Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,775 Posts
Can't find an edit button, but the feature is actually called "low rpm assist" or something like that.
I think it basically gives it throttle as you let out the clutch - so you don't have to.

No idea why you would want that, but everyone (cycle manufacturers) is trying to make motorcycles more appealing and transition scooter riders into motorcycle riders.

Whatever...
 

·
MOTORADOR
Joined
·
10,781 Posts
OP, I teach beginner, intermediate and advanced courses as well as clinics at the racetrack for one of the most respected rider education organizations in the world. Like many others around here, I made the mistake of "learning" how to ride on an SV —my first bike— eight years ago. Did I crash? No. Did I drop it and spent a lot of money fixing it? No. I actually fared pretty well and learned a lot. However —knowing everything I know today— I would love to go back in time and tell myself to get something lighter and more forgiving because now I realize how much more and faster I could have learned and how much more fun I could have had if only I could have focused more on developing riding skills and finesse instead of worrying about controlling the torque and power of the SV when I wasn't really ready for it — even though I told myself many times that I was.

So my recommendation is to go and get quality riding gear (head to toes) and spend one or two thousand bucks on a light bike that you can toss around and learn on until you are really ready for something bigger. Oh, and keep attending riding courses! You don't know what you don't know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Welcome to the forum! I don't listen to chaseontwowheels, he's a hack in my opinion. See what twowheelobsession, motorcyclist magazine, visordown motorcycles, spicy110, and Revzilla say on YouTube.
The difference in torque between the MT & SV is 3 Nm but the SV has more horsepower. Torque will not get you in trouble, horsepower will.
Get an after-market muffler (Delkevic or Fuel Exhausts) and the SV will be the best sounding bike of the three. A different handlebar is a cheap mod and can drastically change the ergonomics if the stock bar is too narrow or swept back too much for your liking.
Have you read the Cycleworld comparison of the three? I think it's pretty much on point.

Build thread | Instagram @sv650nyc
I 100% agree with that review as well. In motorcycle.com's comparo video they do a really good assessment of the the three and some other bikes. Motorcyclists magazines Ontwowheels episode also did a great review of sv vs the mt.

However to that end the z650, SV650, and mt-07 are quite similar so to the new rider the difference between them isn't that great (i'm greatly generalizing) and at the end of the day performance wise they're pretty similar so it mostly comes down to comfort and styling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I think it basically gives it throttle as you let out the clutch - so you don't have to.

No idea why you would want that, but everyone (cycle manufacturers) is trying to make motorcycles more appealing and transition scooter riders into motorcycle riders.

Whatever...
The RPM assist is really negligible, i honestly don't notice it and it's pretty nonintrusive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Can you just let out the clutch without giving it any throttle?

Yeah, It's a mechanical thing that opens up the throttle ever so slightly just enough to keep the bike from stalling under "normal operations/feathering the clutch." But it only opens up the throttle very very slightly.

That is to say if you just drop the clutch, you'll still stall out like a normal bike. I never had to learn to adjust to the addition of the Low RPM assist feature mostly because I simply don't notice it.

When playing with the feature tho and intentionally trying to stall, it seems that it's really made for people who are new to motorcycling and haven't figured out how a clutch works yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
921 Posts
The RPM assist is really negligible, i honestly don't notice it and it's pretty nonintrusive.
I notice it whilst riding through the CBD of town and people drive at about 15mph, I don't have to constantly do the clutch and throttle dance, I just let the bike pull itself along and if the cars are really slow then I begin using just the clutch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hello, new to the forum. I am a 54 year old soon to be new motorcycle rider.
I am trying to decide between the suzuki sv650, the kawasaki k650 and the yamaha mt-07. I have kind of eliminated the kawa 650 because of looks, sound and vibration. The mt-07 seems kind of like a young mans/womans bike and I am trying to stay alive and the mt-07 seems to have too much low end torque. I think I like the sv650 the most but one youtube review is really upsetting me. This review is highly critical of the sv650 sound, throttle response and ergonomics. It is on youtube by chaseontwowheels if you care to see it.

