, but you shouldn't have any trouble telling the difference).

+1 for Sonic Springs. Nothing wrong with RaceTech, but I feel like Sonic is more familiar with the SV's particular hardware.

:)
 

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22k mi.? it's at least time to replace the bushings. don't forget to pickup both the inner and outers. they wear out over time and it's time to replace em. so long as you have your seal driver, it's not hard to replace the bushings. just pop the leg off, use a flathead to get the bushings out and slip in a new set.

fork oil should be replaced annually esp. if you ride it hard.
 
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mstingray said:
"22k mi.?  it's at least time to replace the bushings."
I can't say that I agree with you on that. There are many healthy bikes out there with a lot more than 22K on their fork bushings -I've two in my garage right now, at 55K and 39K. Just my opinion...

:)
 

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nc_sv650 said:
I can't say that I agree with you on that. There are many healthy bikes out there with a lot more than 22K on their fork bushings -I've two in my garage right now, at 55K and 39K. Just my opinion...

:)
55K, I'll bet those bushings are pretty worn. my original fork was rebuilt at 65k, seals weren't blown, but they were replaced anyway, bushings, that's another story, they were worn, really worn
 

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+1 what randy said.

if you don't know what to look for, then they may look fine on the outside but going that long w/o a replacing them is not a good thing. 50-60k, and you definitely need to have changed them out and some point. if you ride hard in the twisties then it was long overdue in a 1/3 of the mileage.

i'd bet good money if i took either the forks of those bikes in your garage apart, they'd have severely worn bushings. the bike engine maybe running fine but suspension needs to be serviced every once in a while (annually IMO).
 

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I just did the fork, sonic springs, and replaced both seals.I am glad I did when I opened the dust seals the old seals were rusted and simply looked as though they were ready to burst open.I have 14k miles.
You don't have to take the dumper rod out.There is an easier way.I did run a thread about this but I will give you the link.It was really easy.You don't need a special tool or even a PVC pipe to drive the seals,just put the old seal on top of the new one after removing the metal ring and just tab all around.The groove for pin is your guide and you can check your level by having all sides just under this groove.Lot of people tend to dramatize this procedure but it is really easy. You can pop the old seal by filling the forks all the way with oil and putting the fork under a jack.The oil has nowhere to go and pops the seal out.You can stop the jack pressure as soon as it moves so you don't make a mess.
You don't need to replace the bushings yet. Here is the link.This was the best thing I read on the net yet.http://motorcyclecruiser.com/tech/forkseals/
 
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