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Discussion Starter #1
So I ride the hell out of my bike, like 5K in one year. I lubricate my chain about 3-4 times a week, as well as wipe it off between uses to get all that road crap off of it.

My question: When will my chain due to be changed? Is it based on condition or age?

Thanks
 

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Hall Monitor
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Condition.

Chains stretch over time. A stretched out chain may have stretched unevenly- you'll go to set the slack in it and find that in some spots it is tight and in other spots it is loose (also happens with an out-of-round sprocket, but that's another story).

One way to check is to try to pull the links away from the rear sprocket- if you can pull the chain a certain distance off the sprocket (the figure escapes me at this point) then the chain is worn out. A better but more tedious method is to measure the distance between a certain number of pins in the chain- beyond a certain measure (provided by the manufacturer) the chain is stretched out.

One other thing to consider is that the sprockets wear out along with the chain. The sprockets tend to take on a fish hook sort of shape. Put a new chain on worn-out sprockets and you'll be replacing the chain again in the not-too-distant future.

All that being said, a well cared for o-ring chain should go 20 to 30,000 miles before needing to be replaced.

HTH

Bill
 

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+1 , Always replace the sprockets along with your chain.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
bmetz99 said:
"...One way to check is to try to pull the links away from the rear sprocket- if you can pull the chain a certain distance off the sprocket (the figure escapes me at this point) then the chain is worn out..."
IIRC, the missing value is half a tooth; if you can pull the chain off the sprocket enought to see half a tooth, it's time to go shopping! 10-15K miles is probably a reasonable expectation for chain life, although I have read of folks going 30K+.

Me personally, when it's time for a new chain there's no question: my bike just doesn't feel right or sound right.

:)
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Chains and sprockets go hand in hand. Usually if one is wearing out, the other one is getting there too. It all depends on alot of junk...riding habits, how often you adjust (and how correctly you do it), and the general maintenance on the sprock and such...if the chain has a lot of play in and out or it feels "stretchy" chances are its ready for a new one.
 

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5K in one year isnt a whole lot for alot of riders on this board....12k is about what I do in a year, and my chains last at least that. Generally the winter does kill my chain though. No matter how many times I clean it and lube it, road salt will get it quickly. Generally I'd say change sprockets and chain together, but in my case, my rear sprocket didnt last long...at all...so its simply not worth it to toss out a clean front sprocket and a great condition chain.

Changing your chain should be mainly focused on condition and not age. Although age can go hand in hand with condition if age means winters, stored outside, lack of maintainence, etc. When I start to get links that are stiff enough to feel the "crunch" vibration in the foot pegs, thats my change the chain sign.
 

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evilbologna said:
5K in one year isnt a whole lot for alot of riders on this board....12k is about what I do in a year, and my chains last at least that. Generally the winter does kill my chain though. No matter how many times I clean it and lube it, road salt will get it quickly. Generally I'd say change sprockets and chain together, but in my case, my rear sprocket didnt last long...at all...so its simply not worth it to toss out a clean front sprocket and a great condition chain.

Changing your chain should be mainly focused on condition and not age. Although age can go hand in hand with condition if age means winters, stored outside, lack of maintainence, etc. When I start to get links that are stiff enough to feel the "crunch" vibration in the foot pegs, thats my change the chain sign.
evile, what kind of sprocket you running that the rear sprocket wears first, is it made out of chocolate? I run an aluminum rear, and the front steel sprocket is the first thing to go, in fact I usually have teeth missing before I see signs of chain or rear sprocket wear.

I'm going to try mounting my scottoiler on my front sprocket and see it it makes a difference
 
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