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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So what do you people do to maintain your chains? Other than tightening, is it really nessicary to clean and lube on a regular basis? I used to lube my chain, but I got tired of it making a mess every time I did. I stopped about 7K miles ago, all I do now is tighten it, and have not had any problems. ???
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
mine doesnt rust. Its got a layer of filth on it so its in its own little enviroment. Arent they o-ring chains? If they are how is lubing them going to extend the life of the chain? How does the lube get past the O rings? Isnt it the stretch that kills the chain anyway?
 

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i use castrol chain wax i just ride it around a bit to let the chain heat up and then spray it till it has enough but not enough to fling i all over. 11,000 miles on the stock chain. i'll probally get the 520 kit in the spring though and see how that goes.
 

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That Guy said:
mine doesnt rust. Its got a layer of filth on it so its in its own little enviroment. Arent they o-ring chains? If they are how is lubing them going to extend the life of the chain? How does the lube get past the O rings? Isnt it the stretch that kills the chain anyway?

I think it was Kevin on this board who described it thus: You're cleaning and lubricating the o-rings themselves, not the chain links. It is dirty/dried out o-rings which fail and allow dirt, water, sand, etc. into the chain links which causes chains to fail (frozen links); the chain may also stretch excessively when the links become unlubricated (when they lose their factory grease pack on account of the o-rings failing). Chain lubing is just one of those necessary evils to riding a bike, I guess. If you hate cleaning and lubing your chain, RandyO swears by an automatic chain oiler called the Scottoiler. Apparently the only time his chain gets touched is periodic tension adjustments and normal replacement. Might be something to look into... HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Six Chin Skinny said:
I think it was Kevin on this board who described it thus: You're cleaning and lubricating the o-rings themselves, not the chain links. It is dirty/dried out o-rings which fail and allow dirt, water, sand, etc. into the chain links which causes chains to fail (frozen links); the chain may also stretch excessively when the links become unlubricated (when they lose their factory grease pack on account of the o-rings failing). Chain lubing is just one of those necessary evils to riding a bike, I guess. If you hate cleaning and lubing your chain, RandyO swears by an automatic chain oiler called the Scottoiler. Apparently the only time his chain gets touched is periodic tension adjustments and normal replacement. Might be something to look into... HTH
Very good points
 

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What Six Chin said is correct. And RandyO isn't the only one, tons of people with all sorts of bikes love their Scott Oilers. I haven't gotten to that point yet, personally.

mine doesnt rust. Its got a layer of filth on it so its in its own little enviroment.
This is pretty laughable - so if you can't see it, it's not happening? There are a lot more things in my life I need to stop washing.

I go with 300-400 mile intervals, less if it's been a lot of wet rides, longer if I have to (manual says you can go up to 600). Every lube or three (or when I see it needs it) I do a good cleaning with Kerosene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Red Raevyn said:
What Six Chin said is correct. And RandyO isn't the only one, tons of people with all sorts of bikes love their Scott Oilers. I haven't gotten to that point yet, personally.

This is pretty laughable - so if you can't see it, it's not happening? There are a lot more things in my life I need to stop washing.

I go with 300-400 mile intervals, less if it's been a lot of wet rides, longer if I have to (manual says you can go up to 600). Every lube or three (or when I see it needs it) I do a good cleaning with Kerosene.
It was meant to be more or a vivid explanation of how dirty my chain is, and as implied it is extremely dirty. So other than a scott oiler, if you go on a 1200 mile ride your tellin me that every 600 you stop at an overlook and spray a lil juice on that badboy? :eek:
 

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Heh just quoting the manual. I don't think I've done more than 580 in one day - 1200 in one day at an average speed of 50 mph (meaning you're actually on the freeway going 70ish but you stop for gas) is running for 24 hours straight. On long trips I take a small can of lube and hit it once a day. If I was doing some kind of massochistic marathon and did ride 1000+ miles in a day, yeah, I probably would stop at an overlook or something and spray it =P.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Red Raevyn said:
Heh just quoting the manual. I don't think I've done more than 580 in one day - 1200 in one day at an average speed of 50 mph (meaning you're actually on the freeway going 70ish but you stop for gas) is running for 24 hours straight. On long trips I take a small can of lube and hit it once a day. If I was doing some kind of massochistic marathon and did ride 1000+ miles in a day, yeah, I probably would stop at an overlook or something and spray it =P.
Who said anything about it being it being done in one day? 1200 miles in one day or three is still 1200 miles. So that what kind of chain life can you see out of a properly oiled chain Vs. one that does not get touched. Ive got close to 11k on mine and its still ok, im sure its not great, but I have no doubt that it will hit 15K+ with no problem and in my opinion thats perty good service. Not like replacin DB chains.
 

