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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up a used 1st gen 650 with 16K miles. The bike is very clean and everything works good except the front brakes. Basically, it takes quite a bit of pressure on the lever to get a good bite/stopping power. I would say 1 or 2 finger braking is not possible on this bike. Braking is much weaker than on by stock Suzuki Bandit 1200.

The lever is very firm, so I believe there is no air in the lines. Fluid in there is brand new. The rotors seem good as they are smooth (not grooved). The pads are the stock original ones but they still have room to go, according to the wear grooves on the pads. The forks have 20 wt oil in them, so I don't know if that affects any thing. When I crank down hard on the lever, I get a barely noticeable rough spot in the last 1 mm travel on the lever. Also, not sure if that has anything to do with my problem but at that point the brakes would be fully locked on my Suzuki Bandit.

I guess that a set of new brake pads would be a good place to start. Any other suggestions????

Dave
 

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I would start with new pads as well. As you said, if you crank down on the lever, you should be able to lock up the front wheel.
 

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New pads (Carbone-Lorraine SBK3's are my current favorite), stainless steel/kevlar brake lines, and new (not just replaced) brake fluid freshly bled after installation of the lines should provide a very solid, predictable level of performance.




The 20 wt oil in the forks? Should not be a factor in braking performance (as a result of lessened front end loading or weight transfer) unless the fork springs are grossly too stiff for rider weight.. This one time, no not at band camp ;), I tried 5w-30 motor oil in my forks just for giggles. The result was anything but funny: no fork action = no weight transfer = greatly reduced front braking = dirty shorts :eek:...



HTH
 

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Yea you are probably pushing the calipers to there max, Im guessing that it had new fluid in it when you got it, well the reason for that is likely because it was low, due to the pistons being fully extended and all the fluid being in the caliper, had this problem on my old GS. When you push the pistons back in be sure not to run fluid all over everything. I found that if you stick a little bit of a paper towl in the resivour at a time and soak a little fluid up and then push and then soak fluid up as needed with new paper towls you can get away with out making a mess and being able to easily get rid of that little amount of fluid.
 

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That's also a problem when you get glazed brake pads. Had it happen in several cars and on my SV. Why is glazed a problem? Well, there's no friction for the pads to grab the rotors. Just my :2cents
 

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Or slightly warped rotors, keeps the pistons pushed away from the rotor so when you apply the brakes it needs more action to do the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions guys. I guess I will start with the pads and take it from there.

Thanks!

Dave
 

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Take no chances with brakes. Remove the calipers and make sure the pistons are floating freely. If the pistons are not moving well, then rebuild the calipers. I've seen hoses that look good on the outside but were swollen virtually shut on the inside. Dirty fluid (not enough clean bleed maintenance) will do that.

Make sure the master is working well and isn't corroded internally.

Then deglaze the pads and the rotors. Reassemble carefully. You can install new pads, but I wouldn't unless the existing pads are worn out.

Lastly, bleed the calipers until you are getting nothing but clean fluid.

Rear brakes, though important, are not all that critical, especially with the SV's engine braking potential. Front brakes are a life and death issue.
 

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andyauger said:
Take no chances with brakes. Remove the calipers and make sure the pistons are floating freely. If the pistons are not moving well, then rebuild the calipers. I've seen hoses that look good on the outside but were swollen virtually shut on the inside. Dirty fluid (not enough clean bleed maintenance) will do that.

Make sure the master is working well and isn't corroded internally.

Then deglaze the pads and the rotors. Reassemble carefully. You can install new pads, but I wouldn't unless the existing pads are worn out.

Lastly, bleed the calipers until you are getting nothing but clean fluid.

Rear brakes, though important, are not all that critical, especially with the SV's engine braking potential. Front brakes are a life and death issue.
I agree with Andy--If your bike has been stored out side( I have had this happen with older machines in Humid Environs--Alabama) the caliper , master cylinder, and fluid are like a sponge to humidity. This leads to corrosion which leads to friction/sticksion in the calipers. Take them apart and check everything. Deglazing is tough, but you can do with sand paper, and alot of "elbow grease"
 
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