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Discussion Starter #1
I just got an SV650 three weeks ago (first streetbike after coming off of 10 years of dirt). And recently there has been a ticking noise inside the engine, sounds moreso from the front cylinder but thats most likely because it is exposed. Can I adjust the cam chain tension by just screwing in the screw on the tensioners? And if they dont spring back (or at least I don't think they sprung back). Should I even try to start it. I don't want to dig a deeper hole than what I think I already might have done. Thanks-Angelo
 

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the cam chain tensioners are automatic, they just have a large cog that lets the chain get pretty loose before it can advance, not to worry, ride, in a few hundred or a thousand miles it will quiet down, then after several thousand miles the noise will resurface and go away again, it's the way SV's are designed
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Alright well thats good news. Bad news is, being impatient as I am, I screwed around with the screw in the middle. How do I reset it so that it will be back to normal? Thanks-Angelo
 

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Alright well thats good news. Bad news is, being impatient as I am, I screwed around with the screw in the middle. How do I reset it so that it will be back to normal? Thanks-Angelo
not sure, somebody else will have to pipe up, have the oem tensioners been replaced with manual tensioners?
 

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Take a picture of the screw you're talking about.

You might want to search on this first next time before going and adjusting stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ya I know, it was stupid, I thought I remembered how to do it recalling when I used to work on dirtbikes a lot and did a couple motor rebuilds. As for the picture, it wouldnt really do justice cause the screw is small and inside the tensioner. Plus, I dont have a dig. camera. But basically once you take the 10mm bolt off the top of the tensioner, there is a screw inside that adjusts the tension (so I thought)
 

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I believe you are going to have to pull the CCT's. There is a procedure to pull the adjusting pin back in. You will need to make a special tool or buy the $20+ Suzuki tool. You will more than likely need new gaskets as well. Let me know if you need a copy of the tool you can make. My Haynes manual has a pic with dimensions of the tool and a nice write up. The Suzuki manual just has the write up.
 

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Are the tensioners adjusted by turning them or pushing on them? I thought they tightened by pushing.
 

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Copied from my Clymer manual. The italics are my own notes.


CAUTION: The cam chain tensioner (CCT) is a non-return type. The internal pushrod will not return to its original position once it has moved out, even the slightest amount. After the tensioner mounting bolts are loosened, the tensioner assembly must be completely removed and the pushrod reset. If the mounting bolts are loosened, do not simply retighten the mounting bolts. The pushrod has already moved out to an extended position and it will exert excessive pressure on the chain leading to costly engine damage.
  • If removing the CCT on the front cylinder, remove the carburetors.
  • If removing the CCT from the rear cylinder, perform the following to gain access to the CCT:
    • Remove the two bolts that secure the rear brake pedal assembly and move it out of the way.
    • Remove the rear brake switch. (I did not do this)
  • Remove the 5mm allen bolts securing the CCT. Remove the CCT and gasket. Be careful when removing the gasket as it tends to break apart and stick to the engine block. I would suggest purchasing two new gaskets before starting this. They are cheap.
  • Unscrew and remove the bolt and washer from the end of the tensioner.
  • The CCT is available only as a unit assembly. Do not attempt to disassemble it. Inspect the housing and rod for damage. Replace tensioner if necessary.
  • Use a narrow flat-blade screwdriver to turn the inner adjuster clockwise to retract the rod. Using your hand squeeze the rod into the tensioner body while you turn the screwdriver.
  • Hold the rod in the retracted position. If you let go the rod will pop back out.
  • Remove the screwdriver and insert the Suzuki tool (P/N 09917-62430) or the stopper plate (the one I provided you a picture of) in the grooves of the rod and housing to keep the spring tension locked.
  • Install new gasket onto the tensioner.
  • Install the tensioner and mounting bolts. Tighten to 10Nm (88 in-lb).
  • Remove stopper plate from the tensioner body to allow rod to extend.
NOTE: The tensioner should click after removing the stopper plate, which indicates the rod has extended. If not remove the tensioner and check tensioner operation.
  • Install sealing bolt and washer and tighten to 8 Nm (71 in-lb)
  • Install carburetors.
  • Install the rear brake pedal assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"Use a narrow flat-blade screwdriver to turn the inner adjuster clockwise to retract the rod. Using your hand squeeze the rod into the tensioner body while you turn the screwdriver."

That's the screw I messed with, I never took the tensioners out from the two bolts. So if I understand this correctly, I didn't really do anything bad, its when you unscrew the mount of the tensioners is when trouble begins and you have to take it all the way out.
 

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I too was wondering about the chain noise. Never really heard of any tensioner problems so I have ignored it so far per advice at the beginning of this thread. Good feedback- thanks to all.
 

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That's the screw I messed with, I never took the tensioners out from the two bolts. So if I understand this correctly, I didn't really do anything bad, its when you unscrew the mount of the tensioners is when trouble begins and you have to take it all the way out.
That could depend on which way you turned the screw. If you turned it counter-clock wise you may have adjusted the rod out which would put more pressure on the chain. Now if you just went clockwise the rod would have simply gone back to its original depth and all should be good.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
But if it could be turned counter-clockwise and put pressure on the chain, isnt it essentially a manual cam chain tensioner? And how much is too much pressure
 

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But if it could be turned counter-clockwise and put pressure on the chain, isnt it essentially a manual cam chain tensioner? And how much is too much pressure
To some degree yes. However, a manual tensioner you can adjust it both in and out and it won't be done automatically which means you have to physically go in and adjust it. Where as the automatic ones (like on the SV) will self adjust out, but never in.

As for the second question. The only true way to check if your chain is too tight is to pop the valve covers and check the chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ok, so went about 10 miles today and the ticking got louder, started to lose power, and the clutch started burning up (oil temperature Im guessing) and basically pretty sure my engine blew up. Either way, I'm gonna tear the heads off today or tommorow and figure out what went wrong. I guess trying to fix the supposedly "normal" ticking resulted in disaster. The best is the enemy of the better.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So I took off the heads and noticed that it seems the valves were hitting the piston as the grooves in the piston are well below where they should be. Any recommendations for a fix or should I just get a new engine?
 
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