Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I installed GSXR calipers on the stock forks using the adapter brackets and now it looks like both the calipers are not centered over their rotors. There is about 2x more distance to one pad than to the other. Is this normal??

Also, while installing the new pads I put that anti-squeak gunk on the back of the pads. But to fit the new pads over the rotor, I had to push the pistons all the way in, so the gunk probably got all over the inner surfaces of the calipers as well as the piston seals. Bad?

Maybe I'm just being paranoid with this stuff, but I realllly don't want to mess up my brakes. That might end badly...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,276 Posts
The gunk won't hurt the seals but I never use that stuff because eventually it could gather lots of brake dust and turn into an abrasive compound and way way down the road it could mess up the seals.

But as for the calipers, I would do a short test run, maybe a block or two and lift the front end up and see if they are still dragging, Don't those calipers mount on horizontal pins so they can slide from side to side? most calipers do, take a look, they might just be slid all the way off to one side, in that case they will center themselves once you squeeze the brake and let off.


If thats not the case you just need different spacers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
If you have a front stand, put up the font end and check the movment of the caliper. Do this before testing on the road. There's only so much displacement allowed by the caliper sliders. If it's not centered the pads won't make solid contact on both sides of the rotor and that is a HUGE problem.

Ideally the pads should be lightly rubbing against the rotor on both sides so that when the brakes are applied there is no "slack" to take up before braking friction occurs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
613 Posts
Your adapters should come with washers that are mounted between your caliper and adapter to center your caliper.

Just go out and buy some if you don't have some. I got myself a whole bunch from Harbor Freight (stainless steel) cheap.

tk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,347 Posts
Course, it doesn't actually matter in the slightest if the calipers are dead centre, it's a self-correcting system and the pressure will equalise on each side regardless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I did get the calipers centered over the rotor by using an extra washer one each side, but once I tried actually filling up the system with fluid the whole thing went south...

I got a syringe and a length of rubber tubing, connected the tubing to the nipple. Opened the reservoir cap, cracked the bleeder and tried pushing the fluid in. It doesn't want to go in, and it just starts dribbling out of the line by the bleeder. I think I set everything up correctly, what am I doing wrong? ???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,347 Posts
You need a good seal at the bleeder, the fluid'll find the easiest route so if that's out the side of the tube, it doesn't work. The hose I use gives a good seal just by itself, but since it's a complete and total ****er if the hose pops off (fluid everywhere, gah!) I also use a couple of hose clips as insurance. I think the ones I use are actually SV fuel hose clips funnily enough, from off the carbs, but anything would do the job. For my mountain bike bleeder I just use a paper clip wrapped tightly round it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
I did get the calipers centered over the rotor by using an extra washer one each side, but once I tried actually filling up the system with fluid the whole thing went south...

I got a syringe and a length of rubber tubing, connected the tubing to the nipple. Opened the reservoir cap, cracked the bleeder and tried pushing the fluid in. It doesn't want to go in, and it just starts dribbling out of the line by the bleeder. I think I set everything up correctly, what am I doing wrong? ???
you mean you trying to push fluid inside caliper through nipple?
if yes, it will never happen. nipple is to get air out, not fluid in. you pull brake lever, crack nipple open and close it right away. you keep doing it until no air bubbles coming out, just fluid.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,058 Posts
I did get the calipers centered over the rotor by using an extra washer one each side, but once I tried actually filling up the system with fluid the whole thing went south...

I got a syringe and a length of rubber tubing, connected the tubing to the nipple. Opened the reservoir cap, cracked the bleeder and tried pushing the fluid in. It doesn't want to go in, and it just starts dribbling out of the line by the bleeder. I think I set everything up correctly, what am I doing wrong? ???
try reversing that, use the syringe and tubing to suck the fluid out of the bleeder nipple making sure you keep the reasivor full. that way if/when air gets in between the rubber tube ond the bleeder nipple it's going out to the syringe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
try reversing that, use the syringe and tubing to suck the fluid out of the bleeder nipple making sure you keep the reasivor full. that way if/when air gets in between the rubber tube ond the bleeder nipple it's going out to the syringe.
This weekend I'm gonna try doxiedog's time tested approach - open both bleeders, fill reservoir and keep it topped off. Once there's good dripping on both sides you're done. I can probably speed up the process by sucking the fluid down the lines with the syringe...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,058 Posts
This weekend I'm gonna try doxiedog's time tested approach - open both bleeders, fill reservoir and keep it topped off. Once there's good dripping on both sides you're done. I can probably speed up the process by sucking the fluid down the lines with the syringe...
gravity bleeding works well too just more time consuming, you can still use some of that rubber tubing and a couple empty containers to keep from making a mess too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Course, it doesn't actually matter in the slightest if the calipers are dead centre, it's a self-correcting system and the pressure will equalise on each side regardless.
Hmmm.....
The pressure will equalize but the pistons from one side will be be protruding while braking more than the ones on the other side.Moreover,since the the pistons-and the fluid- will cover greatest distance the braking won't be ideal=the pads won't touch the rotor at the same time.This in turns means offset forces to the rotor.
It may not be the end of the world for everyday commuting but when it comes to braking things should be perfect(personal opinion of course)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,347 Posts
Yup, one side will protrude more but that doesn't actually matter, remember that they both rebound by the same amount also so each piston has the same distance to travel back to the disc each time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Yup, one side will protrude more but that doesn't actually matter, remember that they both rebound by the same amount also so each piston has the same distance to travel back to the disc each time.
Agree to that but the one side pistons will permanently protrude.
Then when it comes to braking they will exercise bigger torque to the one side of the caliper because of the bigger exposed length(works like a lever-using by best english here ,guys :) ....).
This is not good for the calipers,especially if they are not one piece(monoblock)ones:the one half will be stressed more than the other,especially under heavy braking.
There may not be issues for normal street use but I am anxious about braking balance(maybe over anxious,i admit that..)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,347 Posts
I don't think that's right tbh, there's no leverage involved. Other than at the lever of course :) But if increasing the exposed piston increases the braking force, then your brakes would become stronger as your pads and discs wear. You could also use the principle to make brakes stronger simply by increasing the amount of exposed piston. I'm reasonably sure that the force applied is unchanged by the amount of piston deployed, other than the possible effects of the larger "head" of fluid in the piston, but that difference ought to be microscopic.

I could be wrong of course!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I don't think that's right tbh, there's no leverage involved. Other than at the lever of course :) But if increasing the exposed piston increases the braking force, then your brakes would become stronger as your pads and discs wear. You could also use the principle to make brakes stronger simply by increasing the amount of exposed piston. I'm reasonably sure that the force applied is unchanged by the amount of piston deployed, other than the possible effects of the larger "head" of fluid in the piston, but that difference ought to be microscopic.

I could be wrong of course!
Andrew the forces I am refering to are not exercised on the rotors,but on the calipers and they tend to twist-and-pull apart the caliper's 2 parts.When prperly centered these forces only tend to pull apart.Sorry if I didn't explain well enough.

Yes,the force applied is unchanged by the amount of piston deployed as you say,but I mean different forces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,347 Posts
Oh, I see. Yes, I'd misread you. You're spot on then, it will definately change the forces on the caliper itself. Whether it matters or not, who knows ;) Even 2-part calipers are extremely stiff these days. But that's not to say it doesn't make some difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
make sure you don't have the calipers switched from side to side. Make sure the right caliper is on the right side fork leg and vice-versa!!!
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top