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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I recently got my bike back together after the last wreck. I had scraped up the waterpump cover(but amazingly no damage done to the crankcase cover, I dunno how). After installing a new cover and various gaskets + fluids I started her up. No *clunks*. Good. No *tings*. Good. No scraping sounds. Very good. She still runs smooth. But I watched as my engine temp rose to 200+ degrees in ten minutes. It was about 15 degrees F here last night... not exactly the temperature to let an idling bike get up to 200F. At 211 degrees my water pump hose popped off because I neglected to screw down the hose clamp *doh!*. No biggie, I shut the bike off in a spray of coolant to wait for the morning. Today I refilled the coolant, clamped down the hose, and started her up.
This is the issue.

When I refilled the coolant, none of it seemed to enter the coolant reservoir. After a few minutes running my bike, it STILL didn't get out of the radiator and into the res. The water hose is only luke-warm and very squishy...telling me there's no pressure whatsoever. So now I'm wondering if I somehow managed to re-assemble the waterpump incorrectly. But I'm also wondering there's something clogging the water-circuit. That would kill me.

Anyways I'm wondering what you guys think about these symptoms. Thanks for any input.
-Dean
 

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Do you have any idea on how much coolant is in the system? you may not have it filled all the way.

I dont know if this is the correct way to do it or not but usually fill the rad up all the way then start the bike up and continue filling until the radiator is full.
You can also tell if the pump is pumping or if you have any clogs by running the bike until the thermostat opens and the water starts circulating through the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well I ran the bike a bit. I didn't think the SV cooling system is so similar to a car's. A valve opens to allow water to pass through the radiator once engine temps rise above ~180. Atleast that's what I noticed because my temps would hit 190 with a cold radiator, then drop to 180 and the radiator would heat up, FAST! After 200+ degree temps I shut 'er down and let cool, but STILL not much coolant entered the reservior. Still, there's a bit more than before. I thought running the bike would get rid of any air pockets... Is there a special technique to getting rid of those air pockets?

Also, I reved up a little to get the temps 200+ but at about 210 something let loose and cooland steamed out of (apparently) the cap. I dunno if that was because of too much pressure (as in the coolant, from there being too little amount, had just gotten too hot) or if some crazy demon has control of my bike and is f*cking with me. Any ideas?

My bike is taking on a personality all of it's own...maybe this is just 'her rebellion phase' :-/
-Dean
 

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All I can add to help is that my wife's bike frequently gets up to 210-215 when sitting still. It's always done that since new. I'd say as long as it doesn't go over that, you'd be okay. IMO.
 

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inthe service manual it says that when you are topping off the coolant level when it is low, you should put the coolant directly into the overflow tank. that means lifting the tank, taking th lid off the overflow tank and using a long funnel to pour in the coolant.

it only mentions putting coolant directly into the radiator when you are changing the fluids.

i'm not sure if that would make a difference in what you are seeing, but that is what the manual says.

however, i regularly see temps over 200 when i am in traffic or just not moving at a decent pace. my fan comes on btween 210-215 degrees. haven't noticed any drawbacks to it getting this hot. but be worried if it gets that hot and the fan is not coming on.
 

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Deaner3D said:
Is there a special technique to getting rid of those air pockets?
There is. While your bike is COOL remove the radiator cap. Start your bike and slowly sway it side to side while pausing at the lowest points. If you have air pockets the level of the fluid will drop...add coolant as appropriate via the radiator. And if the over flow tank is low do as Shultzboy suggests and fill it to the F line.
 

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Deaner3D said:
well I ran the bike a bit.  I didn't think the SV cooling system is so similar to a car's.  A valve opens to allow water to pass through the radiator once engine temps rise above ~180.  Atleast that's what I noticed because my temps would hit 190 with a cold radiator, then drop to 180 and the radiator would heat up, FAST!  -Dean
Actually that is just like a cars system.  We use a thermostat in cars to do the same thing and they usually open at 195deg from the factory and then the fan(s) will kick on at 210-220deg.  blkvwgolf had the same idea I did as it is what I do when changing my coolant in a car, fill it up until it acts as if no more fluid can go into the raidiator, leave the cap off and crank up the motorcycle and let it idle until it reaches operating temp of 180-190 and the thermostat opens (if we have one) then you should notice the fluid all of a sudden drop...continue adding your coolant/water mix until the level stabilizes just at the top of the raidiator..make sure the bike is level also.   This is the same method I have used on all my cars and dirtbikes over the years and never had a problem.

Only other thing I can think is wether or not your water pump was damaged in the crash?? If we do have a thermostat on these bikes then I have seen them fail on cars and usually they stay open all the way or closed all the way. Either one will cause a high temp. If it is open the fluid will continue to pass through the raidiator all the time and eventually the raidiator can't keep up in cooling it down like it should...doesn't stay in their long enough. Fully closed is worse since the fluid will not be cooled in the engine and you would see a dramatic increase in temps. I believe the sensor on our bikes is in the raidiator so if it is closed you are not actually seeing the true temps inside the engine. Not enough fluid in the raidiator will also give a false reading since the sensor is not submerged in the fluid all the time.

One way I used to check and see if a thermostat was working was to take it and place it in the freezer. In a few minutes the thermostat would close, place it in boiling or very hot water to see if it fully opens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks for all the help guys. I didn't realize I was supposed to fill the coolant into the overflow container and not just the radiator cap. The coolant system is a bit more complicated than I thought, but it's all getting clear to me now. Once again, thanks for the input.
-Dean
 
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