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Mileage? Seasons ridden? Off-seasons ridden? Crashes? What's the general consensus?
 

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When does one become an adult? Answer that question and you'll have a better idea. :)

Josh
 

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i would have to say that this isnt the place to ask if your still a noob.  do you feel comfortable riding all the time? can you keep your self out of most close calls?  its really only your judgement in deciding and milage and time riding doesnt make it.  Just riding at your own pace is the first step out of being a noob
 

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I didn't cosider myself a noob anymore, when I stopped wondering if I was a noob. Just keep riding and learning.
 

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This is one of the rare times when it doesn't matter what you think, it matters what other people think. You could have over 100k miles and be a noob in a group of adventure tourers that have that knind of milage on a couple of their bikes. You could do 10 track days a year and be a noob when the AMA rolls through town. You could be an old salt with 10k miles if you do all you own maintaince and hone your skills on every ride

No aren't a noob when the people around you stop calling you one and you become one again if someone with more experience and skill calls you one. That is just sorta how it goes.
 

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Four stages of "ability"..or whatever you want to call it.

Unconsciencely incompetent
Consciencely incompetent
Consciencely competent
Unconsciencely competent.

Where do you fit as you ride? Do you have to think about what you are going to do, or does it just happem while you are riding?
 

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Unconsciencely incompetent
Consciencely incompetent
Consciencely competent
Unconsciously competent.
Wills, are you Donald Runsfeld in R/L? While the spelling sucks, the epistemology of your analysis is unimpeachable.

Is is possible Rasberry was referring to the member status (usually) arbitrarily shown by the SVRider board software?
 

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I'll say it this way.

You get the bike and drop it, ride for 8 months and get comfortable, start making fun of the way other people ride, once you think you've got it all figured out then you have a highspeed crash 18 months later, are able to get back on and eventually realize that we all have our own way and reason for riding. Then you're not a noob.

Or, to tie it in to another thread on this board, you automatically look away from the car that's cutting across your lane.

You'll find that both of these things happen about the same time.
 

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wills said:
Unconsciencely incompetent
Consciencely incompetent
Consciencely competent
Unconsciencely competent.
I fit in section 2 quite nicely. 8) All too aware that I know very little in the grand scheme of things

edit: To answer Raspberry's question, when you get good enough to realize you don't know enough, you're no longer a noob. Just be careful, right before that realization is a stage of "I get it! I'm invincible now!"
 

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Unconcious competency is expertise. I think newbieness ends around concious competency. It's a very subjective term. There are some dead giveaways. For example, if you post questions that are answerable by reading the owner's manual you are probably a newbie. If you need guidance on downshifting smoothly you are probably a newbie. Beginning to sound like redneck jokes, huh?

I don't view newbie as a pejoriative term. I've ridden with newbies who, while not real competent, rode well, rode within their limits, kept that "zone of safety" around them, etc. They were thinking all the time. That's a good, though inexperienced rider. I've know folks who have ridden for years and really tear up bikes quickly. They aren't newbies, but they are rotten riders.
 

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Good discussion, lot of meat in this thread!

+1
 

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Unconsciencely incompetent
Consciencely incompetent
Consciencely competent
Unconsciencely competent.
I find myself just starting to transition from 2 to 3........ but still much closer to #2.......

After our Catskill ride.......... I find myself with alot more self-confidence.
 

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andyauger said:
Beginning to sound like redneck jokes, huh?
*voice of Jeff Foxworthy*

If you think 'swingarm' is how you start an upper-body exercise....you might be a Noob.

If you think 'clipon' is a tie....you might be a Noob.

*/voice of Jeff Foxworthy*

Sorry for the mild threadjack....but that was just too tempting.

As for Noob or not - I read somewhere that ~20,000 miles or so, you're getting there.
 

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i stopped considering my self a noob after a srash last year where i had a punsture wound and lots of road rash and the only thing i kept thinking was i need to heal so i can get back on the bike. i think over coming the fear of riding is the first step but then being able to ride well, being able to modify and maintain your bike on your own are also important. the one thing i've always learned is that your never to experienced. my dads been riding for over 30 years and he even makes stupid mistakes last summer he dropped his bike with my mom on it because he came up to a stop and put his right foot down first . and the road was angled. my two cents
 

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I disagree with the notion that crashing makes you more experienced at riding beyond giving you insight as to the consequences of what NOT to do, or how you SHOULD react to a situation.

I think not crashing is a sign of luck and riding within your limits, definately a mixture of the two.

Major milestones for me have been:
1) Getting edumacated with MSF, books, and reading posts
2) Getting on the highway and feeling like I was going to blow off the bike and die at any moment
3) Feeling capable at operating the bike in all types of traffic and weather situations
4) Reacting to unforseen/preventable situations, e.g. evasive manuvers
5) Reacting to unforseen/self-induced situations, e.g. wrong apex or entry speed
6) Getting on a racetrack and being lapped by 125cc bikes
7) Looping a 49cc scooter due to a wheelie gone awry

12k miles and 0 'motorcycle' crashes later, I feel "less new" and somewhat suprised I haven't crashed yet. I am sure the day will come, but until then I say worry less about crashing and more about NOT crashing.

The only thing I learned from crashing the scooter was that if you don't respect a machine it will kick your ass with all 49cc's :D
 
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wills said:
Four stages of "ability"..or whatever you want to call it.

Unconsciencely incompetent
Consciencely incompetent
Consciencely competent
Unconsciencely competent.

Where do you fit as you ride? Do you have to think about what you are going to do, or does it just happem while you are riding?
That?s about as well put as it can get, no matter what the high-skill 'hobby'.   Just like learning R/C airplanes, your first trainer will get beaten and battered but still seem to always survive, the second plane(usually the one you wanted more then anything when you started) will be the one you promptly trash because you now 'think' you know how to fly 'em.  Motorcycles though tend to have the highest penalties for lying to yourself.   I think 'consciously incompetent' and 'unconsciously incompetent' should be reversed though for most people.  Everyone is nervous when they start, but as long as some basic skills are properly taught immediately its a good thing, you can never be too aware.   Overconfidence is the #1 cause of accidents, understanding that is the #1 reason for not having them.

If you always wear gear, constantly practice, know your limits at all times, do everything you can to avoid situations you know you are not ready to handle, and progessively and properly learn,  you may never BE a 'noob' to start with.  Some squid who can ride mile-long wheelies in a t-shirt and never bothered to get insurance or even a licence is no 'better' then someone fully armored up fresh out of the MSF who waits for a 1/10 mile gap in traffic before pulling out because that is what they are comfortable with at the moment.
 

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When you can ride a block long wheelie and know exactly when to put the front end down before the oil light comes on, you got sKiLLz ;D (j/k!)

The term "squid" and "noob" are thrown around *way* too much, mostly by the self-righteous types... don't take them too seriously.

Now to answer your question; when you can ride your bike in traffic during a heavy rain and be confident in your turning and stopping ability then you're no noob.
 
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