Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading the forum for months, and then had my first post to help me decide between N and S. I got an 03 S model and I'm going to the process to make it a bit more track worthy with the intention of having track days and education on it (no racing). Based on budget, parts availability and researching on the forum I decided on the following mods:

  • /70 front tire
  • EBC lines and HH pads (front only)
  • Calliper rebuild
  • Chinese rearsets
  • K-Tech 9.0N springs (185lbs with gear)
  • Motul 15W oil
  • YSS shock (MZ456-330TRL-44)
  • Engine covers
  • Stock clip-ons

So I have the following questions regarding setup and installation:

1. The springs are 12mm shorter than stock. My understanding is that I need new spacers. What are accepted materials for that? Polypropylene water pipe ok?
2. What are recommended front suspension settings for track - air gap in forks, how far to protrude forks from the top, sag, front/rear height balance
3. Can't decide if I want to run fairings or not... I'm leaning towards removing them in order to reduce damage in a crash and reduce weight. Opinions?
4. If I run naked what are my options to get rid of the hideous dash that's left hanging? I can get Vapor for RPM, but I don't want to run without oil and temp warning lights. Is it possible to wire into the original harness and have warning lights?
5. Is racing subframe, tail and seat worth it for my application? Don't care about cool looks (for now), just aiming for best value for money in terms of ergonomics and performance.
6. Anything else I'm missing?

Thanks in advance for your input!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
Looks like you have the important stuff (suspension and brakes) mostly handled.
On the spacer, you can use the water pipe, in the USA it's called PVC. It comes in two wall thicknesses (schedule 20 and schedule 40) get the thicker of the two. Cut the spacer so that it ends up recessed 20mm down into the tube with the fork fully extended. Do NOT make the total spring/spacer length the same as stock.
When you screw the fork caps on and then set the adjusters in the middle you'll have 15mm of static preload and your sag should be fine. 30-35mm total sag is what you're looking for. Set the oil level/air gap at 125mm.
The height of the fork tubes in the triple clamps is going to depend on the shock length. Ideally you would have it around 340mm. Does your YSS go that long? I talked to them the other day, at least on the first gen shocks the range of adjustment is only +-5mm. A stock second gen shock is 330mm, so +5 only gets you to 335mm. What's the spring rate on the shock?
Removing them makes sense if this is a dedicated track bike. I wouldn't worry about the oil and temp lights, my race bikes rarely had them.
I wouldn't do the subframe just yet, see how the stock seating position works for you first.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Soulspinner

· Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Really appreciate that you took the time to address all my questions!
The shock is only +-5mm, so 335 is max. Spring rate is 12.2kg/mm (685lbs/in).
Isn’t it too dangerous to get for example a water leak unnoticed without a temp and oil lights?
Thanks again, really helpful!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
My experience on the track is that while you're riding around, you'll never look at the gauges.

If you spring a fluid leak that doesn't somehow get on your rear tire and cause you to crash anyway, the marshals should let you know via flags.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
Really appreciate that you took the time to address all my questions!
The shock is only +-5mm, so 335 is max. Spring rate is 12.2kg/mm (685lbs/in).
Isn’t it too dangerous to get for example a water leak unnoticed without a temp and oil lights?
Thanks again, really helpful!
Are sure on that spring rate? 685 is a reasonable rate for a first gen, but way too stiff on a second gen unless you weigh over 300lbs.
Judging from the fork rate you got I’d have thought you weighed less than 200lbs. Shock spring should be in the 480-500 range if that’s true.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
Regarding how far to stick your forks through the tope yoke: You cant go more than 10mm or the fork seals will be contacting the bottom of the bottom yoke at full compression. Not that you want to be reaching full compression, but it can happen! I run mine with 8mm of chrome showing above the top yoke.

