Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so... my rear brake pads were below the 2mm mark. I ordered new ones: EBC FA-496HH. I've replaced pads on many vehicles & bikes many times, but never on this bike before.

  • Unscrewed the pin holding in the pads (5mm)
  • Took the caliper off (annoyed by the exhaust system)
  • Removed old pads
  • Sil-Glyde on the floating pins
  • Uncapped the rear brake reservoir
  • Pushed the cylinder back in
  • Anti-seize on the threads of the pin that goes through the pad holes
  • Installed new pads
  • Bolted caliper back to bike (12mm & 14mm floating bolts)
  • Pressed rear brake pedal several times until contact was made
  • Rode the bike around... and I smell brakes

The brake rotor and caliper get very hot. When I put the bike up on a rear stand the rear wheel spins, but I can hear the rubbing. I bled the rear brakes just to make sure there wasn't a problem (i've also bled brakes a lot). No air bubbles. I have a firm pedal too.

Are the EBC pads too thick compared to stock? I don't get it. Help me please! :(


Edit: Oh yah... I've got enough dot 4 brake fluid to let the rear brakes bleed dry and start again if someone thinks i need to take the caliper apart. I would seriously rather not though as it's time consuming. & I've got enough grease and sil-glyde to lube an 18 wheeler. Maybe I need to play with the pedal adjuster bolts? I hate their location though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Is it a HH pads? They have tendency to drag from my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My pads look exactly like this:
http://www.motorcycletire.com/merch...de=motorcycle-ebc-brake-pads&Store_Code=tires


They fit and all the groves line up and everything. I had no problem getting the pads back on the rotor. But they do drag. And boy do they drag a lot. Not enough to warp my rotor by the looks of it, but enough to take my mpg from 64mpg to 54mpg & enough to definitively get over 200F maybe more.

I just don't understand. I feel like I did something wrong, but I've looked at tons of tutorials. I've followed all the steps I've done before. I'm thinking about taking my friend's pads just for this weekend. It is really pissing me off.

Edit: I've put the caliper on/off twice. I'm going to do it again. Maybe i'll get a miraculous difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Unfortunetly if its the same thing as cars and it is a sticking caliper then you would have to replace the caliper. Assuming that bike calipers work the same as car calipers, the best way to tell if it is a caliper issue, your old inside pad that touches the piston would be more worn than the outside pad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,702 Posts
Your bike has 13k and you're replacing rear pads? :dontknow: Either you use the rear WAY too much, or there was something screwed up to begin with.


No clue if it's related to your problem, but I don't like to force fluid back thru the master. I prefer to crack the bleeder and relieve pressure there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Well I just changed my rear brake pads with the same model of EBC pads. I've had the oem ones on for 13500km thats 8388 miltes. Is it normal that the pads wear unevenly? My pads had quite a difference in wear. Check the pictures below.



With the EBCs on I could barely fit them. It's as if they are always in contact with the rotor as it is now. As if you would apply a little bit of brake always. I haven't ridden the bike yet. But would this generate a lot of heat, unnecessary wear on the rotor and lower my mpg? Is this what you guys refer to when using the term "drag"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
Not sure with the stock SV front brakes but on a GSXR front end my pads wear uneven and I was told that's normal.
I would think the way the SV brakes work the pads would wear even more uneven.

When I first got my first SV I went through a set of rear pads in no time because I was riding the brake without knowing it,
mechanic said that this was not unheard of.
I my big feet played a role in that, I think.

But the OP said the pads are dragging, could it be that the pads are just to thick?
Would be interesting to known how thick stock SV pads are.

kodde, I would just do a very short test ride to see how hot the get.
Also, most of the time there is a little drag but not enough to make them hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Your bike has 13k and you're replacing rear pads? :dontknow: Either you use the rear WAY too much, or there was something screwed up to begin with.
Nope to both of those. I use both brakes when I brake. I'm not one of those riders going 40k on rear pads by only using front brake.

& nah I don't ride the rear brake. I keep my balls on the peg. I do notice it a lot with both two footed car drivers & new riders.


Anyways, I found 3 problems last night. 1) I didn't clean the piston before pushing it back in. So I pushed it out again and got out the good old tooth brush and brake cleaner. That seemed to make a lot of difference.
2) The other thing I did... was really really grease those floating pins. I pushed the metal bushings out of the rubber and just went to town. Sadly, when I greased them before.... somehow they went dry pretty fast. I guess I leaned toward too little grease. Ppl say you only need a little grease. But idk everything's different. Maybe mine weren't greased right with the first set of pads. All I know is now that I greased it good, I can literally take the caliper on the bike and move it back and forth. Which is awesome.
Oh and 3rd... even though I bled the brakes last time and checked the reservoir levels and everything... idk. Maybe the rear stand threw me off. But the master cylinder for the rear brakes was over the 'upper' level. So I pulled some out with a syringe.

