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Discussion Starter #1
Back again with another mold issue (smfh), this time its my Gaerne GP-1 boots. I neglected to clean these when I put them in the coat closet last year and never gave it a second thought. They are now covered in mold on both the leather outside and mesh lining on the inside. My concern is that with both of these areas being porous surfaces a poor or unsuccessful cleaning will result in mold spreading to the leg openings of my race suit. One suggestion I received from a leather shop was to brush off the leather to remove the dirt and mold, then spray them with de-salter and seal them in plastic bags for a day followed by a thorough shampoo and conditioning. Is this something I should bother cleaning or should I just replace the boots altogether. They aren't in bad shape and have only been crashed in once with minimal damage. Any other cleaning suggestions would be helpful and appreciated!
 

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I suppose a diluted bleach solution might work. You could also contact one of those mold removal companies and ask what they recommend.
 

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Again, try Borax! This is commonly used with laundry soap to clean stains, it's NOT bleach (shouldn't discolor anything), and works very well at inhibiting mold growth.

I've used it to get rid of mold on drywall and it's never come back.

P.S. Get a dehumidifier.
 

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Again, try Borax! This is commonly used with laundry soap to clean stains, it's NOT bleach (shouldn't discolor anything), and works very well at inhibiting mold growth.

I've used it to get rid of mold on drywall and it's never come back.

P.S. Get a dehumidifier.
I just read up on this and I think I'll seriously look into using this on my boots. I didn't use it on the bike because for a non-porous surface there's no need to use "harsh" cleaners, dish soap and some agitation will do the trick. I actually was reading and found that the military uses the same cleaning protocol for mold contamination that I did, they recommend a complete disassembly and thorough cleaning of each individual piece.

It's hard enough convincing my dad that we should leave the garage windows open for air circulation, I have to resort to just leaving the garage door open for a few hours when I get home from work every day to ensure we get some fresh air circulating in there.
 

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I gotta agree with snailman. My dehumidifier is for a giant area 800 sq. ft. and was just under $200. I would think that would be a pretty low price to pay to never have to deal with this again. And you just gotta plug it in and empty it every once in a while. Some of the nicer ones even have a hose attachment so you don't have to worry about emptying it.

I would say white vinegar would be my first try for cleaning the boots. It kills most mold species and shouldn't damage anything in the boot. Spray it down rinse it off after an hour. Should be safe for leather, not sure what other materials you have in the boots but I have used vinegar on plenty of laundry.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I gotta agree with snailman. My dehumidifier is for a giant area 800 sq. ft. and was just under $200. I would think that would be a pretty low price to pay to never have to deal with this again. And you just gotta plug it in and empty it every once in a while. Some of the nicer ones even have a hose attachment so you don't have to worry about emptying it.

I would say white vinegar would be my first try for cleaning the boots. It kills most mold species and shouldn't damage anything in the boot. Spray it down rinse it off after an hour. Should be safe for leather, not sure what other materials you have in the boots but I have used vinegar on plenty of laundry.
I agree that a humidifier would be great to use, we have one already but I'm not sure if it works so I'll have to check that out. My dad is also very stubborn and doesn't seem to care that we have an alarming number of rooms in the house where mold is becoming an issue. The seriousness of the issue and the health effects it can have do not seem to bother him at all. Me on the other hand, I'm ready to rip out the moldy drywall and find out whats going on.

Back to the point though, the boots are made up of leather, plastic, rubber, carbon fiber, and mesh. None of those surfaces seem like they would be negatively effected by borax or vinegar, I might just do a double treatment with both chemicals.
 

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Burn your house down. Collect insurance monies. Don't get everything wet next time.
 

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Burn your house down. Collect insurance monies. Don't get everything wet next time.
Haha, my first guess is poor insulation or failing insulation in 2-3 rooms in certain places. No need to burn the house down that's insurance fraud..
 

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Haha, my first guess is poor insulation or failing insulation in 2-3 rooms in certain places. No need to burn the house down that's insurance fraud..
Not if I burn it down.








:hiding:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, I took Snailman's recommendation and purchased Borax earlier this week, and just got done cleaning the boots earlier today.

For those interested in the treatment process, read below:

For the outside leather I mixed dawn dish soap and hot water in a sprayer bottle, sprayed then agitated the surface with a detailing brush and rinsed off the boots to clear away the mold suspended in the mixture. I avoided spraying Borax directly onto the leather as I did not know what effect it would have on the leather, if any. For the inside mesh material, I mixed Borax with hot water in a sprayer bottle, sprayed then lightly agitated the mesh with a soft bristle toothbrush. Following this, I used a shop vac to vacuum the mesh material to help extract some of the borax-water mixture and remove mold from within the mesh that may have been left behind. Finally, I filled each boot with water and dumped it out to help clear the remaining borax-water mixture.

Hopefully, this Borax treatment served to properly clean the boots and after they've had a few days to dry I should be ready to ride again. Luckily for me, my race suit, helmet, and gloves were all stored properly and so do not have any traces of mold. I will report back on how this treatment process worked out for any interested in seeing if this was actually effective.

Thanks for all the help!
 

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Thanks, I'm happy to say the boots are mold free at least I think they are as I haven't noticed any mold on them but I also haven't closely inspected them, will probably do that soon just to see what condition they are in.
 

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A Peets convection boot dryer is cheap and handy to have around.
Good for drying helmets and gloves too.

Lexol leather conditioner to add back lanolin to keep it pliable,
or a good quality saddle soap.

 

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First, rinse your shoes thoroughly with soapy water. Then treat with hydrogen peroxide, it is best to use cotton pads. Use not circular motions, but unidirectional motions, as if you are shaking dirt off your boots with this disc. Then you need to dry them very well, for example in the sun outside. (In winter, by the way, you can also use this method, since the frost also kills germs). Finally, treat with antifungal agents to prevent new mold forming. Also, do not forget about preventive cleaning of shoes, always dry them if they are wet, also store them in a cardboard box or paper bag. Can sometimes wipe it with hydrogen peroxide, this is a very good prophylaxis for shoes. This advice was taught to me when I was working at Mississauga Mold Removal. These are really very effective tips that have helped me and my friends more than once. Good luck!
 
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