If your going to be racing at fast tracks and are looking for good results then I would definitely fit a fairing for aerodynamics. But if your just out there for $hits and giggles then dont worry about it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My local track is very tight and bumpy with main straight only 0.36 mile with entry speed around 45mph. The other one that is somewhat close is in Greece and is faster and has more flow but straight is still only 0.41mile.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
You are correct, I got the product code wrong. The shock spring rate is 485 and goes to 340mm in length (+-10мм adjustment)
Ok, you're all set set then. :) I'd start with the shock at 338mm, 8mm of fork tube showing above the top of the triple and see how that is.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
My local track is very tight and bumpy with main straight only 0.36 mile with entry speed around 45mph. The other one that is somewhat close is in Greece and is faster and has more flow but straight is still only 0.41mile.
So cool to see someone from that area. My daughter is just over the border in Kamenitsa for a few months.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok, you're all set set then. :) I'd start with the shock at 338mm, 8mm of fork tube showing above the top of the triple and see how that is.
Just to confirm - this is with /70 tire accounted for, correct?
And 30-35mm sag target is both for front and rear?
So cool to see someone from that area. My daughter is just over the border in Kamenitsa for a few months.
That’s really cool, hope she likes it here and enjoys her stay!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
Rich, would you not keep the rear shock sag figures a bit tighter for track work? Personally I run 25mm - 28mm rider sag at the rear. Helps keep a bit of ‘nose down’ attitude to sharpen up the steering geometry a bit.
Yeah, I typically ran closer to 30mm on the rear, and a few mm more up front. But that's way down in the weeds for a guy just starting out with track days. In the beginning, my general advice it to get the spring/geometry/suspension stuff in the ballpark and then go ride and have fun. As someone gets faster then they'll have a better idea of what works for them, and can adjust accordingly.

Also, I try to keep from using suspension settings to adjust geometry. If I need the nose more down, then I'll either change fork position or shock length to achieve that rather than sag. Only if I'm constrained in some way will I resort to compromised suspension settings.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I appreciate all the responses and helping me in those first steps to make the bike track worthy! I signed up for a track focused riding course in the beginning of April. I hope to be able to complete the fork and caliper rebuild and put everything back together soon, so I can get some seat time and get used to the bike as it is different in many ways to the others I have.
Something else is bothering me and it might be a silly question, but I’ll ask anyway – since starting my research on the SV as a track bike I came across many posts and videos of proud SV650 owners bragging about beating 600 guys under braking and in the corners and only being in disadvantage on long straights. Is there anything special about the SV that allows it to do that, or it’s just the case of a more skilled rider on the SV or a bike with thousands of dollars of upgraded suspension and brakes and ending up costing more compared to a bone stock 600?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
I wouldn't class the SV as a good bike for out braking 600's on. The 600's have superior brakes compared to the more budget spec SV brakes. It really depends whose doing the pulling on the lever more than what the bike is.
Ditto the cornering. There's so much crap on the internet, I wouldn't take too much notice of that stuff and definitely dont take it as gospel.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
I appreciate all the responses and helping me in those first steps to make the bike track worthy! I signed up for a track focused riding course in the beginning of April. I hope to be able to complete the fork and caliper rebuild and put everything back together soon, so I can get some seat time and get used to the bike as it is different in many ways to the others I have.
Something else is bothering me and it might be a silly question, but I’ll ask anyway – since starting my research on the SV as a track bike I came across many posts and videos of proud SV650 owners bragging about beating 600 guys under braking and in the corners and only being in disadvantage on long straights. Is there anything special about the SV that allows it to do that, or it’s just the case of a more skilled rider on the SV or a bike with thousands of dollars of upgraded suspension and brakes and ending up costing more compared to a bone stock 600?
Yes and no. It's mostly rider skill. Especially at track days, there's a much bigger difference in lap times between a slow rider and a fast rider than there is between a slow bike and a fast bike.

But, one thing that a well set up SV does have is that it's an easy bike to ride. So it make it easier for a rider to approach their personal limits without the bike getting in the way.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Soulspinner

· Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
I ride on the street with guys mostly on 1000+cc superbikes. We ride "the Pace" style so my power disadvantage almost never shows. When riding with them I always thought of myself as a corner speed/momentum style rider vs the point and shoot style that big bikes tend towards. It isn't that they aren't capable of higher corner speeds, rather they are working with their bike to maximize their overall speed. It was definitely fun to reel them in on corner entry, though.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
984 Posts
It's mostly the rider, HP and road/track lay out plays a roll.
I've seen countless times dudes on stock ninja 400's spank riders on larger displacement bikes.
Looooog straights say goodbye to your friends on 600's
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top