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Discussion Starter #1
So I am changing my clutch cover tonight. I have everything off, clean, and ready to go. new gaskets and everything. I have all of the bolts in and now is time to tighten things up. Can you guess what happened? Yup, I snapped a bolt. I take everything back off to see if I can grab the end of the bolt with pliers. Nope, not with my luck, it broke off flush. So I take a few deep breaths, grab a drill and some bits. I drill a few times and try my bolt extractor. Guess what? THAT **** THING BROKE OFF IN THE HOLE!
I am going to the auto store tomorrow after work to see what they have. Any suggestions here at all? I also thought of calling a mechanic and see if one will do a house call. Probably charge me 100 bones though:( (not to mention the lack of self respect I will have knowing that I had to call someone to fix my f-up) Oh, and what are the the torque specs for those bolts on a 2nd gen?
Thanks:oops::oops:
 

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you could probably button it all up and get (ride) to a mechanic with the bolt missing. you should try tapping it out with a punch and hammer first .
 

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If you can weld and have the equipment... just weld a nut to the broken bolt.

Hold the nut with a pair of pliers, weld the INSIDE of the nut to the surface of the broken bolt then just put a wrench on the nut to back out the bolt. Works every time for me.
 

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Ah, that sucks....
10Nm is maximum on these M6 screws.
I wouldn't recommend to weld anything there because the aluminum will burn right up and thats not too good on a sealing surface.
You probably won't be able to bore the extractor out because its hardened steel but you could try using a dremel with a small grindstone to get this extractor part out. That might take some time but probably is the savest way. Then you bore out the screw in steps up to a 4,5mm drill and use a M6 tap to rethread.
If the bore is too big using a M6 tap I recommend to use "TIME-SERT" thread repair!

Good luck Matt!
 

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if you have a reverse drill bit and reversable drill you may be able unscrew it that way. If you have the right bit (reverse) simply start drilling a hole in the bolt (in reverse) and sometimes it well catch the bolt and begin unscrewing it, unless its to tight in which case you will just be drilling a hole in it, in which case you can thread with a tap and put a bolt in and try unscrewing it that way. But that drill bit thing works, I know from experience, it can work with a standard direction drill bit if the bolt can be screwed through the other side, but I assume thats not an option here. But good luck and I know how you feel, this kinda stuff happens to me all the time at work. Just take it slow and be careful.
Oh ya and don't let the drill bit touch the threads, you'll destroy them in an instant, thus why you need go slow, take your time and be careful.
 

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After I snapped an engine cover bolt, I ended up hand tightening it all around. It's like 7Nm and most torque wrenches have -+4Nm (or was that foot pounds) accuracy, so I just hand tightened and looked for leaks. Good so far. I got another gasket just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the advice. I am heading to sears today to see what I can do. I have a tap and die set at home so I am good there. I will try th get the rest of the bolt extractor out and take it from there. I didn't sleep well last night because of it and so far it has occupied most of my morning. If that is not love for my SV I don't know what it!
 

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good luck, ghetto subscribe for the final outcome.
 

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Definitely get reverse, or "left handed" drill bits (you drill these in reverse). Also a can of penetrating oil just for overkill. Most of the time, a bolt will come out just from the left handed drill bit biting into it and creating friction. If it doesn't, you can try an ezout. If that doesn't work, you can drill out its core, which should release most of the pressure on the threads. This is why making a perfectly centered pilot hole is important.
 

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I think some of you guys are missing t epoint that he now has an ezout stuck in the effing hole, which is a complete PITA to get out since it is too hard to use a drill bit.

