Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I finally pick up my bike from a dealer (due to a part being on back order - unrelated to this story) when I also did my 4K miles service. While doing a routine check up at home prior to taking it to the dealer, I noticed that my chain is loose. I based that upon the fact that the lower part of the chain can go up 2-3 inches, which is much more then allowed per manual.

I took it to the dealer and said that should be checked and tightened as a part of the 4K miles service. As I was picking it up today, I wanted to make sure that was done, and guess what, it was not. I know shocker....good choice on a dealer, etc. Obviously I was upset, turned around and spoke to the guy at the counter who checked it himself, said "it is on a loose side" and took it in again.

If only that was the end of the story..I am looking at this guy talking to another mechanic in the garage and I see that they are having a heated discussion about my bike. A few minutes later, the mechanic comes to me and takes me inside and provides me with a drawing saying: "I just had to explained this to this again, but I want to explain this to you too..." and goes telling me that my chain is just perfect (even thought it can touch the bottom of th swingarm) that when I ride it, and due to my weight ( 225) it will be perfect even thought it looks loose right now. He talked about positive and negative angle of the swing arm and how sport bikes have a negative angle, how it is a myth that it should be tighter, an so on

Now, I am a bit mechanically challenged so the way he was explaining made sense, but my doubt is that it was way off from the manual, the other guy that works that agreed with me not with him, as well as, by friends bike, just got off 600 mile service had much tighter chain.

Note: while talking to me, he was very obviously mad, and frustrated, so much that his lips were shaking, as well as his hands.

I do not trust this man. I do not trust that dealership..Am I wrong and are they right? Please help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,461 Posts
Ask him to pull out the manual.  Then slap him with it. and btw, you do not have to be mechanically inclined to work on a bike. You do have to see someone work on it and basicly next time repeat what they do and it helps to have instructions.

ie. for my 11k mile check up, the cost is $160. Most of it is oil and filter change{which is ridiculously easy}, Clean, lube and adjust chain,{easy to moderate hard}, tighten chasis bolts that move alot,{easy}, air filter check {easy}. I'm not sure when air bleeding brakes and radiator shoud be done but that is also ridicously easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I assume you have a second gen, but here is what the first gen manual states
Inspect the drive chain slack before each use of the motorcycle. Place the motorcycle on the side stand. The drive chain should be adjusted for .8 - 1.2 Inch of slack, as show.
There is a diagram detailing to check mid-way between the sprockets.

This tells me it should be adjusted without anyone on the bike. Check your manual if you have a second gen.
Hope this helps
to
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,461 Posts
2nd gen is the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
First things first....NO ONE CARES ABOUT YOUR BIKE LIKE YOU DO.   I prefer to care for my own new SV despite having a  warranty.  I think part of owning a motorcycle is working on it and familiarizing yourself with it.  Oil changes, chain adjustment, gapping spark plugs, adjusting clutch and throttle cables.  I think that is all part of the experience of being a motorcyclist.  I would read the manual and learn for yourself.  
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I forgot to say that I actually have a gsxr 750 '05. I do not think it matters since the manual shows the same numbers. I do change my oil/oil filter myself, tighten every bold I see, check my air filer, etc. (but not much etc) I try to do as much as I can, however for the official tune-ups, as per manual, I prefer to have a professional mechanic do that, just for the peace of my mind, but this is the first time in that dealership and I just do not trust them much. I went there because they are convenient (close to my work).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
I think the mechanic makes a good point.


Your chain is not supposed to be really tight when you're sitting on it. The more you weigh, the more slack you need to leave in realization of this.

And...it's better to be too loose than too tight.....unless you're ridiculously loose floppin' off the sprocket.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
Ben_JamminVFCC said:
  I think the mechanic makes a good point. 


  Your chain is not supposed to be really tight when you're sitting on it.  The more you weigh, the more slack you need to leave in realization of this.

