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I've got a bit over 300 miles on the new pads with what I tried as best to do with easy braking each time I slowed down/stopped. I reused existing rotors and was told by my parts guy that I need allow the pads 300-400 miles to get the wear pattern set that the rotors have. After about 300 miles perform the bedding process, get up to 70 mph, brake hard till near stop, accelerate to 70 and continue process about 10 times.

Can anyone confirm that this sounds legit? I was researching to refresh my mind on the bed in process when of course I came across many different opinions on how to bed new pads.
 

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Sounds about right to me. I'm almost ready to do that process with mine (around 280 miles).

The reason for the wait is so the pad surface can mate to the existing rotor surface. If you took your calipers off and checked the pad surface, you'd see dull spots where you hadn't worn the pads to the rotors enough (sort of like low spots while sanding bodywork). I did this 2 weekends ago while I was changing front springs and oil.

Once they match up nicely, you have to basically overheat the pads to induce a chemical change so they stop better. Or something like that. I don't know the chemistry involved, but I trust it.

Also, that's what EBC's website says to do, so that's something. :)
 

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Can anyone confirm that this sounds legit?
Yes, that is pretty much what everyone does to fully bed in the rotors and pads. Bike brakes are a bit easier to bed IMHO than car/truck versions because of the minimal mass involved allows the bedding temperatures to be reached easily with just a few applications vs the 6-10 needed to cook the heavy iron rotors on a car.

To expound for those not understanding what is happening: You are dealing with two similar but different phenomenon when braking....and this is determined by the rotor temperature. At low temps, friction is your mechanism and easily understood as the pads rubbing on the rotor convert kinetic energy (forward velocity) into heat.

Once past the mid 300's F (roughly, depends on compound) the ability of pure friction to work diminishes and adhesion takes over. This is where the pad literally begins to stick to a layer of itself that was deposited on the rotor face. This mechanism works at least until the rotor is glowing on most brake systems so you'll not outride it.:)

I'm thinking the rotors will be hot enough to transfer pad material after just a stop or two from highish speed. My normal is getting up to 100 or so and bringing it down hard to 20 a couple of times. This should easily do it and the second stop is using its' pressure to push the pad into the rotor hard enough to coat it. No need for 10 stops here at all.

Biggest thing to remember is DO NOT STOP when the brakes are hot!!! Ride around gently and allow them to cool back down to ambient before stopping and letting them sit. If you stop with very hot rotors the bedding process continues and an abnormally thick layer of pad will be deposited in just that one spot where the rotor rests under the pad. This will be 'stickier' than the rest of the rotor when you get it hot the next time and can cause a shake or judder. Many attribute this to 'warpage' but it is not.....just a friction differential causing more and less braking per revolution. Good to try to avoid that happening!;)
 

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Great read thanks for that. Especially since I'll be putting new pads on in about a week.

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