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Discussion Starter #1
The chain on the bike needs some love and care...

It needs to be clean and tighten...

Once I used Diesel fuel to clean the chain on another bike.

Is there anything better out there for such a task ?

Once clean, I have to tighten the chain but I have a few concern...

How much tighten, how to keep the wheel center aligned and can it all be done while the bike resting on the wheel or do I need to lift the bike ?

I have a jack for cruisers but not for sport bike, has anyone ever used such jack for a sport bike ?

Also the bike came with spools, I wonder if I could use a set of car stands to put underneath the spools and support the bike that way ?

Here are some pictures of the chain at its current state...

Should the chain be resting on the frame the way shown on the picture ?

How much slack should I able to have on the bottom part of the chain ?



 

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Use Kerosene and a tooth brush to clean the chain. Adjustment can be made while on the side stand. Slack should be 0.8-1.2"
 

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Use Kerosene and a tooth brush to clean the chain. Adjustment can be made while on the side stand.
Agreed, you can support it with jack stands at this point to make it easier to clean, then put it on the side stand to adjust it.

Slack should be 0.8-1.2"
Or 20-30mm. (metric is easier for me)


Edit: Oh, and there are many opinions on what to lube the chain with but I won't start that here, you can search the forum for that and should get enough info to decide for yourself.
 

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from the pics of your finger pushing up the chain, it looks like the right amount of slack.
 

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Check your chain tension in several spots as you rotate the back wheel. Adjust at the *tightest* spot.
 

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from the pics of your finger pushing up the chain, it looks like the right amount of slack.
Thats what i'm thinking. When I push on my chain it touches the swing arm, I will need to adjust mine soon.

But it looks fine too me. You need at least a inch of slack, Have someone sit on the bike and compress the shock and you will see how tight the chain will get.
 

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When it's not under tension at the top the chain will rest on the plastic rubbing block. That's normal.

The easiest way to ensure that the rear wheel is in alignment is to measure from the swingarm pivot to the rear axle. The two measurements should be within 1/16". If you align it first you can count adjuster bolt flats to keep it straight (turn 3 flats on one side, turn 3 flats on the other).
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Symptoms

Well, if it looks like it is adjusted properly then I won't mess it with, I just clean it. I will have the wife sit on the bike so that I can check the slack under pressure as well.

Where can I buy a little bit of Kerosene ?

Also,

The reason I wanted to check on the chain tension is because some times the bike just doesn't feel right when I am down shifting or I let it roll on a gear that is too high for the current speed. It sound weird and feels weird, like if the chain is going to slip off the sprocket or something like that...

Also, I am not too sure about all the dry oil/lube accumulated around and below the front sprocket cover, is that normal ?

Also, the first day I got it I wanted to haul it to my house, 83mi trip, but the trailer broke so I actually had to ride the bike home and the shifting was hard, first/second gear, and it was hard to find neutral, when shifting into first and second, you will hear the clunk sound every time.

My friends owns a Victory cruiser and that shifting clunk sound is normal on his bike, but I never seen a bike like this with such a clunk, I owned another SV before. After an oil change with Rotella oil the clunk has gone away and now it goes into first very smooth with just a click, and I can find neutral easier.

I understand that because the V engine, the SV model is known to have a more abrupt engine breaking then other bikes, but this bike is really jerky on lower gears when taking corners so I wonder what could be going on... ?

Some one advised that SV are very sensitive to synchronization, if the two cylinders are not in sync correctly the engine will not run smooth.

This is a 2005 Naked SV with only 5K mi, seems like it was baby by the first owner, it doesn't look like it was ran hard at all, so I don't think this bike at this age should be suffering from anything weird... But who knows...

 

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Discussion Starter #10
Doesn't anyone read the owner's manual?
I just got the bike used and it did not come with an owner's manual.

I am sure I can find one online if I do a search or just buy one from the local dealer.

But thanks for your help any ways.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I just learned that the preferred chain lube around here is this DuPont stuff from Lowes. Which of the can is the right one ? What color can ?



I have tried that chain wax in the past and I just don't like all that sticky stuff so I would like to try something else... That DuPont stuff sounds interesting...

I wonder what is the best method to apply the stick chain wax if I end up using it anyways, when I spray it, that sticky white foam seems to go every where else except where it needs to go. What is the trick ?

The guy who sold me the bike gave me this, but it feels just the same as the Maxima Chain Wax.


I used this in the past and I did not like it so I have a can laying around.
 

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remove the plastic cover from the front sprocket,(3 small bolts, be gentle putting them back in, and carefully wiggle the cover off). clean the area around the chain and sprocket so you can check for leaks. a lot of oil and gunk buildup there is normal from the chain lube, probably no leak there but it's good to check since you just got the bike.

any chain lube that says it's safe for o ring chains is ok. owners manual actually says to use a heavy weight motor oil.
 

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I just got the bike used and it did not come with an owner's manual.

I am sure I can find one online if I do a search or just buy one from the local dealer.

But thanks for your help any ways.
Send me your email, in a pm if you prefer, and I will send you the pdf of the owner's manual and the service manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, as you can see the chain on those pictures, it looks a lot healthier then it was when I got the bike...

Here is what I did...

1. Brushed the chain with Kerosene to remove the heavy duty rust and grime.

2. Rinse the chain down with WD40, the spray pressure help blow away some of the particles and WD40 lubricates as well as penetrates some of the stubborn inner grime.

3. Dry clean the chain with breaks parts cleaner ?

4. Finally lube the chain with Bel Ray wax...

So far Bel Ray is the one I like the most.

I got the DuPont chain wax from Lowe's but I did not like how that drys up.

If I keep good care of the chain and clean it often enough, I don't even have to use Kerosene, all I need to do is rise the chain with WD40 before each lube.



How about this one, is different from the blue can that I found at Lowe's

 

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considering the manual says clean with kerosene and lube with heavy weight motor oil, any chain lube will be ok. in the past 33 years i've used just about everything out there. it's all good.
 

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One thing to clarify, since someone mentioned slack on the top side of the chain can allow it to rest on the rub guard- Make sure when checking the chain slack on the bottom side that the bike is in gear and you've rolled it backwards till it stops moving. At least, that's how I was taught to check it. Anyone have feedback? It'd be nice to know if there's a more appropriate method.

Also, SVibe, be careful with that Brake Parts cleaner. I love how that stuff works on certain contaminants, but I believe some (if not all) of the formulations can be harmful to rubber, and you chain likely has o-rings that might be compromised by the cleaner.

I have been using the yellow Liquid Wrench spray bottle to lube my chain, but it was used and near the end of it's life when I picked up the bike. I've pushed it way past where I should have and am about to get a new chain and sprockets. I'm going to continue my method of Grunge brush and Kerosene every 1500-2000 miles (unless the chain gets noticeably soiled before this), and giving it a liberal shot of lube every couple fill-ups, or after any extended ride in the rain.

I like the dry lube formulations. I had one specifically designed for my mountain bike while at college, and applying it once a year kept the chain looking amazing.. clean and rust free. The one time I decided to clean it, I was stupid enough to wait to lube it til it was dried out, and forgot for a few days as it sat outside. The chain was rusting before the end of the week and it took a lot more attention to clean it up again before lubing.

I'm contemplating a scott-oiler or similar setup.. Anyone had a BAD experience with such a device? Any negatives aside from a little more fling from the chain?
 
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