Any help deciding between these bikes would be appreciated.
I am 47 and have been test riding and searching for my new 2020 bike after passing the a2 test for brided(limited) licence approx 47.5 kw - the models are downtuned but react the similar on lower and mid revs to the full model - They are all good bikes my impressions are as follows SV650 precise acceleration it feels very much that the throttle turn relates to the revs, good brakes(although lots of reviews say otherwise), a very enjoyable ride, suspension feels stiff and precise, motor sound is good and acceleration is good, comfortable but with stiff suspension and seat could potentially be tiring. Kawasaki good acceleration sweet spot at 4000rpm motor felt strong - brakes good, was comfortable riding 183cm size 6ft... The MT07 has good power ,brakes , when accelerating it has this nice feeling of the motor revving but somehow you recieve the full acceleration but not the vibration almost like you have sponge handlegrips, very comfortable ride/seat and position. Also rode a duke 690 - not what I was expecting, very raw - super moto seat position, lots of noise and vibration -single cylinder - seemed lot a lot of work in traffic, I enjoyed the smoothness of the other bikes.

I am picking between SV650 and MT 07 - I got on the SV by chance and really enjoyed - I had not read about it or researched it all before riding so just go out and test ride some bikes it will surprise you - I had done lots of research on z650 and thought that was the bike for me, only to find after a few test rides I enjoyed the other bikes more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I am 47 and have been test riding and searching for my new 2020 bike after passing the a2 test for brided(limited) licence approx 47.5 kw - the models are downtuned but react the similar on lower and mid revs to the full model - They are all good bikes my impressions are as follows SV650 precise acceleration it feels very much that the throttle turn relates to the revs, good brakes(although lots of reviews say otherwise), a very enjoyable ride, suspension feels stiff and precise, motor sound is good and acceleration is good, comfortable but with stiff suspension and seat could potentially be tiring. Kawasaki good acceleration sweet spot at 4000rpm motor felt strong - brakes good, was comfortable riding 183cm size 6ft... The MT07 has good power ,brakes , when accelerating it has this nice feeling of the motor revving but somehow you recieve the full acceleration but not the vibration almost like you have sponge handlegrips, very comfortable ride/seat and position. Also rode a duke 690 - not what I was expecting, very raw - super moto seat position, lots of noise and vibration -single cylinder - seemed lot a lot of work in traffic, I enjoyed the smoothness of the other bikes.

I am picking between SV650 and MT 07 - I got on the SV by chance and really enjoyed - I had not read about it or researched it all before riding so just go out and test ride some bikes it will surprise you - I had done lots of research on z650 and thought that was the bike for me, only to find after a few test rides I enjoyed the other bikes more.
Hey there. Welcome to the fun. I know exactly how you feel.

I'm a 6' 240lb somewhat in shape 49 year old guy. I got a gut but I'm working on it. December 2016 I took delivery on a brand spankin' new sv650abs because the used bikes I looked at were hammered or priced too high. My cycle experience at that point was the beginner class that previous summer, and a ton of quadracer experience decades ago. Lots of hours on a bicycle in traffic too. I passed the class easily, and felt confident in my ability to take things slowly, be an adult...you know...moderate. I should be able to handle an sv no problem, right?

Lemme tell you, my first 3 months with my L7 was...not what I expected. Even with lots of off road experience with a clutch and throttle, I had a hell of a time training my paws to use them correctly on the sv. L7s are snatchy little fookers out of the factory and if you can't moderate engine braking and compensate for really ****ty throttle response (due to emission driven mapping) with clutchwork and proper braking, you are not going to like the sv. Or any mid-range fuel injected bike, for that matter. That's why it's a crappy starter bike.

At first.

Once you tame the engine a bit (I bought a PC5 and a different throttle to chill things out a bit ($$$)) and get your ergonomics and suspension situated (more $$$), you can start getting seat time that doesn't suck, and things start smoothing out. You will eventually start to develop the unconscious muscle responses that you need to ride a bike without killing yourself. It stops being scary and starts being fun.

