Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok...

Like many of you, I'm unwilling to pay the outrageous price that Suzuki wants for the Steering stem nut socket ($169 Cdn), so I decided to try and make my own.

I've seen some people use a grinder on a 1-1/4" deep socket, which was my original intention, however I couldn't find a deep socket for little $.

I then also saw Motophoria here on SVRIDER use some galvanized steel plumbing parts with some steel rod.

I managed to get my hands on a steering stem nut that I could use as a template...

So here's my take on the idea for less than $8US in parts...

I went into the plumbing section of my local hardware store, and grabbed:

- 1-1/4" threaded 4" galvanized steel pipe
- 1-1/4" to 1" galvanized steel reducer
- 1" galvanized steel threaded cap

Using a marker, I marked out the areas that had to be cut out using a locknut as a template. I also used a visual aid to show how much depth I needed to grind away.


I then grabbed some proper eyewear...


I placed the pipe in a vise, and using a grinder I ground away...


I used a file to clean up the edges and properly fit the nut




Once I knew I was as close as I'd get, I screwed the 3 pieces together using some steel epoxy. It's still drying, so I have yet to use it. I'm pretty sure it'll work just fine...



Oh yeah, the top cap can be used with an open end wrench, or a socket (I think 21mm or 22mm)

It's not as pretty as the Suzuki tool, but it will get the job done without mutilating the soft-as-butter aluminum locknut by using a hammer and a screwdriver.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,443 Posts
dang I just did the hammer screw driver thing. Very nice, I'll have to do this one now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
I guess I should have saved my money when I bought the tool. :(

The reason why you used a pipe with a tread on both end was the availability?

1+ on the proper eye wear :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The reason why you used a pipe with a tread on both end was the availability?
Yeah, I couldn't find the pipe without threads on one end while I was out last night, so I grabbed what I could find.

1+ on the proper eye wear :)
lol, I had misplaced my work goggles, so I just threw on my helmet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,729 Posts
Good idea

Might have been better to get the next longer one & just cut the threaded area off completely first though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,729 Posts
Here's another great use for conduit which goes along with another part of the process, when you need to swap out the bearings
Note: you should really never mix & match the races from the donor forks with that in the head of the recipient bike.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I usually grind a flat on to the side of the race with an angle grinder until it has a very thin spot. If you get it thin enough with out grinding into the stem you can then tap the race with a hammer and drift, it will fracture at the thinnest point, loosening up enough to slide it off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
Red-line, did you use the tool yet?

Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I havn't yet finished sourcing all the parts that I need for the GSXR fork swap... I'm just waiting on the brake lines and some other odds and ends.

I'll update here once I have used the tool and let you know how it went.

Thanks,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Looks like a pretty good job, I'll have to check back to see how it works.

I'm also about to do a fork swap on my '03 SV and I also didn't want to buy a $70 socket.

I took my calipers down to Ace Hardware and measured a few sockets and found that a 1 1/4" twelve point deep socket with a 1/2" drive is just about the perfect size. It cost $8.79 US before tax. So there is another option for people who don't want to mess with epoxying pipe fittings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
Does it have to be twelve point or can it also be a 6 point?
I think the 6 point might have more meat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
I actually chose the 12 because it has less 'meat.'

A 1 1/4" 6 point socket is about 32 mm across, the flat parts of the castle nut are about 36 mm apart, so you would have to remove more material that way. The 12 point has more than enough material to work with.

When I'm done cutting the socket down I'll post some pictures, but this way you don't have to grind off as much material
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Ok, so here's what I did:
First I took a dremel to the socket to remove the largest amount of material from between the teeth. I actually used 2 reinforced cutting disks with 2 high speed cutting disks sandwiched between them.

Then I used one of the nuts to mark the socket where the teeth needed to be




Next I used a flat file to remove the rest of the material. I feel like I can be more accurate with the file than with the dremel.


Here I am sizing up the teeth


And here is the finished product
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
EVERYONE,

The DIY tool I made to remove the steering stem castle-nuts was useless. It broke as soon as I applied some torque to it. The threaded pipe that I used is just too soft.

Those of you thinking of making your own tool, use a 1-1/4" deep socket as shown above by Neone, and not the pipe like i did.

I ended up using a large robertson screwdriver and a hammer, with suprisingly minimal damage to the nut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
EVERYONE,

The DIY tool I made to remove the steering stem castle-nuts was useless. It broke as soon as I applied some torque to it. The threaded pipe that I used is just too soft.

Those of you thinking of making your own tool, use a 1-1/4" deep socket as shown above by Neone, and not the pipe like i did.

I ended up using a large robertson screwdriver and a hammer, with suprisingly minimal damage to the nut.
Red-Line,

I wonder if your tool broke because the pipe threads weakened the "teeth" you cut. There's not much material left where the teeth are.

I'll bet you'd have better results if you cut off the threaded area and cut the teeth into the plain, unthreaded part of the pipe. I agree however, that starting off with an old deep socket would be a better bet.

... Gregg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,443 Posts
thanks for letting us know your results.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top