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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone made the jump to making a homemade cnc mill to manufacture your own SV parts? I'm currently starting to look into materials & costs. But so far I've not found any deterring factors in funding and designing my own backyard cnc mill.

Things to start looking into are:

EEEEEE-BBBBAAAAAYYYYYYY everything.

1 high speed router capable of metal work & high speed router bits intended for metal work. ~ $200-$500

3 identical & reasonably powerful used stepping motors. Not sure what numbers are needed in terms of torque holding power or amperage/voltage in order to accurately mill aircraft aluminum. ~ $60-$150

1 3 axis controller card w/ power supply
software packages (mastercad, solidworks, toolpath programs, UNIX OS (possibility), Corel draw)

3 axis table using:
t-slot extruded aluminum shapes, linear bearings & guide rails, acme threaded rod & bearing blocks, Couplers & anti backlash devices. ~$200-$500

Mill housing enclosure & oil bath recirculation pump/parts ~$200-$300

Fortal aircraft aluminum billet blocks 3" x 5" x 12" = ~$60.00

Doing this on the cheap end. so I'm looking to spend under 1,000. I figure I can get this project up and running in roughly 3-5 months. Should be a lot of fun.

First project will be designing and prototyping a front and rear belt drive pulleys for the SV. Something that would push this forward is an accurate CAD drawing of the 03-08 SV650... Does anyone know if there is such a thing out there on the interwebz? :p

Here are some links for your browsing pleasure:

http://www.dumpstercnc.com/
http://www.cnc4pc.com/Store/osc/index.php?cPath=51
http://tinyurl.com/cuazy3
http://tinyurl.com/cexzuw
 

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Sounds like a neat project. I'd definitely pay $1,000 for my own CNC...
 

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good luck there are going to be alot of bugs to work out but hope it goes well. ever thought about using a drill press insted of a router?
 

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Good luck. You will have to be extremely frugal to get in under the 1K mark - especially if you purchase any software. You will also need breakout boards in addition to the controller. Also plan to spend way more than you budgeted on decent tooling.

The CNC routers I have seen are good for MDF and other woods - maybe light aluminum jobs. The Acme screws will make it difficult to get decent rapids - especially when you are talking table sizes like cnc routers normally use. Not to say that can't work though - I have seen some pretty decent kits put together on the cheap - a dedicated mill would be better. Just keep researching and decide what is good enough for what you want to do. It's fun stuff.
 

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Unless you are making a number of identical parts you are probably better off with a real milling machine, as mentioned above. I used to have machine shop access, and I've made lots of one-offs on lathes, mills and shapers. A couple of cheap dial indicators and a careful hand, with some cut planning, can make great parts with no CNC capacity.
 

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Problem 1... It's gonna cost you more than 1K....
Problem 2... Using stepper motors: If you overload them they will lose position.
Problem 3... No automatic tool changer. Means you use either one tool or you have to change tools manual and re-zero the Z for each new tool as you change.


I had thought about this as well. Your better off buying a used CNC mill,
or this is a better option..
http://grizzly.com/products/CNC-Mill-w-12-Position-ATC/G0618

If you want to find more info on homebuild machines check out cnczone.com
 

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You just stepped into a whole new class with that machine. Steppers are fine - I have never had an issue except for when I run it into the limits (no limit switches). I have never had them lose steps while cutting. You just need to make sure you have the right amount of torque.

I would say you are probably going to be around 2.5K minimum to build a decent machine along with the bare minimum in tooling. That is also assuming you are paying for the software and you have a PC that you can use already. That is not production grade like auto tool changers and the like but if you are just prototyping or making one-offs that is not that big of a deal.
 

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I would be surprised if you could build something for $1000 that you would be satisfied with. I think buying a used CNC machine would be the way to go if you really want programability. I bought a used Hurco about 6 years ago for around $5k if I remember correctly. With the automotive markets so down, I would think there are a lot of used machines to be had.

I'm not a machinist, but I'm fortunate enough to have access to a machine shop. Right now I'm building a new set of triple clamps for a friend. I did the modeling and my buddy did the CNC program.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Instead of a backyard CNC, how about a desktop CNC?

http://www.instructables.com/id/SOEL9J8F5GE3DPE/
eh, same thing. I'm looking more toward something like this: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170310515603#ebayphotohosting

^would that have the ability to do aircraft grade aluminum? I always assumed it would, even if you have slightly weak stepping motors you could always gear down or run tighter lines in the tool path. Time is not really a problem as I could have the program run and finish while i'm at work.

I want the ability to work with all plastics, wood and different grades of aluminum. My goal is to make repeatable designs for rearsets, triple clamps, front and rear belt drive pulleys, headlight brackets, cylinder heads, clutch covers, and parts for a bigger and better cnc machine... etc.. I'd like the table to have a working dimension of 24"x24"x12" (XYZ) The one listed in the ebay auction is close to being perfect. Its just a bit out of my price range and I think I can make it cheaper.

Safety will also be a big concern of mine if I plan on running it while I'm at work. Identifying possible fire hazards and I'll probably put up some sort of polycarbonate/ lexan enclosure so that I dont have a bit break and put an eye out. Some door interlocks & a emergency stop switch are also on the board.


Edit: Sweet! three of these will probably do the job. http://www.kelinginc.net/SMotorstock.html
 
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