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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, I'd like to mention that I bought this bike used, and it's been down on both sides. It rode almost straight with a slight left drifting with hands off the bars, but it was too insignificant to care. Then it was time to replace my original tires. I replaced the back tire (balanced too) first and made sure the alignment marks were the same. Then I rode the bike, and the alignment seemed the same.

A few weeks later, I finally had time to change the front tire. I used a wheel stand that was not intended for uneven forks like our SVs, and even after I found out forks were uneven, I used the stand anyway. I had to muscle the stand and bike to get the wheel axle to slide in right. After I balanced and mounted the front tire, the bike drifts significantly to the left with my hands off the bars.

With hands on bars, there is little-to-none resistance, but as soon as my hands are off, the bike runs to the left quite hard. It's most likely an alignment problem, but what should I check first? Do you think the front tire change or the use of the front wheel stand might have something to do with it?
 

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Thanks for the reply.
Watched the video.. bouncing the forks is sometime I didn't do. Will I need to lift up the front wheel? I will check the rear wheel alignment tonight.
no, not really.
 

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I can not use the marks the align my wheels.. no idea why the marks left and right do not line up but they don't.. I used the string method have been very happy with the results.

 

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:) thanks jeff for pulling up a topic of mine haha, the response on that helped me a lot with this issue.

@ OP -

First :
-make sure the tire is inflated properly

-make sure it's seated all the way around the wheel properly ( this would probably cause a lot more than alignment problems but who knows)

-this one is kinda silly but, make sure the forks are level in the triple tree clamps- if one is "higher" even by a few millimeters than another you will get a weird alignment out of it.

-make sure your back wheel is right- that can cause trouble too-, as render said you can use string- or using the marks in the back.



My bike is used as well and it had been down- I rode it for 2 years without any imbalances or anything strange... first time i took that front wheel off and put it back on (no tire change keep in mind, just a fork oil swap and RICCOR addition) I noticed a veer to the left.

As it turns out one of my forks was bent... and only by about 2 mm, the *slightest* tweak meant I had to keep 5+ lbs of pressure on the right bar just to ride straight... sooooper annoying.

I think when it was together (and after the accident) it sat in the right spot- the tweak was "forced" into a straight position- but once we loosened it nothing was going to go back as it was.

Take a straight edge and slide it around the inner fork tube- see if you find any high or low spots... Then if (if you do) - either replace the fork (OR imo this is better cause its way cheaper) - get a friend with a big press - the one we used was 20 Tons- buffer the sucker with some blocks of wood, and press the high spot back into shape :).

My bike's been riding straight and smooth for months now :)
 
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