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Discussion Starter #1
I use my SV to commute to and from work, and of late, I've been caught in many rain storms. I'm usually prepared as far as gear is concerned and I have one of those handy squeegee things that goes over the thumb of my glove so I can wipe my helmet visor as I ride.

When I get home from a rainy ride, I typically wipe the bike down as much as possible. Are there other things I should be doing to prevent rust, electrical shorts, and any other problems that may occur over years when I do this type of riding? I once heard that all electrical connections should be covered with dielectric grease to prevent them from corroding over time. Has anybody done this? I just want to ensure that my bike remains nice and shiny and running well for years.
 

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If you have an air compresser you can blow out all the nooks and crannies. I think the most important spot is that front spark plug which may get went and cause you to lose the front cylinder. Aside from that I've had no issues with riding in the rain. I usually let it run for just a bit so that some of the moisture steams out of her before I put her away.
 

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the $30 Wal-Mart "leaf blower" sucks for blowing leave but is fantastic for drying off your car or bike :D
 

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Rain riding may require extra care for your chain: rust, sand, grit, etc.
 

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You didn't say anything about your chain.

You should - at minimum - wipe and lube your chain after riding in the wet, and clean and lube much more often.

Other than that - you're good.
 
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I think the most important thing is to not immediately put the cover on the bike. Bikes are not made of paper mache (sp), they won't melt in the rain. If you immediately cover the bike up, it will create moisture, which in a way is different than being wet. Moist air will find EVERY nook and cranny if you are effectively "steaming" your bike by putting it under a cover hot and wet.

As for blowing it dry, I personally think that might do more harm than good, by possibly forcing water into tight cracks where it shouldn't be. Just let it air dry, remember, it is a machine, not a dainty piece of art.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I do realize riding in the rain increases the frequency that I should clean and oil the chain. I have not been wiping it down after every rainy ride, but I should start that.

As for the cover, I don't ever cover my bike (except winter) so I'm not concerned about moisture like that. I keep the bike parked inside my garage. There are no windows to allow sunlight to fade the paint or seats. Because of how frequently I ride it, dust doesn't build up. :wink:
 

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Ruefus said:
You didn't say anything about your chain.

You should - at minimum - wipe and lube your chain after riding in the wet, and clean and lube much more often.

Other than that - you're good.
But when you lube a wet chain, aren't you sealing in water? I use chain wax and if the chain was freshly waxed prior to 5 miles in the rain I'd guess that it's probably relatively good to go for a few hundred. If I have 200 miles on the lube, then I'll clean it after it rains. But even then, I clean in the evening and let the chain dry off the kerosene overnight prior to lubing.

Someday I'll have a Scottoiler
 

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Obviously - cleaning, drying and lubing is best.

In a pinch - adding lube is better than no lube at all.

At a bare minimum - I'd hit the chain with WD40. The WD is, literally, for Water Displacement.
 

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Ruefus said:
Obviously - cleaning, drying and lubing is best.

In a pinch - adding lube is better than no lube at all.

At a bare minimum - I'd hit the chain with WD40. The WD is, literally, for Water Displacement.
Isn't WD potentially harmful to sealed o-ring chains?
 

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Ben_JamminVFCC said:
Isn't WD potentially harmful to sealed o-ring chains?
You'd think the detergents in WD-40 would do bad things to the O-rings but enought people have been doing it for long enough that it seems to be ok.

The book says to use oil, in fact it actually specifically states not to use chain lube... I have no idea why.
 
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donniej said:
Ben_JamminVFCC said:
Isn't WD potentially harmful to sealed o-ring chains?
You'd think the detergents in WD-40 would do bad things to the O-rings but enought people have been doing it for long enough that it seems to be ok.

The book says to use oil, in fact it actually specifically states not to use chain lube... I have no idea why.
There are no detergents in WD-40, I have access to the actual ingredients. The worry comes from the sovents drying out the o-rings. WD-40 isn't nor ever has been a lubricant. Your chain will not go to hell if you dont't immediately dry it and rub chain oil all over it. Wait until the next time its dry, and you have the chain warmed up and hit it with VERY LITTLE lube. People who get "fling" from their chains are using entirely too much oil. Remember, you aren't really "lubing" the chain, you are sealing out moisture and dirty from getting near the seal on the links.
 

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Hose

I just hose down the road grime and leave it alone. Chain wax is pretty waterproof (doesn't wash off). If anything I think chains get dirtier riding in dry conditions.
 

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I find that what picks up gunge in the rain is the shift linkage, the linkage is low, water comes up of the road loaded with grime from your front wheel, grimy water also drips from your boots above you would be surprised, while quite often, I clean and regrease the linkage joints and their not really dirty, and other times theres a sand pit.

, the chain is rotating so it flings stuff off, and andy's right, dry blowing stuff is more likely to stick to your chain

how dirty things get in the raid depends on your road surface, but traffic more than anything else, try to make an extra big space in front of you to allow for road spray from traffic in front of you to settle down, it helps with visibility too. heavier traveled roads tend to have more residues from oil & antifreeze in the grime, lessor traveled roads have more abrasives
 
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Box fan works great, too!

We get a lot of rain here. After a wet ride, I park in the garage as usual and turn on a big box fan. I'll usually lower the garage door and open the door to the house to help pull the extra humidity out of the garage. It seems that most things rust worse when they are left outside overnight... and I don't know why that is. It's just an observation. Stuff that gets wet and then gets dry again doesn't seem to rust so badly. FWIW

Also, my 2 cents on bikes and rain is that they were meant to be ridden and ought to be designed to survive the day outside. I ride it and put it up wet in a nice dry garage (with the fan going to make it dry). I don't cover while at work. If something starts to rust, then it's going to get replaced with a non-rusting part. That's why there are stainless bolts.
 

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Definately take the advice about adding the greese to the front spark plug!!! Learned my lesson the hard way :oops: no fun....
 

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Re: Box fan works great, too!

Bladeforger said:
We get a lot of rain here. After a wet ride, I park in the garage as usual and turn on a big box fan. I'll usually lower the garage door and open the door to the house to help pull the extra humidity out of the garage. It seems that most things rust worse when they are left outside overnight... and I don't know why that is. It's just an observation. Stuff that gets wet and then gets dry again doesn't seem to rust so badly. FWIW

Also, my 2 cents on bikes and rain is that they were meant to be ridden and ought to be designed to survive the day outside. I ride it and put it up wet in a nice dry garage (with the fan going to make it dry). I don't cover while at work. If something starts to rust, then it's going to get replaced with a non-rusting part. That's why there are stainless bolts.
I've never had any rust problems, but maybe that's cause my scottoiler keeps things well coated
 
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