But it took awhile. A long while. Longer than it would have if I was on a 500 beater that I didn't really care about, or whatever. I'm sure you get the point.

Long story short, it comes down to this: you have 2 tasks to contend with. First you have to learn to ride the bike. Fast and slow. Good road or bad.
Then you have to learn to ride it on the road, in traffic.

A fuel injected 650 is not the rebel 250 you learned on, at all. If you barely passed your class on the rebel, in a parking lot, with people telling you exactly what to do, I would recommend buying a more forgiving motorcycle.
Everyone has their own experience - I had not been on a powerful bike in 20 years and found the 2019 SV650 great - I had to redo my permit here in France the rider training is compulsory both on controlled obstacle / excercise course and then on the road 20 hours in total minimum and when the road module conducted you have walkie talkies with ear peices and the instructor giving you tips and directions (this gets very annoying by the end of the session but is useful) we were all riding the schools cb500's . The good thing here in France is that at least all the training from the start is on a 500cc which is a great idea (in Aus 20 years ago we did it all on 125cb and were only allowed 250cc for first year).After getting the a2 rider permit I fixed up a dt125 which everyone say great beginner bike - absolutely not - handling and brakes very questionable, acceleration up 90kmh great but after that very limited, as far as overtaking I was more comfortable overtaking in my mercedes vito van. I believe that a decently powered modern bike is much safer - better brakes/ handling and acceleration - yes we are beginners but enjoying the experience and extending the skills is part of it and for that you need to get a little more courage in small incriments - the courage for the dt125 is opening the throttle to max and reaching 125kmh in sixth maybe for the sv650 is winding it halfway in third for same result, at least with SV you would have a better chance of stopping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
good brakes(although lots of reviews say otherwise)
We all complain about SV brakes of pre-2019 models.
They featured tokico 2-piston calipers and questionable brake pads.
Since 2019 the SV features 4-piston tokico calipers, and braking has improved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I can't speak to the newer SVs but can to the second generation.
My newer-rider wife took up riding somewhat late in life, but has the advantages of having been an athlete and a devoted bicyclist.
After a few bikes, her '04 SV650S (with raised handlebars) is now, she declares, the "best bike in the whole world".
Since it followed a Honda NC700XDCT and a Versys 650LT (among others), there's some basis of comparison.
The SV's big advantages are its relatively light weight and its slimness. Those are very confidence-inspiring. Slimness in particular is often overlooked but a narrow bike is easier to manipulate and reassuring at low speeds.
The negatives were a torture-rack seat and too much abruptness in the throttle. Both were fixed: a Sargent seat (she's put them on all her "big" bikes) and a Steve's TRE widget to tame the snatch.
I do caution that the low handlebars of the S version can create problems for newer riders who aren't young, bendy, and athletic. I did a conversion installing Heli Multi-Tour Sport bars and the thing is comfortable enough so that 300-400 mile days are within reason for her.
All that said, the old Ninja 250s, which we've had a couple of, are some of the very best trainer bikes ever, in my experience. Not just the lightness, either. They're indestructible, cheap, have decent enough brakes and suspenders, and will teach clutch and engine speed control as well as anything ever made. Plus they have the capability to go on the highway- I rode our '07 on the Tollway at 80 in traffic all the time- and can go places. You may not stay too long with one, but it will help you get better on the fundamentals quickly and easily.
Honestly, I still kind of miss the little bugger.
But the SV is a perfectly good choice and I'd offer more about actually riding one but the Missus won't get off hers and let me try it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
From all accounts the MT-07 is a great bike. Hard to find a bad motorcycle these days. For me it was price and looks. I am an official old fart and the new transformer style in most new bikes is off-putting. The SV650 looks more like a motorcycle ought to to me. If you fit on both, get the one that makes you turn around twice and look at it as you walk away from it in a parking lot.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top