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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I've just got a 2003 sv650 s with 27000 miles on. Seems like the first owner has taken care of it on his own but last owner... Not so much.
Anyways... With the purchase of bike, I received this "haynes service n repair Manuel" n with whatever free time I have I plan to do maintenance on my own... After I get an oil change before I collect some tools... :)
Can someone pls recommend me some budget friendly tool set that I will need to get the job done?

I'm searching for rear stand on craigs... R there certain types I should look for? To me... I don't think its worth spending over 100 for pitbull stand... Looking at trackside rear stand for 50.

Also is front stand a must have for major stuff? Thank u!
 

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You will find varying opinions about brands of tools but I don't think you will find a budget friendly single set that will cover all your needs. Most shade tree mechanics get Craftsman sets. Budget shoppers go to Harbor Freight. Pros go for Snap-On or other high end brands. I have mostly Craftsman stuff and it is decent. I have a few things (impact sockets and hex bit sockets in larger sizes) that I bought at Harbor Freight that are perfectly adequate for my occasional usage.

You will need ratchet wrenches and metric sockets up to 32mm. Starter sets usually go up to about 18mm, so you will probably have to supplement with a few individual sockets, usually in the larger sizes. A breaker bar can be helpful for some fasteners like the rear axle or the front sprocket nut. A set of open end or combination wrenches is also needed.

You will need hex bit sockets up to 12mm. Most sets don't include 12mm. One extra long hex bit is needed to remove the damper rods if you are working on the forks but you can cross that bridge when you come to it. The size depends on the year of the bike.

You need a torque wrench. The beam type are the cheapest and you can find Craftsman for under $25 (on sale for about $15) that cover the range from 0 to 150 ft lbs. They are not as convenient to use as the ratcheting micrometer/clicker or split beam clicker types, but they are accurate, extremely sturdy, and cheap. There are a few esoteric bits (security torx bits) that are needed for particular jobs, also wait until you need them (if ever).

A vernier caliper is useful for measuring things (like a nut that you don't have a socket that fits).

A rear stand is pretty much essential. Pit Bull is great, but there are many cheaper ones that work just as well. Avoid the Harbor Freight stands. A front stand that lifts at the steering stem is really nice to have. However, do a search here on lifting the front end and you will find several alternate ways to do it. IMHO, don't waste money on a front stand that lifts at the bottom of the forks (they are uneven at the bottom on the SV anyway), get the stem stand or use one of the alternate methods.

Some people buy the special tools needed for riveting and breaking the drive chain. There are cheaper alternatives and you can cross that bridge later as well.
 

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+1 on the craftsman tool, cheap sockets and wrenches will strip bolts much easier then descent quality one. I'm not sure what you consider "budget" but you can find some great mechanics tool sets on sale at sears for under $200 on a regular basis.

Like David mentioned you will have to supplement most tool sets with a few other tools, but a nice mechanics set it is a good start.

Something like this would be a good start and even comes in a tool box.

 

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I have some eye screws in the ceiling of my basement shop and in the garage. I use tie down straps (either ratchet or cam type) to hold the bike off the ground. (I use loops of rope on the bike for hook points)

Without a garage, I think a rear stand might be handy, but then where do you keep it? :oops:
 

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+1 on the craftsman tool, cheap sockets and wrenches will strip bolts much easier then descent quality one. I'm not sure what you consider "budget" but you can find some great mechanics tool sets on sale at sears for under $200 on a regular basis.

Like David mentioned you will have to supplement most tool sets with a few other tools, but a nice mechanics set it is a good start.

Something like this would be a good start and even comes in a tool box.

Geez.. I want that, also don't forget a set of hex head wrenches.
 

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+1 to David's post, he hit all the tools I could think of needing. Harbor Freight stuff is decent for the shade tree mechanic. You can find 20% off coupons in most moto mags along with a bunch of other moto related stuff coupons. I have not seen their stand in person, but I might give it a shot if I was in the market for a budget stand.

You'll need some swingarm spools/bobbins to lift the bike. I think the SV uses 8mm screws. They can be had on eBay for cheap.
 

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The problem I have with something like this is that over half of it is stuff you will probably never use on a motorcycle (SAE stuff, screwdriver bits, star bits, etc.) and there is a lot of redundancy in the socket sizes (much overlap in the 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 inch drive sockets...not always a bad thing). You end up either lugging around twice as much stuff as you need and having to keep them all separate, or putting half of the set away in a cabinet somewhere in case SAE fasteners come back into vogue in the future. OTOH, sometimes an SAE/metric set is about as cheap as just buying only the metrics you need...you have to decide if you really need the other stuff and shop wisely to see if it is really a bargain.

I'd rather buy something like this for $50 more:

dam, can't get the link to work...it is this at Sears: Craftsman 201 pc. All Metric Mechanics Tool Set
 

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I use the tool kit that came with the bike more than I do my craftsman set. A socket for the rear axle nut is a good addition, some Metric Allen wrenches, a spark plug socket, a chain breaker, front and rear stands, and a torque wrench. I just picked up the front and rear stands last year, and it was the best thing I could have ever bought, I don't know why I didn't 10 years ago. the craftsmen set is awesome, but like others said you don't need all of the tools just for a bike. It depends on how far your gonna get into working on it, but a couple box end wrenches, 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 socket wrenches, some extensions, certain size sockets are all you really need to do normal maintenance, in my opinion.
 