And...it's better to be too loose than too tight.....unless you're ridiculously loose floppin' off the sprocket.
NO, the riders weight has absolutely nothing to do with chain adjustment, it's supose to be exactly as the manual sez no matter what the rider weights, the slack takes into account MAXIMUM possible swingarm travel

if you look at the geometry of your swingarm, the chain will tighten up to a point then as it dips further, it will loosen again

yes, it is better to be too loose than too tight but the swingarm doesn't travel any more with a heavy rider than it does a light one, at 300lb, geared up, there are not many riders heavier than me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
RandyO said:
NO, the riders weight has absolutely nothing to do with chain adjustment, it's supose to be exactly as the manual sez no matter what the rider weights, the slack takes into account MAXIMUM possible swingarm travel

if you look at the geometry of your swingarm, the chain will tighten up to a point then as it dips further, it will loosen again

yes, it is better to be too loose than too tight but the swingarm doesn't travel any more with a heavy rider than it does a light one, at 300lb, geared up, there are not many riders heavier than me.
QFT

Its like this.

The chain tightens as the swingarm moves up. There has to be a certain amount of slack so that it doesnt go TOO tight and restrict swingarm movement (bad enough) and put a ton of stress on your transmission's countershaft (really bad). Thing is, just because you weigh more, it doesnt mean that the swingarm is going to move past its maximum travel.... which is what the slack is set to account for. Furthermore, if you're a heavier rider, you need to setup your suspension's preload to compensate for that... so that your static sag is appropriate. The bike should only sag about 35mm under your weight, regardless of what you weigh. Thats what the adjusters are for.

Dealer is full of BS. Tighten the chain yourself.

Basic steps:

Pull the cotter pin out of the rear axle bolt, and loosen the bolt so it spins freely. No need to take it off.

Now, the two adjuster nuts on the end of the swingarm need to be turned equal amounts. Get a deep socket (10mm, IIRC), stick it on there with a ratchet. Set the ratchet to tighten the adjuster nut. Hold the handle vertical (either up or down, depending on which side of the swigarm you're on), count a few clicks in the counter-clockwise direction, and return the ratchet to vertical (tightening the nut). Repeat with the same number of clicks on the other side. This should move the rear wheel back evenly.

It only takes 1/4 turn or so to make a BIG difference in chain slack. Check it every 1/4 turn or so, since its a pain to loosen the chain if you over-tighten it. After the chain slack is right, tighten the axle nut down so its snug, and re-fit the cotter pin... and you're all set.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,820 Posts
One thing that I learned a long time ago ... People who cannot admit to a mistake are very dangerous.

Admitting to mistakes is an essential part of the learning process.

If this dealer does not have any other mechanics ... Run away as hard as you can!
If they do have other mechanics, then insist that this mechanic never works on your bike again. Sometimes that is what it takes to wake up management in a dealership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I already decided that they will not see me or my bike ever again.

I will do it myself with the directions stated above (much apprechiated).

Thank you all for advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
Adjusting your chain is super easy and basic maintenence you should be able to perform. Only catch often times is having the RIGHT tools! Anybody know the right socket size for the rear axel nut? That may be the only tool you don't have. Speaking of which, I need one in metric!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
eisenfaust said:
QFT

Its like this.

The chain tightens as the swingarm moves up. There has to be a certain amount of slack so that it doesnt go TOO tight and restrict swingarm movement (bad enough) and put a ton of stress on your transmission's countershaft (really bad). Thing is, just because you weigh more, it doesnt mean that the swingarm is going to move past its maximum travel.... which is what the slack is set to account for. Furthermore, if you're a heavier rider, you need to setup your suspension's preload to compensate for that... so that your static sag is appropriate. The bike should only sag about 35mm under your weight, regardless of what you weigh. Thats what the adjusters are for.

Dealer is full of BS. Tighten the chain yourself.
.
if you consider the geometry of the swingarm, you will see that the maximum tension is when the sprocles and swingarm pivot are in direct alignment, once you sag past that point, the chain loosens again, don't matter what you weigh, when you go over a bump, the swingarm will travel past that point regarless of if you have sag set for optimum performance or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
i have never heard such a pile of horsesh!t from a mechanic. run from that mechanic and never go back. listen to the people here-- it doesn't matter what you weigh. max chain tension does not occur at full rear spring compression, so weighing more and compressing the rear spring more has nothing to do with needing a looser chain. complete BS. run!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
cyclerider105 said:
Adjusting your chain is super easy and basic maintenence you should be able to perform.  Only catch often times is having the RIGHT tools!  Anybody know the right socket size for the rear axel nut?  That may be the only tool you don't have.  Speaking of which, I need one in metric!
22mm on a '99 IIRC.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top