Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I won a pair of Kobe' gloves at the rally a few months back and just can't seem to get them to break in. They fit perfect, look nice, and the kangaroo hide (I think) palm is soft and supple. But I feel like some priss at a cocktail party riding around in them because the double layer riveted area around the pinky is so friggin stiff I end up with hand cramps trying to keep my hands wrapped around the bars.
I'm leery of soaking them, I don't want to rust the rivets or hose the rest of the glove. will mink oil or something else soften it, or do I just need to deal with it until they get enough use that the leather starts softening?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,049 Posts
This may sound odd, but I have a softball glove that I bought at the beginning of the season this year. It has Kangarro hide in the pocket. It was REALLY stiff when I bought it, but a lot of glove oil loosened it up. As a matter of fact I was able to use it regularly about 3/4 of the way into the season.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
what is this glove oil of which you speak??? Something a sporting goods place would have?

No I don't get out much, wife won't let me shop because I swear at the rednecks and little old ladies having reunions in the aisle I'm trying to get down
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,820 Posts
Glove oil is a variation of linseed oil called neatsfoot oil.

I used to buy it by the gallon when I used to make holsters.
Go to a tack shop where they sell saddles and bridles, all you need is about 8 oz and that should last you a couple of years.

Don't be afraid of getting leather wet, it is how it is dried that hurts it.

I dry my wet leathers in the cellar with a dehumidifyer set on low speel nearby.
It dries without heat and cracking, and dries fast enough that mildew or other bacteria does not set in.
That is what really hurts leather.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
Currently said:
I dry my wet leathers in the cellar with a dehumidifyer set on low speel nearby.
It dries without heat and cracking, and dries fast enough that mildew or other bacteria does not set in.
That is what really hurts leather.
So thats why my leather stinks...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,820 Posts
I will hold back on that comment ;D :D ;D

Seriously, if you have a dehumidifier it is the best way to slowly dry leathers.
Do not expose to sunlight or heat, either will cause leather to crack.

I like running dehumidifiers in the summer as it makes a house more comfortable and easier to cool.
My wife has a mildew allergy so that also keeps mildew in check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
You can get glove oil at any sporting goods store that sells baseball gloves, hell, you can get it at wal-mart, too. Get em oiled up pretty heavy and wear the gloves around the house, that should do the trick.

Or for kicks you could do a variation of what we do with baseball gloves, where you put a ball in the pocket, soak the glove up with oil and put it under your mattress, but instead you could maybe sit on a tricycle holding the bars while watching tv with the gloves on and oiled up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Newdriver said:
Just wear em and ride more!

-josh
;D I'm tryin' Since the overnight temp has been dropping the last few weeks, I've been wearing them for my morning commute. Much warmer then the J.R. Pheonix I usually wear. They're a bit warm for the 80 degree rushhour commute home though.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top