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Discussion Starter #1
A few questions 600, 750 which is better? Is the 750 stiffer? Which has more adjustment? Is any year better than another? I know 97-99 will fit, but which is best for this frankenstein project? Thanks. Zip
 

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All I Know

I bought a 1999 GSXR 600 shock and installed it on my bike. I weigh 165 in gear, so I tried to match the weight of the bike as much as possible. I have it set pretty fat on static sag right now, about 50mm. Compression and rebound are about in the middle. This seems to work well for me, but I'm still experimenting.
 
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rework?

I thought you had to have them resprung and revalved?

-toolbox
 

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GSXR Shock

They don't have to be resprung/valved.
The stock GSXR shock will be a definite improvement over the SV's stock shock. Revalve and Respringing the Gixxer shock will make it even better.

I have one I'll be putting on Late this year or early next year.

nate
 

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The stock SV shock has a spring rate in the neighborhood of 500 lbs/inch. The Gixxer 600 & 750 units both run in the 375 lb/inch range, so they're considerably softer.
I've been running a Gixxer shock on my SV for a couple of years now- it is a huge improvement over the stock unit in terms of plush ride and controlled motion of the rear wheel.
The SV apparently has a VERY progressive rear linkage, which may be why you can get away with running such a soft spring without bottoming it out (at least I never have). On the other hand, there's a lot to be said for matching your spring rate to your weight and riding style. I understand that if you weigh more than 150 lbs or so, respringing and revalving the GSXR shock is recommended. But this should run (with the cost of the shock itself included) arond $300 or so- nowhere near the cost of even a Fox, never mind a Penske.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input but...

I talked to a suspension shop out this way. They said they would rework/freshen up the shock for $60. PS: I can die happy now. I got a reply from the SV guru Mr bill Metz. :D Bill did you just set your shock for static sag, and click from there for your adjustment? If not, how did you determine your shock settings. Which model is your shock 600/750 and year? thanks Zip
 

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That's what I said

I didn't bother respringing or revalving for the reasons mentioned above. Reading my note, it's not clear that was my method.

Being light with a light bike, I thought the GSXR 600 shock would work without mods. I had the stock shock on the softest spring setting and it was still too stiff for my liking. When I first installed the GSXR shock I set it for 35mm sag. Trying different combos, I found that 50mm static sag in the back makes the front and rear feel like they're working together (stock front, 15W oil, 35mm sag).

I'm still playing with the compression/rebound settings. I have compression one click soft, rebound dead center. I think that's where I'll leave it.

Be forewarned that not everyone likes their bikes set the same. This works for me so far.
 

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Re: Thanks for the input but...

\" \" said:
PS: I can die happy now. I got a reply from the SV guru Mr bill Metz. :D
Oooh, if I'ma guru does that mean I get to talk like \"Apu\" on \"The Simpsons\"? Okay, imagine that's what I sound like.

$60 is a screaming deal to have a shock reworked, so much so that I'd suspect that this would involve a minimal disassembly, clean out the guts, slip in some new oil, and recharge it with nitrogen. If you weigh in at or under the magical 150 lb mark, I'd say definitely go for it. Otherwise check into what a true respring/revalve (where they change the damping rates to siut the spring's rate) job would run.

Mine is set up to give 40mm of sag, and I have the compression damping set 1/2 turn out from the firmest setting, and the rebound damping set at the firmest setting. These work acceptably for my 155 lb carcass, but again this tells me that heavier riders may overtax the shock's damping capabilities. And I plan to have this done over the winter.

At least that's what works for me...

Bill
 

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GSXR Shock

Hmm. I weigh 170. Should I keep the stock shock for racing, or go with the GSXR shock I have? I can't afford to have the Gixxer shock reworked. Not now, and prolly not till 1/2way through the season.

So far, I've hated the stocker. I don't mind a somewhat soft ride.

Nate
 

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By all means, go with the GSXR unit. The stock shock, IMHO, would be dangerous to race on.

OTOH, if you're not prepared to shell out major ca$h for tires and entry fees and safety equipment (and a decent shock might be considered a part of that category) then you might want to re-think the racing thing. I don't know anybody who races who doesn't end up spending at least a couple of thousand dollars a season, just for the essentials.

Bill
 
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stock shock dangerous to race on ????

been racing on ming for 2 years now and havent had any major issues. I've been ablt to turn 1:19 at loudon on a stock bike + an M4 pipe. Forks are stock also with 30 weight oil in them (rediently added 25mm preload), and here are the kickers,

I weigh 215 in race gear

and

others have gone faster with the stock shock

Only lately has it given me any issues, 90 degree heat and the end of a GTL (30 min) race had a bit of fade, otherwise its been fine, its one of the things that Suz did right, yea, there is no adjustment, but its real close to wht you need to ride fast. Just crank the preload.

Steve
http://on.to/grrr
 

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Bmetz99,

I'm well aware of entry fees, tires, leathers, etc. That's why I CAN'T afford to do the shock. Because I do have those other expenses.

I'm NOT gonna scrimp on gear, so can't cut costs there. I'm already not getting a slip-on or full race exhaust this coming year. That comes later. Shock before that.

I'm gonna have to get by on the bare acceptable minimum if I want to race this year. So, NOT reworking the shock this year is one area to save costs. Another is NOT getting sharkskinz, but a similar body for less. Unless I flip the bike, the bodywork will barely scrape with the MB motorsports sliders.

