Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
merlot said:
RandyO said:
merlot said:
Ride to work 3 times a week and thats 90 miles per week on over-inflated tires which can cause uneven tire wear.

? I don't know how an over inflated tire will cause uneven wear on a bike tire... an over inflated tire will not heat up as much so it might not get as sticky as it should, but I don't see uneven wear and as long as the cold tire pressure is less than the max pressure on the side wall, I don't see any danger of catosrophic failure
Won't more air mean smaller contact patch which would have the center of the tire wear more than normal? I know motorcycle tires are shaped different than automobile tires, but I'm applying my knowledge from that area. Under-inflated tires wear more on the shoulders while over-inflated wear more in the center. A properly inflated tire would wear evenly (assuming correct alignment). Isn't this the same for a motorcycle tire?
not really, with radial tires anyway, you will wear your tire faster with less pressure cause the rubber will get hotter. I never heard of a tire wearing faster in the center from higher pressure, infact that is what has always been recommended to me to reduce center wear on the highway is to increase the pressure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
RandyO said:
merlot said:
RandyO said:
merlot said:
Ride to work 3 times a week and thats 90 miles per week on over-inflated tires which can cause uneven tire wear.

? I don't know how an over inflated tire will cause uneven wear on a bike tire... an over inflated tire will not heat up as much so it might not get as sticky as it should, but I don't see uneven wear and as long as the cold tire pressure is less than the max pressure on the side wall, I don't see any danger of catosrophic failure
Won't more air mean smaller contact patch which would have the center of the tire wear more than normal? I know motorcycle tires are shaped different than automobile tires, but I'm applying my knowledge from that area. Under-inflated tires wear more on the shoulders while over-inflated wear more in the center. A properly inflated tire would wear evenly (assuming correct alignment). Isn't this the same for a motorcycle tire?
not really, with radial tires anyway, you will wear your tire faster with less pressure cause the rubber will get hotter. I never heard of a tire wearing faster in the center from higher pressure, infact that is what has always been recommended to me to reduce center wear on the highway is to increase the pressure
Thanks for the info Randy. Guess I'll stop worrying about tire pressure, but I'll still check them frequently. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
[/quote]


? I don't know how an over inflated tire will cause uneven wear on a bike tire... an over inflated tire will not heat up as much so it might not get as sticky as it should, but I don't see uneven wear and as long as the cold tire pressure is less than the max pressure on the side wall, I don't see any danger of catosrophic failure[/quote]
Won't more air mean smaller contact patch which would have the center of the tire wear more than normal? I know motorcycle tires are shaped different than automobile tires, but I'm applying my knowledge from that area. Under-inflated tires wear more on the shoulders while over-inflated wear more in the center. A properly inflated tire would wear evenly (assuming correct alignment). Isn't this the same for a motorcycle tire?[/quote]


Not exactly. A underinflated tire will still wear more on the outside of the normal contact patch but will also wear the center of the contact patch out faster. Underinflated tires expand to almost normal tire shell dimensions when warmed up and rotated at speed. Witch will show on your tire like a flat spot in the tire but it will look more u shaped than flat in the center..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
My understanding is that there is a 1 PSI increase in pressure for each 10degree increase in temp. Your tires get pretty hot after a long ride on a hot day. The cold temp is what is recommended to be able to handle those temps/pressures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Thanks for the reminder. I for one have overlooked this important little bit of maintenance. I am gonna check 'em when I get home tonight.

I didn't ride today...to much rain :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
merlot said:
I'm essentially riding on over-inflated tires for ~30 miles. Ride to work 3 times a week and thats 90 miles per week on over-inflated tires which can cause uneven tire wear.
Again as I said before tire engineers have already factored sun and weather temp changes into the design of the tire.

As mentioned it is good that you are anal about your tires but that being said you are creating more work for yourself. :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I'm no tire specialist but I've always thought that the recommended tire pressure included temp change. As in 33 front, tire is comfortable a few psi higher from heat or a few psi lower from cold. In 2 years of riding, it was the first time I found a tire significantly under-pressure. I got decent mileage out of most of my tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Thanks for the reminder, I checked them this spring but have been lazy about it lately. I checked them yesterday and they were both down in the low 20's.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
Nimbus said:
My understanding is that there is a 1 PSI increase in pressure for each 10degree increase in temp. Your tires get pretty hot after a long ride on a hot day. The cold temp is what is recommended to be able to handle those temps/pressures.
back in may while on vacation at deals gap, I checked my hot pressures and was surprised how much increase in pressure there was

I run my Azaro STs cold 36F/42R, fully warmed up, they were 46F/46R
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
seems that reminding a motorcycle rider to check his tire pressure is sorta like reminding a chef .. "turn the oven on like so... "

basic motorcycle maintence.. check it at the very least once a month.. but I personally do it just before every ride..

although once I set it I don't worry about it anymore unless it was way off or something.

I guess that changing the airpressures just cuz it's cold out could make a small difference in tear wear.. .. I dunno I would think it would be like gauging them cold.. the tearing off for a 20 mile ride to get them good and hot then taking some of the air back out so it's back at normal..

I believe tire manufacturers specify "cold" temps for the tires because they expect them to heat up and inflate to the actual proper range with heat..

I think in effect what you are doing is forcing your tire out of the manufacturers range by gauging a warm tire and expecting it to be the same temp as a cold tire.. by way of the sun.. but it's still warm.. doesn't matter how it got that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
A cold tire usually means a tire that has sat idle for hours and is usually independant of the ambient temparture. So although it may be 100 degrees out, the tire is still cold if it hasn't been used. This is my reasoning for adjusting the pressure to match the conditions. This way when the tire heats up, the pressure should be about the same despite the differences in ambient tempature.

For example, if it's 60 degrees in the morning and my pressure is set at 33psi, let's assume once it gets up to operating temperature, it's at 38psi. Now later in the day the temps go up to 80 degrees and the sun is shining, my cold temp could be close to it's earlier operating temp of 38psi. Once I get moving and the tire warms up even more, the psi could be well into the 40's. By adjusting the cold temp back down to 33psi, I can expect the operating psi to be the about same as it was in the moring.

That's been my reasoning for adjusting the way I do. I suppose it's overkill and I'll not worry about it as much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
merlot said:
A cold tire usually means a tire that has sat idle for hours and is usually independant of the ambient temparture. So although it may be 100 degrees out, the tire is still cold if it hasn't been used. This is my reasoning for adjusting the pressure to match the conditions. This way when the tire heats up, the pressure should be about the same despite the differences in ambient tempature.

For example, if it's 60 degrees in the morning and my pressure is set at 33psi, let's assume once it gets up to operating temperature, it's at 38psi. Now later in the day the temps go up to 80 degrees and the sun is shining, my cold temp could be close to it's earlier operating temp of 38psi. Once I get moving and the tire warms up even more, the psi could be well into the 40's. By adjusting the cold temp back down to 33psi, I can expect the operating psi to be the about same as it was in the moring.

That's been my reasoning for adjusting the way I do. I suppose it's overkill and I'll not worry about it as much.
Way off, it's been said, and don't quote me on this but if your tire goes up 10% (from cold) degrees then you've set the cold pressure correctly. If it goes up more than this, put more air in (under-inflated tire heats up more), less than this, take out a little air. This is for track but can be followed for street in most cases, well except running to the store a mile away. I think you've passed anal retentive, and went straight to obsessive compulsive behavior. :lol: :p

Grav.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
Being anal pays off. 20psi. Attributed to the huge nail stuck in the rear tire. This sucks... first day in weeks I don't have to worry about T-Storms and I can't ride. :x
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top