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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Alth 310mm rotors used on my 200 GSXR front end rattle around at slower speeds when hitting any bumps in the road. So much so that it's embarrasing at times how loud the rattling is.

I figured the racing crowd here may have a solution (or...the opposite is true, the racers don't care about the noise, as it is gone the moment the pads grab the rotor)

Any ideas? I know semi-floating rotors have differing type of spring-washers, etc mounted with each button to help eliminate this.
 

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They are supposed to be like that. Nothing you can do other then make them non floating.

why did you get floating rotors for the street?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The price was right and their performance and longevity have been great. Also, they weren't THAT noisy for a long time. This is the third season on them with close to 45,000 miles. I am thinking maybe the buttons are getting worn and sloppy(er)
 

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Buttons can get clogged up with brake dust. Usually it means they dont float. But the buttons can wear as well. On my Brembo floating rotor, they have the wave springs to prevent rattle and the brake dust locks them up. Had to pull and clean them this year. It confuses me as they are marketed as full floating, but use the wave spring. Oh well, they stop the Husky just fine.

Might want to pull the rotors, disassemble and check the buttons. You might need new ones to bring them back up to spec.
 

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What are floating rotors?
 

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There are three types of brake rotors: solid, semifloating, and full floating.

With a solid rotor a single piece of metal is bolted to the wheel. Some HD's are like this.

With semifloating, you have a center piece and a separate outer part that the brake pads touch and the two are connected by a bunch of round "buttons" that allow a small amount of movement between the two, usually a wave spring or an interference fit between the buttons and the rotor/carrier.

With full floating, the braking surface is relatively loose so that it can move around to hopefully become in perfect alignment with the pads. Full floating rotors are less likely to pulse than solid or semifloating rotors. Full floating rotors make noise at low speeds as the parts move around, since they're kind of loose.

The reason for full floating is for heat RETENTION. It keeps the rotor a uniform temp and braking more consistent.

Here's a Galfer explanation.

http://www.galferusa.com/floating-rotors/
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Buttons can get clogged up with brake dust. Usually it means they dont float. But the buttons can wear as well. On my Brembo floating rotor, they have the wave springs to prevent rattle and the brake dust locks them up. Had to pull and clean them this year. It confuses me as they are marketed as full floating, but use the wave spring. Oh well, they stop the Husky just fine.

Might want to pull the rotors, disassemble and check the buttons. You might need new ones to bring them back up to spec.
I will dissasemble soon and check this out. The rotor on the right side, when held and force applied, move around a bit, just like when they were new.
The rotor on the left side is loosy goosey, so is not bound by any dust or detritus.

When I used to run factory GSXR rotors, I had to keep the buttons clean or they would jam up, causing pulsing. That's another reason I went to full floaters.

Thanks Wacky
 
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