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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, I just got my 02 silver SVS back from its 500 mile service and I had requested that the mechanics try to bring in the Clutch lever a little so my fingers don't have to reach soo far to apply the clutch.......the front brake is fine but I would feel a bit more comfortable if the clutch was a tad closer.......any hoo....they advised me when I picked it up that the type of cable/clutch assembly is not able to be adjusted :cry: ......anyone with sugestions.....I would really appreciate it...
 

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Well, yes and no

The best you can do is adjust the clutch lever for the most play recommended. You can do this yourself, look in the manual. The more free play, the closer the lever will be to the grip with no effort. BUT the more free play the closer you are to not completely disengaging the clutch. Using a lever with a different contour won't help because the swing is reduced.

If you know someone with experience they could adjust the clutch for good release with max freeplay.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
The \"Book\" calls for 1/4 turn of free play at the thrust rod.
This cured my harsh engagement problem.
Adjust the lever 'till it's comfortable as long as there is no creeping or difficulty shifting.
 

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Fortunately, I've never had to adjust my clutch. Unfortunately, that means I don't know how :(
 

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Maybe an aftermarket lever.
 

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dcphoto said:
Maybe an aftermarket lever.
I've been looking (not too hard) for an aftermarket lever for the clutch. Found them for the brake only so far.
You could try to put a shim or spacer in between the lever and mount so that it's a little closer to the handle. I'm pretty happy with my positioning so far, just wish I could get a shorty lever!
 

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dcphoto said:
Maybe an aftermarket lever.


I got in a pinch once where I broke the clutch lever perch; After finding out no one in the Twin Cities area had the part in stock and not wanting to be bikeless during the weeklong wait for shipping, I tried an aftermarket clutch perch and lever that was designed for a dirt bike. The lever was considerably shorter and sat closer to the grip and had a wide range of adjustability. It was virtually a drop-in replacement and it worked fine for 3-4 months until I finally got around to getting the OEM replacement. I still carry that perch and lever in my saddlebag in case of emergency. Unfortunately, I don't remember the manufacturer (Fox, maybe?) and it's not printed on the lever or perch. Might be worth a shot...
 

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There is a limit to how much freeplay the clutch will tolerate. There is also a limit to how close the lever can be to the grip with an aftermarket lever. The issue is the release arm. Take the front sprocket cover off (three 8mm bolts, don't overtighten when reinstalling or else). You will see that the clutch cable connects to an arm. The arm has a lock nut on a slotted shaft. Loosen the lock nut a bit. Put a screwdriver in the slot but keep the wrench on the nut. Turn the screwdriver clockwise until you feel resistance. Turn the screwdriver counterclockwise 1/4 turn (a smidge less is acceptable). Hold the screwdriver in that position and tighten the lock nut. That's as close as you can adjust it.

What happens when you pull the clutch lever is that the arm rotates and moves the release rod into the clutch separating the plates. Too much freeplay at the lever and you may not be able to release the clutch all the way. This makes for notchy shifting and can eventually cause transmission damage. If you adjust the release rod too snug then when everything is up to temperature it may be too snug. In this case the release rod may be preventing the plates from engaging fully. This can lead to slipping and early clutch failure.

Adjust the release arm properly with the bike cold. Now pull the clutch all the way in and roll the bike forward in gear. You can adjust in more freeplay until you feel a change in clutch drag. That's as far as you should go. Note that an aftermarket lever that lies closer to the grip is the same as having more freeplay in the stock lever.

The problem with having things adjusted so closely is that you need to keep checking the adjustment. There's no room for cable stretch. If you ride more you should get used to the normal clutch position.
 
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