Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last friday i was out in the twisties and happily one of my favorite roads was recently paved! one of my favorite corners you come down a hill to a relatively sharp 90 degree right turn that starts back up a hill and goes to a sharp ~110 degree left turn, its a nice little S curve.

anyway, on the transition between the right and left turn when i was upright i got a slight wobble as i was pushing on the left side. Did i do something wrong here? it didnt feel stable. Speed was between 35-50 mph

I'm thinking it was too much handle bar input and not enough body position? I was able to replicate the feeling while on a straight section by alternating pushing on each side of the handlebar rapidly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
It could be a bunch of different things but if the pavement is flat, meaning no issues with it being uneven then its most likely rider inputs making it behave that way. You are probably applying too much on the bars. Most riders including myself always have too much weight on the bars and usually its not a big deal but when transitioning from side to side depending on the amount of tire on the road can cause some issues with stablility. Try just being softer on the controls meaning don't try to strongarm your bars, your arms should be bent, soft touches on the bars itself and you should be able to move your arms like a duck flapping its wings and wiggle your fingers all the time while riding. When you can achieve that amount of a soft touch you can be assured that it isn't your bar inputs causing issues with stability. You will be amazed on how much more confident your bike will be riding through that same area. Some folks would say you should get a steering dampner or you need to ramp it up if you already have one. Thats not that answer. Most issues usually start with just the rider. I'm actually going to my next set of trackdays next month and that's all I have been working on in the street to make sure that my next time at the track when I will be pushing myself a little harder will be more stable and fun time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the reply.

so what is the best way to transition quickly from side to side? more body position? or more input on the footpegs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
They key to a flip-flop is a healthy dose of body english and steering input through handlebar pressure... but that's easier said than done as you need good timing and technique to get it done proficiently.

You want to begin moving your body from one side of the bike to the other, JUST BEFORE you begin turning the bike with the bars.

You want to lead the bike with your body and beat the bike to the other side.

*The wobble could have been caused by any number of things, BUT using your arms to move your body from one side to the other, rather than your legs is often one of the biggest contributing factors. Try and use your legs as much as possible to move your body from one side to the other, rather than your arms. For high speed "flip-flops" I tend to move my lower body first with my legs as it helps me concentrate on using my abdomen to move my upper body, rather than my arms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Make sure your grip on the bars is light, weight either on the tank or holding yourself up thru your core.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
It kinda of depends on the turns. If the turns are tight and your speed is high then you will need to get from one side to the other quickly. This can be done with the whole body but try not to use your hands and the controls to get from one side to the other. It should be more body and legs doing that but do it gingerly. What helped me alot and it might sound corny is to watch on bike video or pro riders and watch different riders going through the same corners. You can see that they all do it differently because their styles and bodies are different but they are all very smooth when tranisitioning. It almost should be like you lift your but off the seat but by only a little bit just to clear the seat and gently move yourself to the other side. You can do this on a stationary bike with a rear stand. If you can practice that over and over without getting the bike to teeter totter on the stand that would be the beginning then trying it while you ride is the proof. Just make sure when you are doing it that you are not relying on your arms and hands to move from side to side.
 

·
site supporter
Joined
·
6,051 Posts
You want to begin moving your body from one side of the bike to the other, JUST BEFORE you begin turning the bike with the bars.

You want to lead the bike with your body and beat the bike to the other side.

"His sh!t, yes, knows this one!"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,835 Posts
If you get really aggressive on a hard side to side, your front tire can and will leave the road for an instant and this 'hop' can cause a momentary wiggle sometimes when it touches down slightly out of line. This is not really a problem, just something to keep in the back of the mind and one of the neat things about precessing a gyro and unloading a compressed set of springs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
If you get really aggressive on a hard side to side, your front tire can and will leave the road for an instant and this 'hop' can cause a momentary wiggle sometimes when it touches down slightly out of line. This is not really a problem, just something to keep in the back of the mind and one of the neat things about precessing a gyro and unloading a compressed set of springs.
Yeah, you gotta really frikkin THROW the bike from one side to the other to make this happen.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,340 Posts
Anybody mention the throttle? If I'm all hamie with it cornering a little wobble comes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
Manhandle, throw, same thing. Pick your poison, my point remains, you need to change direction very aggressively for that to occur... far more aggressively than most riders would be comfortable with and it's highly unlikely that this was the cause of his wobble.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top