-try to use a small punch at an angle to tap on the ezout to try to spin it out of the hole
-use a small bit on a dremel to grind out the ezout. I've done this. Works but takes forever.
-supposedly you can shatter the ezout by getting it cold and whacking it with a punch/ hammer. Seems like a too- delicate spot to fuch with this.
-There are a couple ways of eroding it out. One some machinists can do called "spark erosion." (aka EDM) The other uses an acid and salt solution to dissolve the carbon steel easy out... I will look for the link.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
O.K., I have a couple of different size punches, a bunch of drill bits, tap and die set just in cast, and am geting various bolt removal tools and bits fream sears. I am going to go home, have a few smokes and bring my patientce with me to the garage. I am going to try and drill/smash the ezout out of the bolt. If that doesn't work, I am going to try and grind a flat surface into the bolt (remember, the bolt is now recessed into the hole) and start to drill all over again. Drilling in the middle of the bolt is a f'n B&^ch! I'll then try some of the various bolt removers and if that doesn't work, I will try using a tap and die set to tap the bolt out. I imagine the bolt is softer than the engine block so if I am careful, I should be able to get it all out. Worse case is I drill everything out, screw up the threads, weld the hole shut and re-tap a new hole.:(
I will also take pics so you can all laugh and be happy that you are not me:)
 

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Don't take this the wrong way, but it sounds like you're being a butcher. Drilling and smashing a hardened steel ezy out that's trapped on the end of a bolt housed in your crappy thin wall casting engine is possibly going to end in bitter tears. Remember, when you're beating things around that area, it's all delicate, and won't take much abuse before it cracks a casting.

The reverse twist drill bit (aka left hand twist) isn't actually that bad an idea... the bolt isn't likely to be particularly stuck, although having the ezy out in it now is unfortunate. FYI for future reference, those are extremely nasty in inexperienced hands, I've lost count of the number I've had to remove. Now the bit itself isn't going to work with the ezy out, it's pointed and the snapped ezy out is probably a bit pointed too yeah? You can grind the point out of the drill bit, leaving you with two relatively nasty short sharp prongs... put that in your drill, on a slow speed, running counter clockwise, and try drilling the ezy out with that. With a bit of luck, it'll grab and just untwist the whole kit and caboodle outta your cases. The secret is knowing when to stop if it isn't working out for you... it's not a silver bullet, you have to use your judgement here. Fortunately it's actually a pretty good technique, and has a pretty good success ratio IME. It's also cheap to try, only hard part is finding a decent tool store that stocks a reverse twist drill bit. You're replicating the natural unwinding motion that the allen key would've otherwise given, so don't use the drill on too high a speed.

The ideal is a reversible drill press and a heavy vice to hold the part, neither of which will help you though, but really handy for things like rusted in bleed screws.

Be careful mate, the cases are delicate, the thread in the hole is delicate, it's easy to get off centre and make things worse.
 

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O.K., I have a couple of different size punches, a bunch of drill bits, tap and die set just in cast, and am geting various bolt removal tools and bits fream sears. I am going to go home, have a few smokes and bring my patientce with me to the garage. I am going to try and drill/smash the ezout out of the bolt. If that doesn't work, I am going to try and grind a flat surface into the bolt (remember, the bolt is now recessed into the hole) and start to drill all over again. Drilling in the middle of the bolt is a f'n B&^ch! I'll then try some of the various bolt removers and if that doesn't work, I will try using a tap and die set to tap the bolt out. I imagine the bolt is softer than the engine block so if I am careful, I should be able to get it all out. Worse case is I drill everything out, screw up the threads, weld the hole shut and re-tap a new hole.:(
I will also take pics so you can all laugh and be happy that you are not me:)
I really don't like the "smash" idea- I think you will just mush it into the bolt more. Before you get too into this, try using the punch to "unscrew" the easy-out by hitting it at an angle on the edge. If this doesn't work, then try to grind with a dremel. The drill bits are of no real use (unless you find a diamond bit or something) until you get the easy-out removed.
 

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Sorry for my confusion, guess I didn't realize there was an ezout stuck in it also. Ofcourse the reverse drill bit technique still applys once the cheezout is free. Do you have enough length on it to grab it with a pair of locking vise grips and try twisting it out? If so I would imagine that would work pretty well unless its tourqued and twisted badly enough. Good luck, I'm interested to see how you end up resolving it.
 

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Remember that the ezout works by being twisted in the counter-clockwise direction. So you would try to nudge it in the clockwise direction to get it out.

The ezout teeth aren't that substantial, so hopefully it will let go easily. Which ezout did you use, by the way? Some have a reverse thread on them, some have those short teeth that are set at like a 45 degree angle.
 
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