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Are you interested in Learning 3D Paremetric Modeling?

  • Yes, Self Paced

    Votes: 7 53.8%
  • Yes, Supervised

    Votes: 3 23.1%
  • No

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • What is 3D.... I want Bacon!

    Votes: 1 7.7%
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Discussion Starter #1
There has been interest in another thread about learning 3D. I'm just wanting to gauge interest b/c if there is enough I am willing to set up an online class (free) that will go through Inventor.

If just a couple people are interested I can give help via e-mail, but if there are several I will invest some time to make a through online class. The next question is if you are interested in an online class are you more interested in a self paced one, or one that I lead, and review work that you do (supervised)?

I already have most of it setup for my current class, but would need to supplement my lectures with more online material, and would make it independent of a book.

the reason I'm going with Inventor is that anyone with a .edu address can get a free educational copy, and the skills are easily transferred to SolidWorks or other programs.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My intent for this one would be for people that already know drafting basics, but could also make one for noobs. what do you think?
 

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Just wondering how inventor compares to some of the other modeling softwares? Currently I have background in Catia, Unigraphics and SolidWorks. It is always helpful to pick up other packages, but it doesnt' seem like anyone in my particular industry really uses inventor. It is mostly SW and ProE. - What are the benefits of Inventor? Thanks for the help and willingness to show others. - Skister
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just wondering how inventor compares to some of the other modeling softwares? Currently I have background in Catia, Unigraphics and SolidWorks. It is always helpful to pick up other packages, but it doesnt' seem like anyone in my particular industry really uses inventor. It is mostly SW and ProE. - What are the benefits of Inventor? Thanks for the help and willingness to show others. - Skister
I have used SolidWorks (a lot), and Pro/e (in school) the way you create sketches, and work with features are the same. The difference come into options within commands. (ie. Extrude you cant go two different distances from the profile, but you can get the same effect by having workplanes set up at the limits of your extrusion.)

I have done one consulting job using inventor, and almost got another one (both structural steel) one was a SE in San jose, and the other was in Florida.

I think Inventor is a good intro package to learn the basics, and then move to more advanced packages. Somethings such as working with formulas are much easier in Inventor, but not nearly as powerful. It lets you focus on the principals, and forming good habits, w/o all the advanced options. I absolutely hate doing lofts in Inventor, SW is much easier in that aspect.

It is still playing catchup to solidworks, just like solidworks is following Pro/e, all kind of in the pattern of when they were started.
 

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I would be interested. I prefer self paced.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Looks like there is some good interest. I'll start working on putting something together. I think I'll set it up so It can be self paced, but if you want feedback I'll look at what you do.
 

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Thanks for the comparison. That is a good explanation of where it sits compared to other programs and whether or not I added my name to the list. This is great of you for taking the time and effort to get others learning. A+ for you - Skister


I have used SolidWorks (a lot), and Pro/e (in school) the way you create sketches, and work with features are the same. The difference come into options within commands. (ie. Extrude you cant go two different distances from the profile, but you can get the same effect by having workplanes set up at the limits of your extrusion.)

I have done one consulting job using inventor, and almost got another one (both structural steel) one was a SE in San jose, and the other was in Florida.

I think Inventor is a good intro package to learn the basics, and then move to more advanced packages. Somethings such as working with formulas are much easier in Inventor, but not nearly as powerful. It lets you focus on the principals, and forming good habits, w/o all the advanced options. I absolutely hate doing lofts in Inventor, SW is much easier in that aspect.

It is still playing catchup to solidworks, just like solidworks is following Pro/e, all kind of in the pattern of when they were started.
 

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Yes please. :D I'll do whatever pace you are offering, self or supervised curriculum.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry for the delay in getting anything together, it was a really busy first year, and summer.

I am recording my lectures this semester.

I will be putting together a page with the assignments soon (hopefully). But at least this way you can get the info and try things out yourself. You can join the Autodesk student community with a .edu address, or use this link with any email.
 

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I'm a SolidWorks user, but appreciate what you are doing smiley

I'm so far ahead in my Engineering Graphics course that I might as well be teaching it :p Actually, I spent my class time in high school making lesson plans for my teacher to use in his other classes. CAD is just so friggin' awesome!
 

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I'm just now moving from 2d to 3d - I bought a copy of Alibre. The thing that sold me was the parametric model of the 3d modeling - man, what a time saver.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'm so far ahead in my Engineering Graphics course that I might as well be teaching it :p Actually, I spent my class time in high school making lesson plans for my teacher to use in his other classes. CAD is just so friggin' awesome!
Same here, I was always way ahead.

I'm just now moving from 2d to 3d - I bought a copy of Alibre. The thing that sold me was the parametric model of the 3d modeling - man, what a time saver.
Hadn't seen that before, I'll try it.
 
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