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My SV has 22.XK on the odo now. I got it at 13.1K. At 18K I put a Metzler Z6 rear on it to replace the worn Z4 and was very happy with the new rubber. Sometime in the next few months the front will get done too.

I commute on the bike a lot, and the chain adjustment wasn't quite right for a while. The chain ran smooth at first, but being a newb to bikes and chains I didn't take the best care of it. I then measured it and it was stretched right up to the upper limit around 16K. At 18K it was still adjusting and running smoothly, but by 20K something wierd happened. When adjusting the slack, it wasn't the same as you rotated the tire. It was tighter in some spots than others, letting me know some of the links were now stretched.

I have done lots of chain work in packaging equipment for the food industry and knew this was a bad sign, so I ordered a new EK525 110 link chain from Oneida. When the chain came in, I realized I didn't have the tools to install the chain, and I was switching jobs making my commute 75 miles one way instead of 30. I ordered EK's new bolt on master link from my local dealer. In the meantime the 150 mile commute was taking its toll on the chain. It was making awful noises, but lubing every other day and cleaning helped. If it got rained on, it was way noisier.

Finally I got a chance to do the chain today and had all the parts. Well the old chain was rough, but it was damn strong still. It probably never would've broken, but it probably would've started chewing teeth of the sprockets. I didn't have a chain breaker, so I tried twisting the chain apart with some pry bars and popping the links with a good tool steel chisel and hammer.... no dice. I ended up cutting it partially with a hacksaw and breaking it apart. Dang it was a strong chain.

So on goes the new chain easy as pie. I took the little cover off exposing the front sprocket, the chain guard, and heel guard on the chain side. It is an easy job with all this stuff off. I installed the bolt on master link per the instructions. Basically it has long threaded pins and the bolts mash the pins at the side of the link similar to what a chain installation tool would do. You then break off the extra length of the pins and viola. It works like a champ and makes chain installation a breeze for the DIY type. No special tools needed! The parts cost me just under $100 with the chain, shipping and link.

So how does the bike ride now? Oh my gosh! You wouldn't believe the difference new chain can make. So smooth.... a lot less lurching (I was running the old chain loose to help it last through the commuting). A lot of funny noises are gone now thank goodness, and acceleration from a start is way smoother.

Check your chain if you have some miles on your SV...... it might be worth it to change. It is very easy to DIY too with a rear stand, basic handtools and a hacksaw with EKs new bolt on master link. And for the record, I couldn't find a cheaper good O-ring style chain for the SV than the one I bought. It looks to be every bit as good or slightly better than the OEM chain too.

I didn't change the sprockets. They had minor wear, but nothing alarming. I'll probably get another 20K out of this chain with the sprockets, then I can worry about a new chain and new sprockets. By then, I'll probably have a newer fuel injected ride.
 

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Interesting to read. I'm glad it didn't turn out to be something horrific. Plus, it's nice to know it will be an easy job one day for me. Thanks for taking the time to write it.
 

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Yea a slightly worn chain can go bad quickly, like rip half the bike apart and take part of you with it. I think that ranks right up on there for things Im nervous about when I ride, scarry if you really think about it.
 

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If you didn't replace the sprockets along with the chain, especially at 22k miles, your new chain isn't going to last very long.
 

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zoltan said:
If you didn't replace the sprockets along with the chain, especially at 22k miles, your new chain isn't going to last very long.
Yes, I killed one of my RK gold chains in 4k miles by doing that...I was aware of it, just lazy, but damn.
 

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AnthonyS said:
 

I didn't change the sprockets.  They had minor wear, but nothing alarming.  I'll probably get another 20K out of this chain with the sprockets, then I can worry about a new chain and new sprockets.  By then, I'll probably have a newer fuel injected ride. 
Mistake, even if sprockets don't look worn, they are, I give your new chain no more than 8k before you have to replace it again.
 
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