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BTW, I haven't seen a Haynes manual for the SV, (they're decent for cars I've had) but if you'd like a download of the Suzuki SV Service Manual, I can help you out.
 

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Lowes has the brand "cobalt" less expensive than craftsman but a lot better than harbor freight and it comes with a lifetime no questions, no hassle guarantee should the tool fail.


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle - I can't believe my iPhone can use a Motorcycle
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you for the info, everyone. I didn't think i had any tools for the motorcycle but i've found something today in the rear seat trunk. Yeah~

I thought maybe there is like tool set for a motorcycle though.. lol.. :)

Well, today i got a mini-tune up... getting bike checked out oil/filter changed n etc...

I thought about it n i think it would be wise for me to gather tools as i go instead of getting a set. I think it would probably be easier on my pocket since like some of u said... i probably won't need all the pcs anyway... Well, i gotta go and check out some of new vocabs on this thread now... Lol... again thank you!
 

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The problem I have with something like this is that over half of it is stuff you will probably never use on a motorcycle (SAE stuff, screwdriver bits, star bits, etc.) and there is a lot of redundancy in the socket sizes (much overlap in the 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 inch drive sockets...not always a bad thing). You end up either lugging around twice as much stuff as you need and having to keep them all separate, or putting half of the set away in a cabinet somewhere in case SAE fasteners come back into vogue in the future. OTOH, sometimes an SAE/metric set is about as cheap as just buying only the metrics you need...you have to decide if you really need the other stuff and shop wisely to see if it is really a bargain.

I'd rather buy something like this for $50 more:

dam, can't get the link to work...it is this at Sears: Craftsman 201 pc. All Metric Mechanics Tool Set
I work on allot more then my SV, so the SAE tools come in handy as well (even just around the house). As far as redundancy goes with having multiple sockets of different types, they can come in very handy when needed. I once though I had too many 1/4 socket wrenches until I had to strip my bike down and then it was AMAZING how nice it was not to have to switch sockets for every different size bolt. Having deep sockets comes in very handy as well.

Then again I have a bit of a tool addiction too :naughty:
 

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I thought about it n i think it would be wise for me to gather tools as i go instead of getting a set. I think it would probably be easier on my pocket since like some of u said... i probably won't need all the pcs anyway... Well, i gotta go and check out some of new vocabs on this thread now... Lol... again thank you!
This is your best bet. Get a socket set, and the rest buy as you find yourself wanting to do something that you need a new tool for. Front stand is a good example. If you decide you need to remove the forks, then you get a front stand.
I compare the cost of the tool to the cost of paying someone else to do it. It's often cheaper, plus you end up with some new skill/knowledge, and the tool you need to do it again if need be.
 

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From working on my bike, here's what I would recommend:

- All the even-numbered sizes (6mm, 8mm, etc) up to 18mm for wrenches and 3/8" drive sockets. If possible, get both shallow and deep-well sockets, six-sided rather than 12. Also, spend a little more and get wrenches that have a reversible, angled, ratcheting box-end. You won't regret it.

- 14 through 18 for 1/2" drive, plus whatever is needed for the rear axle. I believe it's 21 or 22mm? Shallow sockets will suffice for most applications, though deep-wells can be useful

- 4,5, and 6mm hex-head sockets in 3/8" Can't remember if 5.5mm is needed. A 10mm will be needed if you plan to ever remove the front axle - though it can be hard to find a socket with 10mm end on it, so you'll have to settle for the allen-wrench style.

- A few 3/8" and 1/2" extensions.

- Set of JIS screwdrivers. These can be a bit of a pain to find, but 'normal' phillips will suffice. Just be careful - JIS screws like to strip when you attempt to remove them using a non-JIS bit.

- Set of flat screwdrivers

- Needle nose and 'standard' pliers.

As for brand, Craftsman is more than fine. Shouldn't run you too much if you find some of the stuff on sale. Also, check craigslist and stuff for tools - the resale value on tools is pretty awful. You could pick up a nice set of Matco, Snap-On, Cornwell, etc, tools for like 15-20% of their new price.
 

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....A 10mm (hex) will be needed if you plan to ever remove the front axle - though it can be hard to find a socket with 10mm end on it, so you'll have to settle for the allen-wrench style.
Unless the '03 is different from other 2nd gen axles, the size is 12mm, not 10mm. These are widely available in sets or alone. AutoZone, Sears, Harbor Freight. You can also make your own by cutting an Allen wrench and putting it into a 12mm socket.
 

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Unless the '03 is different from other 2nd gen axles, the size is 12mm, not 10mm. These are widely available in sets or alone. AutoZone, Sears, Harbor Freight. You can also make your own by cutting an Allen wrench and putting it into a 12mm socket.
mmm was it 12mm? I thought it was 10mm. My bad!
 
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