Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok road race guys tell me what happened here.

Ok so I'm going home today and I take the Outer Drive exit off of 96 just for "the long way home" and I know the road is a bit curvy.  2 lanes each direction.  After getting on this road after the exit is a hard right (90 degree) turn.    I went through, in the right lane, at a speed somewhere between responsible and suicidal.   ;D  Well the curve was typical Detroit quality.  Kinda like the Moon but rougher.  When I hit the bumps the bike went wide on me.  I was lucky because the left lane was free and clear.  I wonder did I do something to make it go wide, is it a set-up problem, or just normal for a bike to do that in a extremely bumpy turn?


Hmmmmmm

   
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
i'm no racer but i'll give this a shot.

so you already know what happened around that turn on your bike. yes, a bike with a better suspension setup would have been able to absorb road imperfections better than our your current setup. (i'm assuming you are stock. and if not it doesn't really matter.) but there is only so much that any suspension can do to make your ride smoother.

i've never been to detroit, but have heard many horror stories about road quality. or lack thereof.

now you say that the road was so rough that it made you run wide. this is a natural occurrence unfortunately. i have ridden on many west virginia backroads, and last year i was on a group ride where i experienced the same thing. it was on a near hairpin turn that i was taking a little quickly. i leaned over into the turn and would have been perfectly fine but i didn't notice that in the middle of the turn the pavement basically had ripples in it. like small ripples on top of water. so i'm leaned over and the bike is basically seesawing back and forth on the ripples because the ripples don't hit both tires at the same time and i start running wider in the turn. fortunately i made it through the turn ok, but i needed to be pried off of my seat later.

basically what was going on is that when you set up for a normal turn, you get your suspension loaded how you want and then it basically stays like that until you start rolling on the throttle and your front end gets lighter. in a bumpy turn like you describe, your suspension is being unsttled so much that it cannot make the turn on the line you chose. when your front tire hits one of those bumps the forks are compressed. and then when you come off of that bump the forks rebound and your front is momentarily lightened. now for your forks to get recompressed the weight needs to come back down and in that small span of time you have just gone a fraction wide.

now imagine both tires doing that at eneven rates at the same time around a really bumpy turn and you have just run really wide.

so like i said to begin with, yes a better suspension would have helped some. but there is only so much that they can do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Excellent info Schultzboy. I would also add that it is important to anticipate that the road may be bumpy and leave yourself a margin for error. I am from the Detroit area and that stretch of Outer Drive is a nice urban road but is definitely not smooth. Also, much of it is in a park and may be patrolled by the Detroit Police so beware. Thanks, Mike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Po Po's

Yes! I get real nervous going through there.  The limit is 25 but it's so enjoyable to cruise through doing 50-ish!   Dodging crackheads and hoes uses up my "attention credit card"!  What Sport!  :p   

Thanks for the info.  It makes sense after reading that explanation. 

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
What probably happend is the bumps upset you and you slightly straightened up and ran wide. Bumps shouldn't cause the bike itself to run wide. The bike will go where you point it.

I race on a pretty bumpy track and we spend a lot of time avoiding the bumps but they don't cause the bike itself to run wide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
bumps = get nervous = tighten up arms = stand bike up = lose track of turning head and looking thru corner = the reason lots of people crash.

IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well my first reaction after it happened was that I was the cause. So your theories about rider mistakes are probably correct.

RD
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
947 Posts
Don't you think if the bumps were enough to make the tires bounce off the surface of the road it would run wide no matter what the rider does?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
Marc said:
Don't you think if the bumps were enough to make the tires bounce off the surface of the road it would run wide no matter what the rider does?

Yes. And the bumps make it all the more difficult for the rider convince himself to apply throttle and lean in harder to recover the original line or turn end point...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,379 Posts
RobDog said:
Ok road race guys tell me what happened here.

Ok so I'm going home today and I take the Outer Drive exit off of 96 just for "the long way home" and I know the road is a bit curvy.  2 lanes each direction.  After getting on this road after the exit is a hard right (90 degree) turn.    I went through, in the right lane, at a speed somewhere between responsible and suicidal.   ;D  Well the curve was typical Detroit quality.  Kinda like the Moon but rougher.  When I hit the bumps the bike went wide on me.  I was lucky because the left lane was free and clear.  I wonder did I do something to make it go wide, is it a set-up problem, or just normal for a bike to do that in a extremely bumpy turn?


Hmmmmmm

   
If you've got the stock fork springs in there the suspension is bottoming and the front wheel is not staying on the pavement. Better front suspension will help a lot.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top