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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After much thought....I bit the bullet and ordered the Factory Pro offset key with puller kit. Seems a LOT of cash for what you get, but the result IS worth the money and effort.:) It looked like you could get almost as much advance by slotting the crankshaft sensor bracket, and that might be the better way to go if money is tight.

But...I figured it was good to have the puller in the box anyhow so the offset key was the way we went. Installation is pretty straightforward except for getting the rotor off the crankshaft. Some are tight, and some are really tight. Mine was borderline really tight.

The puller is nicely made and fit the internal rotor threads beautifully, very snug but smooth. Per Factory Pro's recommendation, I hit it with the electric impact gun a few smacks, then waited, then hit it again, then waited...a couple more times before it finally came off. They say some won't come off so easily and need to sit under tension overnight to be removed. I don't normally use impacts on pullers, but in this case I'm glad to make the exception.

Once the rotor is off, you now need to get the stock key out of the crank slot. This was harder than it should have been as that sucker was IN there! Got it out and tapped the offset key in place. Getting the rotor back on proved to be a bit challenging as you must get the starter drive gear in the one way clutch on the back of the rotor as you also engage the reduction gear as well as hit the key in the slot. I ended up being stymied on my first try as the starter reduction gear didn't go, so I had to pull the rotor back off and use a better technique. Putting the starter gear into the one way clutch, and then both on the crank worked fine and a little blue locktite on the bolt later it was socked down tight.

So...how does it run? The motor LIKES IT! Idle speed picked up about 200 rpm and it definitely has more light throttle torque down low. It really needed to be kept above 3k to pull without distress before, and now will lug to 2500 without complaint. I don't ride it like that and this was for testing only, but the advance really tamed the low rpm running.

Cruising in the 4-5K range is very strong and needs less throttle to climb the same mountains. Gas mileage seems to have increased by 2-3mpg's. I've only run three tanks through so this is a very small sample, but I'm confident that the bike is more efficient in cruise now.

Top end power does not seem to be much affected one way or the other. This engine runs pretty strongly when revved up, and might have actually pick up a little, but top end power wasn't why I wanted the advanced timing. In normal riding, the engine is smoother and stronger. Very happy with the change.

Since I drilled the STV's, the engine was running a little ragged feeling on the 87 octane so I have been running 93. Bumping the timing makes a little better use of the high octane fuel although it still might not be needed to ward off detonation. My Hot-Rod brain says an 11.6:1 should be running on the best pump gas available...so that is what I run now. Bike runs excellent.

I wanted to document the 4 degree key install as the search doesn't return much info on the SV1K using it. Seems a lot of the 650 guys are using them, and it appears from my example that the 1K likes it as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually, the 'Official' instructions go like this:

SUZUKI IGNITION ADVANCE INSTRUCTIONS

YOU MUST USE A 1/2" AIR IMPACT WRENCH! (Caps are theirs)

Remove rotor bolt. Remove flywheel with supplied puller.

Rotate crank so that the keyway slot is up. Install new key with offset
left to advance timing.

There! Pretty simple enough. The link you provided has all the helpful tips you do need to make the install without damaging things. The idler shaft DOES come out with the cover and the idler gear won't turn without it...or like they say..Stuff will break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I havent done it yet, but i found this. Maybe this would be an alternative? It was on an FZR thread.

http://fzronline.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=43&t=4303
Sure, you could slot the crank pickup a bit, but don't think you can get a full 5 degrees doing it on the SV1K....maybe 4? There is only a little room for the pickup to be moved in the case, but it would advance the timing a bit if you want to go that route.
 

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Sure, you could slot the crank pickup a bit, but don't think you can get a full 5 degrees doing it on the SV1K....maybe 4? There is only a little room for the pickup to be moved in the case, but it would advance the timing a bit if you want to go that route.
1 thing i didn't catch on this post, was this was for 2nd gens. Mine is a 1st. Is that going to be an issue?:eek:
 

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Found this old thread intriguing- playing with the PC V mapping I added 4° to much of the 'Yosh 3/4' map...as Rob observed, it's livened up the throttle response through the part-throttle midrange (y)

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow....old thread! But much has been learned since this was posted concerning the ignition timing on SV1K's. I've gotten the Woolich ECU flash kit and have the timing tables to look at...and my initial thinking that it wants more timing at low and mid rpm was indeed correct....it's on the top end where things get weird. The stock mapping has over 46 degrees of advance on the top....and the fueling is super rich. Tried leaning a bit and it didn't like that by laying down...which didn't make sense because mine was running deep into the 10:1 A/F range. Once I saw the ignition mapping it all became clear...Suzuki was over-advancing the timing then smothering it with fuel...which DOES work to reduce the NOx but at the expense of fuel economy.

Backing the top end timing down to the low 30's allowed the fuel mapping to be leaned to a more reasonable 12.5-13:1 for best power. :) So...lots more timing down low and in the cruise midrange...but less up on top is what my SV1K wanted.
 

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Acknowledged- I've bumped up the table across the midrange/small-to-medium throttle cells, but left the upper revs/WFO cells and the very bottom at 0.

More work to be done- it's jussssst nibbling at a lean surge on the highway, 4800-5000 revs- but that's easy to fix, and it's already the happiest it's been.

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