So I made 3 pretty innocent mistakes. heh. Sorry for the scare regarding the pads everyone. They Work.

I'd watch this guy for reference. He seems to know what he is doing.


So my pads barely rub now. My MPG's are back & My pedal is still super firm. :)
I'm happy I got it right, because sometimes this bike pisses me off with it's weirdness.... like sideport calipers, or no suspension dampening, etc.

So yah the EBC pads work perfect. I never had a problem getting them on the rotor even initially. My model # = EBC FA-496HH.

Edit: oh about the uneven wearing.... I have no idea. Both of my pads were less than 2mm. They look dead even to me. If I were you, I'd just go through all the steps and make sure everything is greased and the pistons are clean and free of brake dust. At $30-$40 for a set of pads you don't really want to be changing them because only 1 wore down.

edit2: oh just to give you another idea of my rear brake pad mileage.... The front brake pads were changed out at 6,500miles. So maybe I do get carried away with the brakes. One a month or so I will do a panic stop from 120mph+ just for fun. & I practice the MSF box pretty frequently along with u-turns. And I DO typically ride the rear brake for slow stuff like that. But yah. My fronts got 1/2 the mileage. & I'm not a born dirt bike rider, so I don't cover the front brake almost ever. I guess you could say I abuse my bike a little. But honestly, riding it 200miles at a time and rarely cold starting it.... I'd say I don't abuse it - I just use it 100%. & my current front brake pads (HH rated) still have 3/4 life.... so idk. It could also be the stock pads on my particular bike just really really sucked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Well I tried riding my bike today, first time since changing the pads. I started with bedding-in the pads as described in several articles on the web. After this the rotor was extremely hot. But then again, I had been braking a lot the last few minutes of riding due to the bedding-in process.

I left the bike and sit for a while to have the rotors cool of. I then went for a regular 5 minutes ride to the gym in town. Using both front and rear brakes when breaking as I always do. When parking the bike I felt the rotor at the back wheel and it was only mildly warm. The front wheel rotor was warmer. So no excessive heat it seems. Then again this was only a 5 minute ride.

I have to say that I do feel a better braking force in general when riding now. Or at least I think do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yah that is about how it happened to me. Mine was just worse because the caliper couldn't float properly & the piston probably couldn't go back in smoothly.

You wore them in with light brake pressure right? That's how I did it. There is definitely more initial bite with the HH pads, which is good, I'd say.

Glad it worked out for you too! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
LifeIsGood169> Well fairly light. I never engaged the ABS or anything. Not like panic braking.

I'm contemplating on cleaning the calipers properly and going for new brake fluids like you did. Maybe I'll do it next weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
By the way, when checking the brake fluid level. Should you do this with the side stand or with the bike straightened?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
By the way, when checking the brake fluid level. Should you do this with the side stand or with the bike straightened?
Vertical like the oil level. Handle bars straight too. Yah it can be a pain in the ass if you only have a rear stand and no front stand - like me. :p

Also... changing the brake fluid can be a pain in the ass if it's your first time doing it ever. I've done it on mountain bikes a ton of times and on in my truck.

On the SFV I had problems with the treads leaking so I bled the brakes dry and put teflon tape (like they put on certain plumbing connections) around the threads. 3 turns the reverse direction that the screw turns in. But it's a pain in the but to fill the system back up and get a solid lever. I went through a whole 32oz can minus 4oz.

So If i was going to recommend it to a 1st timer...
  • don't worry so much about all the air bubbles you see... They are air bubbles are usually coming from air going through the threads and then immediately out... so it's not like they are all in your lines.
  • Also you don't need to crack the bleeder screw a lot... only a little & don't torque it tight really hard... they are easy to strip - i think it's like 5-8ft/lbs or less
  • I got a small vacuum pump which helped, but I really needed a standard oral syringe (drug store) and a length of 1/4" or 5/16" tube to do a little reverse brake bleeding. Just doing a little of that gave me back my super firm lever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
I just replaced my rear pads with EBC pads. The pads were too close together to fit the rotor so I jammed a screwdriver between them and pried them apart until the rotor fit. Now they work fine and don't rub. You shouldn't need to open the master cylinder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I just replaced my rear pads with EBC pads. The pads were too close together to fit the rotor so I jammed a screwdriver between them and pried them apart until the rotor fit. Now they work fine and don't rub. You shouldn't need to open the master cylinder.
If you bled your brakes like me when the pads had 1/4 life, and always kept the fluid in between the lower and upper limit. When you push the cylinder back in you'd have fluid above the upper level. I had get that extra fluid out of there. You could also undo the bleeder valve, but I didn't want to mess with brake bleeding and pad change at the same time, because I know from my mountain bike getting brake fluid on the pads makes them squeal and the only way to stop it is to replace the pads again. You might not have to remove the reservoir cap, but it is still important to check the fluid level when replacing pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
So your saying that perhaps loosing a bit of fluid could be the solution to ease on the rubbing, i.e. not having the piston out as much?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top