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Discussion Starter #1
Need help with adjusting pre load from setting 1 to something higher. Was set at 3, (factory pre set) and moved the adjuster clock wise and now can't get a proper grip with the Suzuki tool to adjust back for a higher setting. Has anyone else have this problem and what was the solution? The frame impedes on the left side and the tool kit housing impedes on the right side. Thanks for your help!
 

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very big dumb
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if it's a factory shock... use pliers lol.
or go from the other side. may need to remove a rearset bracket or brake reservoir.
 

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The factory shock is pretty much shot at this point anyway so you may as well use something like pliers. I have used a long punch/chisel/screwdriver (long metal bar) and a hammer to tap the adjustment collar but that's a red neck way of getting it done. Old shock though so it doesn't matter that much.
I say it's probably shot because as they age and miles go up the seals that keep the oil in the shock body wear out like fork seals and suddenly you find yourself without any rear dampening flopflopflop. You can look for oil leaking on the body of the shock to check. Mine lasted a couple of years after I bought it but then gave out and I did the "cheap" gsxr option. This is in fact not a very cheap option as it often requires a mod to your battery box and a different battery ($100 if you get the one you want) and whadyaknow now you have a fancier looking shock that is just as old as the one you replaced so you still need to service it. I wound up with the in-between option and spent $400 on a YSS shock and it has worked fine. If I had to do it again (and my bike was a decade newer) I would go with Ohlins or something better but this does the job.
Long answer, sorry. Use a long metal bar and a hammer.
 

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MOTORADOR
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the reply. The bike is an 06 with very low usage and has not been abused, a bit of a creampuff. I didn't realize this part would wear out or time out. Based on the two responses, I gather its not something that is easy to service, certainly Suzuki didn't made it easy to reach this adjustment with the supplied tool. We will continue to try to adjust this thing and work on novel ways to get a hold of it and turn the adjustment counter clock wise.
 

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Thanks for the reply. The bike is an 06 with very low usage and has not been abused, a bit of a creampuff. I didn't realize this part would wear out or time out. Based on the two responses, I gather its not something that is easy to service, certainly Suzuki didn't made it easy to reach this adjustment with the supplied tool. We will continue to try to adjust this thing and work on novel ways to get a hold of it and turn the adjustment counter clock wise.
Yeah, use pliers on it. I cranked mine all the way down pretty much as soon as I got the bike (don't remember it being a problem at all), but it's just spring pre-load, and the shock is sealed and non serviceable. All it does is hold the bike at the pre-set level and (maybe) return it to said level after hitting a bump. Damping is slight to say the least.
Start canvasing eBay for a replacement shock (I used a '12 ZX14, then changed the spring for my weight) that has actual compression and rebound setting, is rebuildable, and has threaded (instead of stepped) pre-load adjustment.
Then you need to look at your fork, as it's as lacking in stock form as the shock..
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Not sure how you get pliers on this adjustment, its hard enough getting any tool in the space provided, let alone getting a turn on with a wrench/plier. Replacing the shock, wasn't on the winter to-do list but I'll pass the suggestion to the rider. He's still new to riding, not sure he really knows what a proper ride, or a poor ride is suppose to feel like.
 

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Thinking back, I used the tool from the kit to do mine. It's a case of "barely", but it does fit with some fiddling. I didn't have to take anything off, but you could try lifting up on the rear of the bike while the other person moves the adjuster. Might give you a little extra working room.
 

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It's stylish to be "offended" by simple words now days. All came about with the online era. "Red Neck" is considered offensive by people who try to put themselves in a position to "feel sorry for" people they deem lesser than themselves.
F**k 'em.. ;)
 

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Call the method whatever you want... but a long flat bladed screwdriver combined with some assistance from a hammer is the way to go. You don’t need to bludgeon it - just tap it. At least that’s what our track expert mechanic does and he knows all the spring rate codes from each manufacturer off the top of his head, so I personally trust his judgement on how to adjust a shock...
 

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You may know this but the site will "fix" the word red neck to ** if you leave it as one word. I suppose it is slang, but I didn't think it was offensive.
Hmmmm, maybe you misunderstood my fix. 🤔

It had nothing to do with offensive words but just stating that, at the end of the day, the hammer and chisel always seems to be the right way to rotate the preload rings. I was just being ironic 😉
 
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Hmmmm, maybe you misunderstood my fix. 🤔

It had nothing to do with offensive words but just stating that, at the end of the day, the hammer and chisel always seems to be the right way to rotate the preload rings. I was just being ironic 😉
I understood you fix! 😁 my point was the webpage censored ******* when spelled as one word. I just thought it was funny.
And yes, I have two chisels and a hammer dedicated to this task. Now that I have a proper shock on the SV this is my first time in 16 years of motorcycling I haven't had to use them.
 

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You may know this but the site will "fix" the word red neck to ** if you leave it as one word. I suppose it is slang, but I didn't think it was offensive.
Re-reading my post I see how this could be misinterpreted. I did not intend this to be a slight at your comment. I have an extremely dry tone, it gets me in situations from time to time.
I am often reminded: better to see the face than hear the name!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Call the method whatever you want... but a long flat bladed screwdriver combined with some assistance from a hammer is the way to go. You don’t need to bludgeon it - just tap it. At least that’s what our track expert mechanic does and he knows all the spring rate codes from each manufacturer off the top of his head, so I personally trust his judgement on how to adjust a shock...
Thanks for the input. I wish Suzuki would have provided better tool clearance for this adjustment, or a better designed tool for this specific task. Lowering the tension was no problem, now set at 1 vs factory set 3, getting it back has been the issue. We tried the hammer and screwdriver method and it appeared that banging (or was it bludgeoning?) was having an adverse affect on the offending part. Will take another look when I get home. Large slip joint pliers, able to get around the adjuster, may be the best bet. Will continue to take a conservative approach to this problem!
 
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