Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,
I’m in the works of putting my bike together from an engine swap... I had an issue with the bike starting. I’ve tried two different batteries and it seems like they both don’t have enough juice to start the bike... when I jump the bike with a car battery it’s quick to start up but when I use a battery tender and charge the battery to full then remove it, it doesn’t want to start... it cranks like the batteries dead. I’m confused any ideas?
Thanks!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,121 Posts
..... when I jump the bike with a car battery it’s quick to start up but when I use a battery tender and charge the battery to full then remove it, it doesn’t want to start... it cranks like the batteries dead.
Make sure the battery terminals are clean and tight but most likely both your batteries are toast, will not hold charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
It does seem that your battery is defective. Test it with a voltmeter to see if it is holding charge (charge it, leave it an hour then test the voltage between the terminals) if it is less than 12.6v then the battery isn’t holding charge and you need a new one.

Batteries aren’t expensive, buy a £20 lead acid one, at least until you get it sorted (actually I find that cheap batteries last for years - but there will be plenty of naysayers that tell me I’m wrong).

Good fortune,

Alsn


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,121 Posts
A no-load voltage test will reveal the state of charge of a healthy battery and will tell if one or more cells are bad but will not tell if a batter is good or not. A load test is required.

A simple load test is leave the headlight on for 5 min continuously while monitoring voltage at the battery terminals. Should be 12.0v or above, the higher the better, the entire time. If slightly below 12.0v then the battery is weak, if much lower than 12.0 the battery is bad.

A better load test is measure battery voltage while the starter motor is cranking. This is what the battery is required to do worst case (65 amps) so is an excellent real world test. A healthy battery will drop near 10v. Less than 9.5v means the battery needs to be charged or has failed.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top