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Guy - even though the innards of the chain are protected by the internal lube and oil rings, there are other concerns. The biggest is the "grinding paste" created by the dirt-sand-grease-goop that is on your chain and sprockets right now. Tiny little pieces of sand stuck in that junk will act just like a grinding stone at high speed on your chain and sprockets, and will without a doubt cause it to fail faster than if you kept it cleaned and lubed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
gahdzila said:
Guy - even though the innards of the chain are protected by the internal lube and oil rings, there are other concerns. The biggest is the "grinding paste" created by the dirt-sand-grease-goop that is on your chain and sprockets right now. Tiny little pieces of sand stuck in that junk will act just like a grinding stone at high speed on your chain and sprockets, and will without a doubt cause it to fail faster than if you kept it cleaned and lubed.
Ahh fair enough! Didnt even think of that one.
 

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gahdzila said:
Guy - even though the innards of the chain are protected by the internal lube and oil rings, there are other concerns. The biggest is the "grinding paste" created by the dirt-sand-grease-goop that is on your chain and sprockets right now. Tiny little pieces of sand stuck in that junk will act just like a grinding stone at high speed on your chain and sprockets, and will without a doubt cause it to fail faster than if you kept it cleaned and lubed.



Great point-- Another argument in favor of a non-sticky chain lube; I currently use Chain-wax, but the recent buzz about the Teflon lube from DuPont has really caught my attention. Next time I pass a Lowe's, I'm stopping in for a can. Coverage (penetrating film) and dry-ability should be superb, but I do wonder about the temperature effects, which I think is a weak point for chain waxes...
 

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gahdzila said:
Guy - even though the innards of the chain are protected by the internal lube and oil rings, there are other concerns.  The biggest is the "grinding paste" created by the dirt-sand-grease-goop that is on your chain and sprockets right now.  Tiny little pieces of sand stuck in that junk will act just like a grinding stone at high speed on your chain and sprockets, and will without a doubt cause it to fail faster than if you kept it cleaned and lubed.
Also, the rollers aren't sealed. They do require cleaning and lubrication. You should be able to rotate each and every roller on your chain with gentle pressure from your finger. If the rollers dont 'roll', they slide on to the sprockets and accellerate wear.
 

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First of all, but high quality components. I was using Sprocket Specialist stuff and now that I've switched to Renthal sprockets, I can say that Sprocket Specialists (even with the Titan Tough coating) stuff is crap; nothing but garbage. You have to wait forever just to get Sprocket Specialists components and it's poor quality aluminum anyways. Shitty sprockets make a phenomenal chain look like a peice of junk.

Someone else on this board recommended putting kerosene in a spray bottle. What a fantastic idea!!! Chain cleanings take me no longer than 5 minutes. I spray the chain down with kerosene, using an old t-shirt or rag to wipe off all the grime and reveal the sparkling gold links of my DID Pro chain and then I spray it down with whatever chain wax or lube I can find. Maxima chain wax works great, but anything that keeps the O-rings wet will work.

Lube more often if you ride in rain or dusty/dirty conditions.

Still, I think the key a healthy chain is to start off with quality components and then worry about routine maintenance.
 

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I just got 18,000 miles out of the current chain on my bike.....haha. But it's stretched to hell and back. So now I'm awaiting the 520 chain, 14/46 tooth combo set to arrive on my door, hopefully by tommorrow! ;D
 

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Is the chain wax you guys are talking about a spray or not? Sounds like it is something your wipe on.

My experience has been with dirtbike chains and all I use after a buddy recommended it to me is WD-40 :eek:. No it is not sticky but it lubes the chain good and I make it over almost 1.5-2 years on the stock chain. Of course I clean it everytime I ride and re-spray with WD-40 and spray it once while riding at the track during the day. It keeps the chain clean and lubed. The Maxima, PJ1 and other sticky sprays attracted too much dang dirt and crap on my previous chains and they wore out much quicker and they were a pain in the butt to clean.

For street I know I need something better and mine is due for a cleaning and lube. Whoever sprayed mine at the dealer put a good coat of something on mine because it is still nice and greasy but needs cleaning.

As far as sprockets go, why not get a ultralight steel sprocket (if they make them for street) because the aluminum will wear out quicker than a steel anyday.
 

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My chain has over 19000 miles and still looks new the only part that seems to have some deterioration is the front sprocket the rear sprocket also looks new at this pace i should be able to get well over 20000 miles out of this set up,my maintenance consists of every 500-600 miles clean with a rag soaked in kerosene then use the grunge brush to loosen up the dirt reapply the kerosene soaked rag then i use a clean rag to remove the kerosene wait about 15 minutes for the remaining kerosene to evaporate then i use Honda chain lube,I've only adjusted the chain once at 600 miles,so in my opinion as long as you keep the chain clean and lubed there is minimal stretch to the chain.
 

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I just bought my 2002 used and the chain is really dirty and grungy. So, from this topic, I should buy some kerosene (where do I buy this?) and put it in a spray bottle and spray down the chain and wipe it off. Then buy some chain wax of some sort and do the same? I really want to get my new baby all ready for next riding season. Thanks - Skister
 
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