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I recently performed an operation on my bike after my shifter jammed. It was probably a terrible idea considering I have just recently gotten into the hobby and had zero experience working on motorcycles. Anyway, I figured out the issue there, and while I was in there I replaced the clutch plates, one of which had been completely ground up. However, when I put the bike back together I had a different issue. When I pull in the clutch it doesn't release the bike from gear, in other words, the bike is still locked up if it is in gear and I pull the clutch to try to roll it. I guess I don't really understand how the clutch works, when I pull in the clutch, it puts pressure on the push rod which I guess somehow separates the clutch plates...that's how I understand it. Any suggestions on what my issue could be here?

Thanks
 

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If you mean that you're concerned with how the clutch still acts like you're not pulling on the lever while trying to roll the bike in 1st gear with the engine off, this is normal because there is some drag between the clutch parts.

How does it work out on the road?
 

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leonarpr,

It is hard to tell what the problem is from what you described, but I would say that as long as you put the clutch back together correctly, i.e. alternating between clutch plate, steel, clutch, etc, and then adjusted everything as per the manuals instructions then you should be fine. You can download a manual if you don’t have one. I do not have the link; you will have to search for it.

Most motorcycles (I think everything except some Ducati's) have a wet clutch. That means the clutch plates are soaked in engine oil. When the rod gets pushed in then the plates separate and you are free to change gears or whatever, however since everything is bathed in oil the viscosity of the oil can make it seem as though the clutch is not engaged. Therefore, if the rear wheel is off the ground and you have it in first it will still spin, and like YZEtc said it can be hard to push the bike around in first even though the clutch is pulled in.

My suggestion would be to double check everything you did, at LEAST mentally go through all the steps again and make sure no alarms go off, like holy crap I forgot to do that, and then try it. Start the bike up in neutral, pull in the clutch, hold the front brake, and shift to first. If it dies and or seriously tries to lurch forward then you have a problem. If not then take it for a short ride and see if everything feels kosher.
 

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Thanks guys,

The first step would be to replace the battery, which cannot even take a charge at this point. I'm 99% sure everything went back together correctly, we had a repair manual and we were taking pictures as we took it apart. I assumed we still had a problem when pulling clutch did not release the bike from gear with the engine off, are you guys saying that this issue may go away once I get the engine running?

Paul
 

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Thanks guys,

The first step would be to replace the battery, which cannot even take a charge at this point. I'm 99% sure everything went back together correctly, we had a repair manual and we were taking pictures as we took it apart. I assumed we still had a problem when pulling clutch did not release the bike from gear with the engine off, are you guys saying that this issue may go away once I get the engine running?

Paul
Yeah I think once you get it going it will probably be ok. I guess there is nothing more that we can do right now. Let us know how it goes.
 

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you guys are missing the obvious. Search the board for "clutch mantra", and adjust your clutch cable. If your clutch was ground up before, the cable will not be adjusted right for having all new clutch plates.
 
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