I'm rambling.

Nate
 

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Re: stock shock dangerous to race on ????

\" \" said:
been racing on ming for 2 years now and havent had any major issues. I've been ablt to turn 1:19 at loudon on a stock bike + an M4 pipe. Forks are stock also with 30 weight oil in them (rediently added 25mm preload), and here are the kickers,

I weigh 215 in race gear

and

others have gone faster with the stock shock

Only lately has it given me any issues, 90 degree heat and the end of a GTL (30 min) race had a bit of fade, otherwise its been fine, its one of the things that Suz did right, yea, there is no adjustment, but its real close to wht you need to ride fast. Just crank the preload.

Steve
http://on.to/grrr
Yikes! For a number of reasons.
First, the stock fork springs are approriate for someone about 2/3rds of your weight. Yeah, you can get rid of the excessive dive by running thick oil in them, but I think you'd be amazed (and turn even faster laps) with a properly set up fork, that is, one with heavier springs and the appropriate weight of oil. It's obvious that you can make this setup work, but that doesn't mean that you couldn't make it WAY better for under $100.

Ditto on the stcok shock. When I said it was dangerous, I was thinking specifically about the damping, or lack thereof. Mine was shot after maybe 3000 miles. The back end would pogo all over the place in bumpy turns. This did nothing for rear end traction, and made the handling, uh, interesting. Again, I think you'd be pleasantly surprised and rewarded by a better suspension setup.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hey Ruefus

The place is called Tech Care. It is located in Waterford MI. I will get the number and what is included in the rework once I call them back tomorrow. Zip
 
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BIll, you said you weigh 155, and used the stock gixxer spring & valving? Which model and year gixxer unit is it?
 

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Re:

\" \" said:
BIll, you said you weigh 155, and used the stock gixxer spring & valving? Which model and year gixxer unit is it?
Wish I could tell you, I'll see if Zoran remembers. IIRC there's no difference between the 96-99 GSXR 600 & 750 shocks- they used exactly the same units on both bikes and made up the difference in leverage ratios. That, or they're so close that there's no functional difference. Again, I'll se what Z-man has to say and get back to you.

Bill
 

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Zoran says:

\" if there is difference I dont know about.
as far as I know they are same. \"

That pretty much sums it up.

Bill
 
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So the fact that you didn't re-spring the gixxer unit means that the SV must be way over-sprung for light riders.....because that's quite a big reduction in spring rate.
 
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Re: stock shock dangerous to race on ????

Yea, the forks are dangerous, especailly with the stock oil, or even 10 weight, 30 weight wears out fast, so you need to keep up with it, I found it needs to be changed every 5 race weekends to keep the front whjeel from po-going in T3 at Loudon under heavy breaking, but as far as the rates on the shock, I cranked the preload all the way up, and the only time I have an issue, is in real hot weather at the end of a GTL race (after about 20 laps) it doesn't like the transitions at the T3-T4 NASCAR oval crosing).

At to the stock shock on the street, I can't say, never ridden an SV on the street, but I imaging it could be an issue do to the fact that you don't hang off like you would on the track.

I thought about the GSXR shock, but decided to pass due to the cost to re-spring-re-valve (with that much diffrence in spring rate, it sould need it, especially if your going racing) in favor of going with a Olins or Penski (working on the 2003 race budget).

Back to the forks, I will be taking care of those also, planning on the F3 internals fork mod, I all ready have all the parts, it just the lack of time holding this up.

With both of these mods and a diet to get my weight with race gear on down to 200, I will beging my quest for a 1:17 lap around loudon.

Steve
GRRR
http://on.to/grrr


Re: stock shock dangerous to race on ????



quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by
been racing on ming for 2 years now and havent had any major issues. I've been ablt to turn 1:19 at loudon on a stock bike + an M4 pipe. Forks are stock also with 30 weight oil in them (rediently added 25mm preload), and here are the kickers,

I weigh 215 in race gear

and

others have gone faster with the stock shock

Only lately has it given me any issues, 90 degree heat and the end of a GTL (30 min) race had a bit of fade, otherwise its been fine, its one of the things that Suz did right, yea, there is no adjustment, but its real close to wht you need to ride fast. Just crank the preload.

Steve
http://on.to/grrr
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Yikes! For a number of reasons.
First, the stock fork springs are approriate for someone about 2/3rds of your weight. Yeah, you can get rid of the excessive dive by running thick oil in them, but I think you'd be amazed (and turn even faster laps) with a properly set up fork, that is, one with heavier springs and the appropriate weight of oil. It's obvious that you can make this setup work, but that doesn't mean that you couldn't make it WAY better for under $100.

Ditto on the stcok shock. When I said it was dangerous, I was thinking specifically about the damping, or lack thereof. Mine was shot after maybe 3000 miles. The back end would pogo all over the place in bumpy turns. This did nothing for rear end traction, and made the handling, uh, interesting. Again, I think you'd be pleasantly surprised and rewarded by a better suspension setup.

Bill
 

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The tale of the stopwatch

Someone is doing very well with the stock setup. It proves the old adage that there are some riders who can ride fast on anything, others who can't on the best equipment around. It also shows how subjective all this can sometimes be.
 
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